Lawyers, You Might Be Surprised How Clients Choose You

Lawyers, You Might Be Surprised How Clients Choose You

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Business Development/Sales Leave a Comment

When we analyze why clients and potential clients make a decision to hire you or to hire someone else, it’s easy to assume they’re being logical in their decision-making process, so you operate accordingly. You give them information that appeals to that logical side of their brain.

Let’s discuss that because there’s another side to this discussion you need to be aware of.

If you’d like to listen to this via audio, you can click the green button in the podcast player here. If you prefer to read, I’ve converted this to a blog post below for you.

Welcome to Legal Marketing Minutes, where I share short bursts of current marketing news and advice. I’m your host, Nancy Myrland.

If we haven’t met, I’m a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in content, social and digital media marketing for lawyers and their legal marketers.

Your time is valuable, so let’s get started, okay?

Just The Facts

It’s easy for us to assume that buying decisions, whether they’re ours or someone else’s, are done in a very logical state. We know that if we just present facts, if we just write enough blog posts that contain step-by-step instructions and bulleted lists of the most important and logical steps that something should consider, eventually we are going to appeal to that person because clients and potential clients are very logical people who make very smart decisions.

Logic or Emotion?

Quite a while ago, I wrote down a quote from my friends, Andrew and Pete, that said that buying decisions are 80% emotional and 20% logical.

Whether those percentages differ for different markets or not, the percentages are still important to think of because even though we all fancy ourselves as people who make very logical, fact-based decisions, what’s really happening under the surface is that your clients and potential clients are asking themselves questions under the surface.

“I’m really worried. I don’t want to make the wrong decision. I don’t want to hire the wrong lawyer. What am I supposed to do because this is my career on the line.?”

“I’m really frustrated because I wish we didn’t have this problem in the first place. I wish I didn’t have to spend money even thinking about it, and it’s taking my time away from other things that I should be doing. So I’m frustrated about this. I’m scared.”

“I’m really scared about this because if we don’t get control of this, then this is not good for the company and this is not good for my position within the company. This is not good for anyone at my company. So I’m really worried about this.”

And also:

“I’m not very confident about making this decision. I know that I have so many choices and I’m not quite sure who the right person is, and I’m just not confident because I haven’t gone through this process enough. These lawyers seem very much alike, and I have no idea what to do or who to choose.”

The Emotional Side of Buying

My point here is that people say these things to themselves. That is the emotional side of buying.

What happens when they do have a logical side that is on a fact-based mission to try to figure out if you are the right person to hire, and then they have all these thoughts and feelings and voices that are operating in the background, whether they realize it or not?

If you just stop for a minute and think about some of your own decisions, don’t you have some of those same thoughts when you’re making decisions?

You and I make decisions very much based on emotion. We may have fact-finding in the middle of all that, but our emotions control the day.

What Does This Mean For You?

This means that, in addition to providing the facts to appeal to their logical side, you also have to show your human side. You also have to show, and I know this word is overused, but you have to show empathy.

You have to show that you understand.

You have to show enough of your soft skills, your soft side. You need to be able to acknowledge that, yes, maybe they’re worried about this situation or choice, or frustrated about what’s going on, then let them know you understand. You understand because you would be, too.

  • You can say things that will help them to not be so afraid.
  • Perhaps that is that you have worked in this space for a long time.
  • You can share stories, some very human stories about others.

You don’t need to provide names because you don’t want to talk about clients to other clients, but you can show them that you understand and that you are not just there to throw facts at them, that you understand.

You don’t have to come right out and say those words to them.

“Oh, I know you’re worried.”

“Gosh, I know you’re frustrated.” or

“Hmmm, yep, I know you’re scared.”

“Yeah. You don’t seem very confident.”

Obviously, you don’t want to be that literal with clients and potential clients when you sense that those emotions are stirring under the surface. But your words can show your human side. Your body language can also help put them at ease, and yes, you can also do this virtually if you’re using Zoom or other virtual meeting platforms.

People Can Sense Your Empathy

They can see it in your eyes. They can see it in the way you lean in and listen. They can see it in the way you hold your body.

Think about the way you react when talking to someone in your family. You know they have an important decision to make. You sense or you know something is bothering or challenging them. You ask questions to try to uncover the reason behind the challenge. You instinctively show empathy or sympathy. You show caring and concern on your face. You let them know you care.

They Are Looking For Someone To Make Their Job Easier

This is the same when you talk to your clients and potential clients. Yes, be fact-based. Appeal to that left-brain part of them that wants to make an objective decision by giving them a logical set of facts to deal with, but also realize that they are looking for someone to help make their job easier. They’re looking for someone to help them make their decision easier.

How To Be The One They Remember

If you are the one that can show empathy, that can show that you understand this is a frustrating situation and that it’s not an easy decision, and you ask questions to try to draw that out of them, you are going to be the one that is more memorable to them than others.

