2023 LinkedIn Is Rolling Out A New Way To Make Your Profile More Noticeable

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out A New Way To Make Your Profile More Noticeable

Nancy MyrlandAll Posts, LinkedIn, Social Media Leave a Comment

LinkedIn is rolling out a new feature that will call attention to your posts and other activity on LinkedIn.

As I often mention when I work with my clients, I want your profiles and your content to be scroll-stopping (desktop), or thumb-stopping (mobile). This new feature will help stop the scroll as it will make your profile more visual. Visuals are known to catch the attention of those who might otherwise scroll right on by. We have become a more visual society and are more attracted to visual content than ever before.

LinkedIn is responding to that trend.

NOTE: Don’t miss the video tutorial I’ve prepared for you at the end. It will show you how this works. 

Why Is This Important?

Your activity section on LinkedIn provides an outstanding glimpse into your personal brand as it shows your comments, posts, articles, newsletters, or what I call your “presence,” meaning how you demonstrate your knowledge and your willingness to interact with others. In other words, your activity while on the platform. It showcases you.

LinkedIn will now give you the opportunity to decide what kind of content is going to be shown first in your Activity section.

As it stands, when you go to your profile, then click on Activity, you and your profile viewers will see the most horrifically boring Activity section on the face of the planet.

I mean…look at it. This is my Activity section, and it puts me to sleep. It’s not that it is my activity. Heavens no, that’s pretty interesting (IMHO…wink, wink). It is the format that is dreadfully boring. What about this is inviting to you…other than knowing there are major nuggets of gold if you click on any one of them, that is?

This poor Activity section of mine looks pathetic, doesn’t it? I wouldn’t call this scroll-stopping or thumb-stopping.

Nancy's Myrland's LinkedIn Activity Section Pre-2023 ChangeNow You Will Be Able To Showcase Your Activity With The New LinkedIn Profile Update

As LinkedIn is telling us,

“To help your content stand out and make it easier for others to discover, we’ve developed several new tools.”

and

“We’ve spruced up the Activity section of your LinkedIn Profile to more visibly display your content. Whether it’s images, videos, newsletters or documents, you get to choose the content type your Activity section shows first. This new experience will be available to all members in the next few weeks and we hope that as a result your network will quickly find and engage with your content, leading to more professional connections and opportunities.”

You and Your LinkedIn Profile Visitors Will Have Choices

It appears as though the new tabs across the top that will be visible will include:

  • Posts
  • Videos
  • Comments
  • Images
  • Articles
  • Newsletters
  • Events

We will now be able to choose the type of activity that we want our profile viewers to see first. As you will see in the screenshots below, even after you have chosen which form of content they will see first, they will be able to toggle over to the other categories to see additional forms of content. That allows them to go right to the type of content they want to consume first, which makes your profile more “sticky,” meaning they will linger longer on your profile.

We like that. We want that.

Videos First

What that means is that, if you have posted videos, then you will want to show those first in the Activity section because they will definitely be scroll-stopping.

Images First

If you have posted images and no videos, then you might want to show images to them first.

Articles First

If the articles you have posted are more important, then you might want to show those first.

Documents First

If you have uploaded what LinkedIn calls documents, you might want to show those first.

2023 LinkedIn has rolled out a new Activity section DocumentsFrom what I have read and heard from internal LinkedIn friends, you will only be able to choose the first format that will then be showcased in your Activity section. The others will follow in a pre-determined order decided by LinkedIn. Who knows if we will see complete customization of the order in days, months, or years to come? What I do know is that change is constant in social media.

The Goal Is To Draw More Attention To Your LinkedIn Activity Section

As you can see, the idea is to make your Activity section much more visual, which will help attract eyeballs to your profile. The other obvious and extremely important benefit is that it will also attract attention to you and the content you post on the platform, which is a very important part of connecting with those who are important to you and the growth of your practice.

EDIT: I’ve Added A Video Tutorial For You  

I woke up to this feature today, so I recorded a brief tutorial for you.

 

Nancy Myrland, Legal Marketing and Business Development Advisor to Lawyers

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers grow their practices by integrating the right marketing practices in order to build their reputations and their relationships, which leads to building their practices.

Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, Nancy is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social, and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter, making them more relevant to their current and potential clients.

She is also a personal branding speaker, trainer, and advisor, helping legal and business professionals understand the importance and the impact of defining and reinforcing their personal brand.

Nancy is also the founder of the hybrid self-study and online course, LinkedIn Course For Lawyers, where she personally guides lawyers through the sequential creation of their LinkedIn profile and presence.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, and livestreaming. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

Artificial Intelligence (AI), ChatGPT, & Other Generative Chatbots: Yes or No?

Artificial Intelligence (AI) For Lawyers: ChatGPT & Other Chatbots: Yes or No?

Nancy MyrlandAI - Artificial Intelligence, All Posts, Lawyer Marketing, Legal Marketing Leave a Comment

We are living in a very exciting time with the rise of artificial intelligence (AI) and chatbots.

If AI has been around for many years, what happened to suddenly catapult the chatbot category into outer space?

ChatGPT Was Born

ChatGPT is what happened. At the end of November 2022, OpenAI launched its chatbot, ChatGPT, as a conversational research and content