Again, you don’t need to verbalize their underlying feelings and insecurities exactly. You just need to blend that smart, logical, fact-based side of what you offer with the human, understanding, perceptive side that will help you connect with your clients and potential clients in a way that results in a connection that makes a difference when they are making the important decision of who to choose as their lawyer, their advisor, their problem-solver, or their advocate.

Until next time.

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and virtual presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here. If you would like to be notified when LinkedIn Course For Lawyers is accepting new students again, you can do that here.

If You Are Really Uncomfortable Being On Video, I Have A Plan For You

If You Are Really Uncomfortable Being On Video, I Have A Plan For You

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Video Marketing Leave a Comment

I talk a lot about using video as a differentiator, and as a way to accelerate the know, like, and trust factors your clients need and want. Voice and video bring you to life and cause people to feel like they already know you, or know you better.

Working in this voice and video space as an advisor, I know there are many professionals who are not yet comfortable showing up on video. Allow me to help you get over that hump.

Walking the talk, I created a short video that outlines my plan for you. If you prefer to read, you can do that directly below this LinkedIn video player as I have rewritten the transcription as a blog post.

(By the way, let me know if you think the captions on this video are too small. I might need to use a larger font next time. Your feedback is valuable to me.)

If we haven’t met yet, I’m Nancy Myrland. I am the President of Myrland Marketing & Social Media. I am also known as LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, and the Founder of The Lawyers Marketing Academy and LinkedIn Course For Lawyers.

This Can Set You Apart From Other Lawyers

Let’s talk about video and livestreaming because these are important tools for you to consider using when you communicate. There are many times in your practice and your business that it would make sense for you to record a quick video, or to go live on video to help your clients, potential clients, and followers learn about:

  • Something that you do
  • Something they need to do
  • Recent developments that have an impact on their businesses
  • …or up-to-the-minute breaking news.

Communicating these things in a timely manner can help set you apart. The good news is these videos don’t need to be professionally produced. They can be, but that’s a different kind of video than what I am talking about here.

Baby Steps

I was recently in a Zoom meeting with some people who are learning about livestreaming. One of the professionals who had her camera turned off talked about not being comfortable being seen on camera.

One of the suggestions I gave was to take baby steps.

You might even think that creating your own video, or going live on video on social media, are both so far away from anything that is possible right now because the thought of being on camera makes you sick from being nervous and/or anxious.

If that is you, let’s talk about the baby steps that will help you become more comfortable.

Here’s what that might look like. The next time you’re going to be in a Zoom meeting and people are able to turn their cameras on, instead of shutting down your camera, or never turning it on in the first place, commit to getting yourself to a comfortable place before you get there.

A comfortable place might mean getting ready as if you are leaving the house or apartment and know you are going to be seeing other people. That means different things to different people. Whatever it is for you, get to that point.

Then I want you to join the meeting and just turn on your camera.

  • Don’t worry about saying anything, except for a polite hello and a friendly nod or smile if that is what everyone else is doing.
  • If the meeting is too large for everyone to speak, don’t worry about contributing verbally.
  • Don’t think you have to do anything smart or brilliant.

Smart and brilliant are not what we are working on right now. There is plenty of time for that. Our focus is getting you to a more comfortable place while on camera.

Baby steps.

It Can Be Frightening

The baby step of turning that camera on can be frightening. I understand that. I’m one of the odd people that is over that hump and actually enjoys livestreaming and going on camera and interacting with people.

Don’t use me as an example (yet) unless you want to say, oh, that’s what I could get to. That’s great, but don’t expect you’re going to get this comfortable right at the start. I don’t even want to look at my original livestreams or my original videos because, when I do, I think, oh my goodness!

Just tell yourself that for the next two Zoom meetings, you are going to get yourself dressed and prepared in a way that you’re comfortable with, and you’re just going to turn that camera on and that’s it. That’s a great way to get started.

After The First Two

Now, after you do two of those, you may say to yourself, alright, I’m feeling more comfortable. I’m going to commit to doing that two more times.

When you continue to do that and realize that everyone isn’t staring at you to judge you, but rather to see and interact with you to get to know you better, you will likely find that it becomes second nature to turn on your camera during these virtual meetings.

I Have Days When It Makes Sense To Be Off-Camera

There are days when I’m in Zoom meetings when I might not have any other external client or networking meetings, yet I want to be a part of that Zoom meeting because I want to learn something from that presenter who has chosen to use Zoom meeting, which allows everyone to be on-camera. I might be in shorts, a messy bun, and glasses, or whatever, but I’m not going on camera that day.

This is different. This is just getting you to a place where you are comfortable being on camera when it counts.

In Summary

This is my first recommendation for you. Just commit to being on camera for the next few Zoom meetings. After you do that, see if you can commit to two more. Again, this is just building up that comfort and familiarity.

We can talk about more tips as we go along, but I just wanted to give you this first one to start with because I understand that for some it can be extremely uncomfortable.

If you are one of those people, tell me if you think this is something that you can do, or if you think this would be at all helpful.

Perhaps you know someone who is in that space who really hates seeing themselves on camera, someone who is very, very uncomfortable with it, then I would appreciate it if you would share this with them.

If you have any questions and don’t want to post them publicly, just let me know. Feel free to email me at [email protected]

You can do this. I know you can.

Baby steps. Go easy on yourself.

Just baby steps.

Take care.

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and virtual presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here. If you would like to be notified when LinkedIn Course For Lawyers is accepting new students again, you can do that here.

Lawyers Here's How To Answer This Uncomfortable Client Question

Lawyers, Here’s How To Answer This Uncomfortable Client Question

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Business Development/Sales Leave a Comment

“Why should I choose you over someone else?”

If you haven’t already, one of these days, you might find yourself in the position of having someone whose business you’re trying to earn look at you and ask you this question.

They may be asking that question genuinely. They may just be testing you to see how you answer it. How you answer it is very important. So let’s discuss.

If you would like to listen to this via podcast, just press the green play button. If you prefer to read, I’ve converted this to a blog post below for you.

Welcome to Legal Marketing Minutes, where I share short bursts of current marketing news and advice.

I’m your host, Nancy Myrland. If we haven’t met, I’m a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in content, social and digital media marketing for lawyers and their legal marketers. Your time is valuable, so let’s get started.

That question can really throw you off. You’re wondering, why are they asking me that? What am I supposed to say? I don’t want to say the wrong thing, but yet in my mind, I know I am more qualified than that other person they may be considering.

Here Is A Script For You

I want you to take the high road, but also give that person the information they need.

Here’s what I would recommend:

“I don’t know that I’m the right person for you to hire. I hope so. But what I can do is to tell you why I am qualified, and what my experience is, what my perspective is on the challenges that you have that we have discussed. I will answer every question that you have. Hopefully, I’m the one you choose in the end, but you are the one to make that decision in the best way possible.”

Respect

Your potential client has to respect that. I have witnessed conversations in meetings, on video, or something someone has posted online where they start to bash people and talk about why what they do is better than someone else. They sometimes think they are being subtle and anonymous and just referring to other people, but it is often very obvious.

Be worthy of their respect.

You Don’t Want To Build This Reputation

The same thing goes for when you are trying to earn business. This is a serious conversation. When you are talking about legal and business matters, those matter greatly to your client. This could mean a great book of business for you now and in the future because the future grows upon what is happening now.

What I do not want you to do is to build a reputation of being the person that put someone else down.

Don’t Worry

Don’t worry about the other person. Don’t worry about that person’s skills. Don’t worry about matching yourself up against another human being.

If I was hiring somebody, I wouldn’t want to hear somebody say,

“Oh, you should choose me because that person, I don’t know…I’m not sure they can be trusted. They’ve said some things that I’m not sure I agree with.”

Take The High Road

When you go down that path, you start to look like you’re just a little bit desperate, and that you are propping yourself up by making others look bad. In your client’s or potential client’s eyes, that is not a good path for you to take. They don’t need to see or hear that from you.

Take the high road.

Tell them that, ultimately, they are the person that can make that decision in the best way, but you are going to do whatever you can to equip them with all of the details so that they can see why you are the best person for the job. That means that the discussion revolves around what they have discussed with you.

Be A Matchmaker

If you have questions, keep asking them questions so that you fully understand the challenge they are facing, and so that they can tell you truly care about them. Then use your qualifications and your knowledge to speak specifically to what that client or potential client has told you. If you are not the right person to help, refer them to someone else.

Bottom Line

Take the high road but help make their decision easier by giving them information that will help them choose you. Match your qualifications to what you know about them, or to the answers they have given you when you have asked follow-up questions during your conversation.

That is the reputation you want to have.

Let Me Know

Well, that’s it for today’s Legal Marketing Minutes. Please do me a favor and let me know your thoughts about this topic and how you would answer that question, or if you’ve ever been asked that question.

Please leave a comment as I’d love to hear from you.

Also, if you are connected to the legal profession, I invite you to join my Facebook group where we discuss marketing and business development, content, social and digital media marketing. Again, that is https://www.facebook.com/groups/socialmediaforlawyers . Let me know this episode or blog post is where you found out about the group.

Thank You

Thank you so much for spending a few legal marketing minutes with me. I know your time is valuable, so I appreciate you spending a few of them right here with me.

Until next time, I’m Nancy Myrland.

Take care.

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and virtual presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here. If you would like to be notified when LinkedIn Course For Lawyers is accepting new students again, you can do that here.

Two Pieces of Advice For Law School Graduates

Two Pieces of Advice For Law School Graduates

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Career Development & Education Leave a Comment

Congratulations, graduates!

Finishing law school is no small accomplishment. I know I don’t need to tell you that as you’ve lived it daily.

Your Incredible Opportunity

You are about to enter an amazing part of your lives where you get to put all of your knowledge, drive, personality, and dreams together to help others while making a living doing it. That is a huge gift and an incredible opportunity!

There are many who can speak to the nuances of becoming a lawyer, meaning the day-in and day-out. I have two pieces of advice for you to help set you up for success.

Two Pieces of Advice for You

My recommendations for you are:

1) Think like an owner/partner, &

2) Become a very smart and productive networker

Think Like An Owner/Partner

First, think like an owner/partner. Even if you are years away from having those titles, is important because these are the people you are going to be hired by, will report to, and whose lives depend on your work.

Be cautious about expecting firms and employers to mold schedules and accommodations to you and your style. Employers are still adapting to the changes thrust upon them during COVID.

In many cases, it has stressed their cultural and financial situations. Most are doing the best they can, changing to adapt to a “new” work style that incorporates more of a digital presence while trying to figure out how to stay profitable while serving clients and colleagues.

Owners and other leaders have to speak to their internal and external clients, investors, and shareholders, so they have to create an environment that speaks to all parties they are responsible to and for.

Think about putting that puzzle together, not just once a year or quarter, but every day. This is nothing short of a Herculean effort.

Smart and productive networker

Second, become a very smart and productive networker. I want you to network as if your livelihood depends on it because it does!

Even if you haven’t been comfortable so far getting to know people you identify as important to your career, you need to move past that trepidation to find a way to get to know them and to find ways to become known to them.

Being strategic about networking will have a major impact on your career and your practice because you will rely on others for referrals, promotions, positive reviews, mentions of and links to you in articles and blog posts, for your education, and much more.

Trust and Connection Are Required

This never stops. Putting yourself in the shoes of those you will be serving your entire career and life is a skill that will serve you well. Some call it empathy.

Also, networking is now an official part of your job search, your job, and your career. You will have a difficult time earning the trust of employers and clients if they don’t know anything about you, or if they don’t feel any connection to you.

It’s time to connect.

You can do this!

Congratulations and the best of everything to you!

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and virtual presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here. If you would like to be notified when LinkedIn Course For Lawyers is accepting new students again, you can do that here.

3 Ways To Become A Better Networker

3 Ways To Become A Much Better Networker

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Business Development/Sales, Networking Leave a Comment

Have you ever met someone and asked them a question about what they do, or how they are, or what their opinion is about a subject, then find they get so wrapped up in what they are saying that they never stop to say:

“How about you? What do you think?”

“What about you? What do you do?”

“How are you doing?”

This happens frequently.

Some People Are Wired Differently

People get so wrapped up in their own thoughts and answers they forget to reciprocate. They might lack the confidence to know how to stop for a moment and bring you into their world by asking for your opinion. They might even feel awkward and not know how to ask.

It’s sad to say that a few might not even care what you think because they are accustomed to being the one everyone wants to meet and hear from.

I have even experienced the charming phenomenon of having someone talk to my husband without ever looking at me, except for the 10 seconds when I am asking a follow-up question or two about a comment made that I obviously care about. They answer my question by looking at him.

3 Suggestions That Will Help You Network More Effectively

Even if it doesn’t come naturally to you, you can learn these skills that make networking much more meaningful to you and to the other person.

Here are a few suggestions:

  • Take the time to listen and ask natural follow-up questions.
  • If you are answering another person’s question, stop now and then to ask that person what they think.
  • Look at that person when they are talking. Even if you feel terribly insecure, you might make the other person feel you are disinterested if you are looking away.

By the way, these networking skills and suggestions apply to both online and in-person networking. They are slightly nuanced, but the principles are the same. I talk about that here in LinkedIn Course For Lawyers. 

Suggestions From My Networking Colleagues and Friends

I appreciate these networking suggestions that were shared with me last week when I first began to discuss this topic on LinkedIn.

First, Jennifer Forester:

Jennifer Forester Networking Recommendation

 

 

 

 

 

…and another from Sandra Long:

Sandra Long networking suggestion

 

 

 

 

 

Show Others They Are Valuable

When you show these common networking courtesies, you cause the other person to think they matter, that their opinion is just as valuable as yours, and that you truly want to learn about them.

Look for ways to bring others into your fold, into your world, and into your conversation. These skills help build the relationships that matter and that bind people together.

Have you been the recipient of any of the practices I described above?

Registration For “LinkedIn Course For Lawyers” Is Now Open!

Registration for LinkedIn Course For Lawyers Is OpenWhile you’re here, I want you to know that registration for “LinkedIn Course For Lawyers” is open through April 15! I am excited about this as it has been in the works for more than 5 years…okay, 10. I haven’t been working on it that long (that would be silly), but I’ve been planning on doing it for that long.

Registration for Founding Members at a special Founding Member price will be open through April 15, then I will not offer the course again for a while because I will be working closely in live and recorded training with my students and other consulting clients to help them turn LinkedIn into the reputation, relationship, and business development tool that it is.

I hope you and your colleagues will join me. Here is where you can find additional details about LinkedIn Course For Lawyers.

 

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and virtual presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Why Won't Publications Ask You For A Quote

Why Won’t Publications Ask You For A Quote?

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Content Marketing, Lawyer Marketing, Social Media Leave a Comment

Wouldn’t it be nice if you could get the trades and business publications to write about one of your recent matters or accomplishments?

Wouldn’t it be nice if your name was included when your client’s merger was discussed in the news?

Wouldn’t it be great if your local business journal acknowledged what you and your firm are doing in the community?

Wouldn’t it be nice if you were called as a source when stories were written about recent developments in your practice area?

Wouldn’t it be nice if your clients, referral sources, and colleagues quickly thought of you when asked for recommendations for someone like you?

Journalists Won’t Always Remember You

Of course, it would be nice, but human beings are who they are. They don’t always remember that you are who you are and that you have the talent they need or want.

They have a lot of people to remember. They have a lot of assignments on their desk.

This is why you need to take control of your message.

Become Your Own Publisher

You need to become your own publisher and media source. Don’t wait around for others to write about you, or to include your name in stories about matters you know they should know you are connected to because you’ve been working on them so hard for so long.

3 Ways You Take Control Of Your Own Message

  • Make sure you are commenting on social media posts that others are discussing. This subtly shows your knowledge. If it is someone you perceive to be a competitor, be careful about not hijacking their posts as that can come across as a bit desperate and inconsiderate. Choose wisely.
  • Make sure you have an updated bio on your website and a robust profile on LinkedIn so there is no question what you do. If you use other social media, make sure those profiles are updated, too. Don’t forget that media spend time searching Twitter for sources.
  • Make sure you are regularly writing articles and blog posts that demonstrate your passion for those topics your clients care about. Few practices demonstrate your deep knowledge more than covering it on a regular basis. Content like this lives on even after social media posts float away into the algorithmic abyss.

Choose You

Be your own media and publisher. Don’t wait for anyone else to tell your story.

Don’t wait to be chosen.

Choose yourself.

Until next time…

My LinkedIn Course For Lawyers Is Opening!

LinkedIn Course For Lawyers with Nancy MyrlandWhile you’re here, I want you to know that registration for “LinkedIn Course For Lawyers” is a few days away from opening! I am excited about this as it has been in the works for more than 5 years. I haven’t been working on it that long (that would be silly), but I’ve been planning on doing it for that long.

I will open registration for Founding Members at a special Founding Member price for about a week, then I will not offer the course again for a while because I will be working closely in live and recorded training with my students and other consulting clients to help them turn LinkedIn into the reputation, relationship, and business development tool that it is.

I hope you and your colleagues will join me there. Here is where you can find additional details about LinkedIn Course For Lawyers.

 

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and virtual presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Burger King's BIG Twitter Mistake: Lessons Learned

Burger King’s BIG Twitter Mistake: Lessons Learned

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Crisis Management, Social Media, Twitter Leave a Comment

In case you were too busy yesterday to notice the Internet blowing up about Burger King’s social media misstep, let’s take a moment or two to help you catch up, and for me to share my perspective on the situation so that we can all learn from this situation.

We all need to be very careful about being clever on social media. Even if you are the most beloved brand in the world, and I’m not saying Burger King is, but one short Tweet can get you in a lot of hot water…or grease in this case.

Burger King Tweeted this on Monday morning, March 8:

“Women belong in the kitchen.   — @BurgerKingUK”

Burger King International Women's Day Tweet

Nice, huh? Not so much.

Burger King Had Great Intentions

Well, it seems they were trying to cleverly tee up their news about their efforts to provide scholarships to the women who work at Burger King restaurants, which would allow them to move up the ranks to become chefs and head chefs in the industry.

Congratulations on that scholarship effort.

Congratulations on launching it on International Women’s Day.

That is where my congratulatory feelings end.

This isn’t an attack on Burger King just for the sake of piling on. There’s plenty of that running around. Instead, as I have done with United Airlines and another crisis communications preparedness post, I choose to use this as a learning and teaching moment, not only for Burger King, but for those who are watching this situation, wondering what could have been done instead.

As you will see below, I think Burger King has learned its lesson, but it is going to take some time to overcome the ill will it caused by using the teaser approach that they did.

All PR Is [NOT] Good PR

I’ve seen many express the thought that all PR is good PR.

That is an antiquated thought, my friends. If I had Tweeted that, how long do you think it would take you to move past the feelings you would suddenly have about me? Would that cause you to suddenly contact me to help you with a project? No, you wouldn’t.

All PR is not good PR.

Hey, Let’s Take Out A Full Page Ad!

As the story unfolded yesterday, many were quick to share a screenshot of an ad that Burger King also placed in the New York Times. The headline was the same, followed by the message they left on Twitter.

Again, great initiative. Bad execution.

AdAge reports that:

“A full-page ad running in The New York Times shows the line in large font and follows with several lines that explain the idea behind Burger King H.E.R. (Helping Equalize Restaurants) scholarship, including the low representation of women in chef and head chef roles across the industry. On Twitter, however, the usage of the line was quickly misconstrued. Burger King U.K. tweeted out just the line “Women belong in the kitchen” on Monday morning, and it was only in subsequent tweets that the intended meaning was explained.”

Burger King's Ad in The New York Times

Let’s Just Delete That Tweet

In their article, AdAge and many others across social media reported that:

“Later on March 8, Burger King U.K. deleted the Tweet and explained its reasoning in a separate Twitter post. “We hear you. We got our initial tweet wrong and we’re sorry,” it began in one tweet. A second tweet read: “We decided to delete the original tweet after our apology. It was brought to our attention that there were abusive comments in the thread and we don’t want to leave the space open for that.”

Here are the Tweets that attempted to clean up the mess:

Burger King's Apology Twitter Thread

I understand what they did. The discussion was so divisive, abusive, and inflammatory that they decided it would be better to remove the original culprit…the ill-fated but well-intentioned Tweet.

Lessons Learned From Burger King

We can all learn from this situation. Here are a few lessons:

  • Abandon the clever Tweets that likely make you and others in your firm cringe a little, or that cause you to ask your agency if this is really going to work because it seems to be a little controversial. When those feelings occur, and I have a feeling they were expressed during their strategy meetings, listen to them.
  • If you have to explain your first Tweet with subsequent Tweets in order to make the first Tweet look not-so-bad and less cringe-worthy, then something is wrong.
  • Don’t ever expect anyone to read the follow-up to your social media messages in order to understand your true meaning. The first message is the most visible one and can cause enough disruption that nothing will undo what happened as a result of that first message, even if it is that you are giving away a million dollars. People might not forget, and they might not read past your first message.
  • If you have something wonderful to announce and launch, then make that obvious upfront, or at least don’t use a controversial click-bait comment or headline to get people to stop the scroll and read.
  • If you make a mistake, own up to it. Talk about it, even when it hurts or feels awkward.

How Could Burger King Have Tweeted This Announcement?

What if they had said:

1st Tweet:

It’s International Women’s Day, and we have some very exciting news. You see, we’ve become very aware that we need to provide the skills, knowledge, and encouragement that will help #TheWomenofBK be promoted to head chef positions in our company. (The character counts might not be perfect, but you can figure this out to make it work for you.)

2nd Threaded Tweet:

We can do better. The facts: Only 20% of professional chefs in UK kitchens are women. That’s not right. Our kitchens are open to all who want to learn and become professional chefs.

3rd Threaded Tweet:

We can do better. Starting today, we are going to work hard to change that by awarding culinary scholarships to women on our staff because they are the best of the best at what they do, and they deserve to be promoted.

4th Threaded Tweet:

We can do better. This starts today. Listen to a few messages from the women of BK who are now professional chefs. We are inspired by them and have invited them to help us craft this scholarship program so that we do it right.

5th Through 20th Threaded Tweets:

These Tweets would incorporate messages with photos or brief videos from real women who work at Burger King, including those with aspirations and those who are already executive chefs. Bring this initiative to life by letting us see real faces.

Bottom Line

Again, this isn’t an attack on Burger King. They are embarrassed and have told us they learned their lesson. This was a difficult lesson for them to learn, but they owned up to their mistake and attempted to fix it.

Some will forgive them, some will not.

Some were offended by it, others were not, and even think people overreacted. Don’t minimize the real feelings of those who were offended by your posts just because some are not offended.

When you are ready to plan a promotion like this, watch the controversial, click-baiting, clever headlines, comedy, and edgy headlines you are tempted to use. They can and will be misunderstood.

Your thoughts?

Until next time…

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and virtual presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Lawyers, A Robust LinkedIn Profile Is Not Enough

Lawyers, A Robust LinkedIn Profile Is Not Enough

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Business Development/Sales, LinkedIn Leave a Comment

You can’t expect your LinkedIn profile to do all of the heavy lifting for you.

You might be surprised to read that from me because you know me as an active LinkedIn trainer and coach, but this next point is important.

Networking Is A Contact Sport

When it comes to reaching the right people at the right time with the right message, you need to play an active role.

Networking is a contact sport. You can’t do it alone.

A Robust LinkedIn Profile Is Only The Start

You can (and should) create a robust profile, but don’t expect it to do everything.

Once you have made yourself digitally discoverable and credible by filling out all of the sections LinkedIn gives you, which you might not even know exist because you have to add and populate them for them to be visible, you can’t close your app or browser tab and pretend LinkedIn will take care of bringing in new business for you.

That is similar to putting your bio on your firm’s website and sitting at your desk waiting for the phone to ring or vibrate, or for an email to arrive.

Who Is Important To You?

You need to spend time on LinkedIn interacting with the people you care about, or who are important to the strength of your practice.

I’m not suggesting you spend hours there every day, or even one hour a day, but a few minutes here and there spent on best practices is what will accelerate the relationship-building process.

I Have Good News For You

The good news? Most people are not taking the time to interact in a meaningful way, which means you can stand out by being the one.

Be the one.

Until next time…

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and virtual presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Lawyers, Before You Host A Webinar or Event, Do This First

Lawyers, Here Is A Webinar and Virtual Event Checklist For You To Follow

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Video Marketing, Virtual Presentation Skills Leave a Comment

You’re finally on-board, interested, and maybe even a little excited about hosting a webinar or other online event. Intuitively, and maybe even competitively, you know you need to be “out there.”

You’re ready!

Well, before you take one more step, there’s something you need to do first or your event could be a flop.

Let’s discuss.

Listen, Then Download The Checklist 

Please listen to this brief 5-minute Legal Marketing Minutes podcast episode in the player directly below, but I don’t want you to miss the Successful Virtual Event Strategy checklist I have prepared for you, which you will find mentioned below the player. It includes a fill-in-the-blank version of the checklist that will guide you as you think about the items in the checklist.

Do You Have A Marketing Professional To Help You?

If you are truly lucky, or smart, you have a marketing or business development professional, maybe even 2 or 20, to help you walk this path. Please share this post with them so you are all on the same page.

Maybe you don’t have anyone to help you. Either way, you are still responsible for thinking through this list I am sharing with you.

Click on this image below to request a copy of the checklist referenced in the podcast.

Successful Webinars and Virtual Events for Lawyers

It is necessary to work through these steps in order for your attendees, those people who are your clients, potential clients, referral sources, media, and other influencers to see this event as smooth, professional, and worthy of their valuable time. If you skip them and rush into your event, you risk looking unprepared.

As I mentioned above, the summary checklist of all of these steps in this episode can be found via this link.

Are You Ready?

Are you ready to host a webinar or other event?

Have you downloaded the checklist?

I know your time is valuable, and I don’t take that lightly, so I appreciate you spending a few of your legal marketing minutes right here with me.

Until next time…

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and virtual presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

 

How Soon Should You Contact A Potential Client

Lawyers, How Soon Should You Contact A Potential Client?

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Business Development/Sales, Content Marketing, Training in Client Service and Business Development/Sal Leave a Comment

I have been the recipient of a few practices that I think border on professional stalking, and you probably have, too. The last thing that I want for you is to be perceived as though you are overstepping or professionally stalking your potential clients, so I want you to learn from my experience.

I recently attended a wonderful webinar hosted by my friends David Ackert and John Corey. If you don’t know them, I recommend you get to know them because they’re very smart people.

They were talking about business development, which got me thinking because they were talking about “top of funnel” activities.

Stick with me here. I started my career in sales, or what we might call business development in the legal profession today. My job was completely dependent on listening, research, relationships, customization, and follow-up, so this topic is near and dear to me.

Podcast or Blog Post: Your Choice Below

If you would like to listen to the podcast version of this, you can click the green button below. I also turned it into a blog post for you, which you can find below that. If you are reading this off of my website, just click here to return to the post and podcast.

A Basic Explanation Of The Sales Funnel For You

You may or may not have heard of the sales funnel. Let me shorten it to suggest that you picture a funnel with the top of it being the biggest and the bottom being the smallest, obviously.

Your general marketing activities and content are what bring curious people into the top of your sales funnel. Something you have said, done, or posted has made someone curious enough to consume a little bit of you.

This top part of your funnel can bring a lot of people in, but all of those people will not end up making their way to the bottom of your funnel with others who have decided they are very interested in doing business with you. You haven’t gone through a process of feeding these top of funnel people more targeted information that has to do with their specific issue, and they haven’t gone through the process of self-selecting their way deeper into your funnel to get to know you better.

I kept that description of the sales funnel short for the purposes of this discussion. If you’d like, you and I can go a lot deeper into that conversation another time.

Accelerating A Relationship That Hasn’t Even Started

What I don’t want to see happen to you and your potential clients is what I have seen happen too often, which is that you try to accelerate a relationship that hasn’t even started.

It helps to remember that most of your potential clients choose to go through a bit of research before they decide they want to talk to you or any other lawyer about their matter.

That research can include asking for a referral from someone else. It can also mean going to your website to check you out. It can mean they have gone to your LinkedIn profile to review your qualifications and background. (By the way, if you have not polished your LinkedIn presence, this resource might be helpful to you. It is important for the reasons I am describing today.)

Your Potential Clients Want To Learn

It could be they have downloaded a resource much like this LinkedIn checklist from me, for example. It could also be that they attended a webinar like I did with David Ackert and John Corey. It could be so many things that people are just interested in because they are curious.

They are checking you out and they want some more information. They could be mildly curious, or they could be very curious about a specific topic, but chances are they have not yet progressed to the point where they are thinking “Oh, my gosh, I really need to get to know this lawyer because I’ve just started to research him or her.”

Give Them Room To Breathe

I want you to be careful about contacting them too soon. I want you to give them room to breathe before you move in on them.

What does that mean?

Well, some of you are starting to use tools such as HubSpot and some other tools that do some lead scoring so that you can tell when someone has been on your website. You can tell when they have visited certain pages. You can even put a Facebook or a LinkedIn pixel on your website so that you can see who has visited certain pages, and then you can contact them accordingly with a message that acknowledges that.

Well, the following is what I do not want to see happen with that kind of intelligence.

This Practice Turns People Off

One of the largest sales companies in the world is, in my opinion, one of the most aggressive actors in this respect. Occasionally, I will read a resource of theirs. I will consume a piece of content on this company’s website. Keep in mind that I could be a referral source for this company because I could talk to you about this company. But when I read a lone piece of content every once in a great while, and I mean once a year at the most, that should be a message to them that I am in the research phase when I am reading that content.

On more than one occasion over the years, immediately after I left that page on this company’s website, I received a phone call or an email.

When this immediate follow-up occurs after one piece of content has been consumed, that feels way too pushy because my behavior at the top of their sales funnel should not have been an indication to them that I was ready for contact that is that personal.

I need to move just a bit further into their funnel. I need to have more experience with them before they call or email. I need to build those know, like, and trust factors a little bit more before they engage in a middle or a bottom of the funnel activity, which allows for more intimate contact with me, such as sending me an email or calling me. I am not there yet.

Your Potential Clients Are No Different

Just because they have read something of yours, consumed a piece of content, clicked a reaction on LinkedIn, or any number of subtle gestures, don’t assume people are ready for their phones to ring. Be very careful and take this on a case-by-case basis. Be careful when you are using marketing technology such as HubSpot or other lead scoring tools, or even your own intuition so you don’t misunderstand and assume this potential client is ready to have more personal contact from you.

Those Who Haven’t Entered Your Funnel

Let’s also talk about cold contacts. Those who have not yet entered your world or your funnel are considered cold contacts. These are people you have no contact with; no conversation, and no commenting back and forth via social media or any other medium. They haven’t even consumed any of your content, at least not that you know of.  This person can be considered a cold contact because they might not know who you are yet.

What I don’t want you to do is what I have experienced many times, which is something that really turns me off as a potential purchaser of services. At this stage, you do not want to ask that person for an appointment. It is not a best practice to send this person a private message or an email to say you would like to schedule a time to talk about what you do for a living because you know you can help them.

Don’t Assume You Are The Right Solution

Don’t assume you can help them because you don’t know that yet. You haven’t had enough contact with that person. During the business development process, you need to respect peoples’ boundaries. There will come a time when you have spent more time getting to know that person, interacting with them in different spaces, or by helping them get to know you by creating content that demonstrates your expertise. You will make that content easy to find by sharing it broadly in the spaces you know they occupy. Make you and your knowledge easy for them to find. Offer a registration form near your content so they can choose to move to the next stage of your funnel and get to know you even better.

There Are Always Exceptions

Of course, there are exceptions to all of these situations.

You may have a feeling in your gut when the best time is to contact someone you have connected with along the way. If you aren’t sure, I can be your sounding board to guide you and to give you feedback on those kinds of business development activities.

Bottom Line

Again, be very careful. Don’t rush your contact with your potential clients. Give them some space to research and get to know you. Let them breathe. Let them feel like your relationship is completely natural because they have progressed through your relationship funnel and are ready for you.

Thanks again to David Ackert and John Corey for inspiring this post and this episode of the Legal Marketing Minutes podcast, and for bringing these additional thoughts out of my brain today. I appreciate both of them because they are longtime friends and good people.

Additional episodes of the Legal Marketing Minutes podcast can be found right here. I’d love to have you as a subscriber!

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and video presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.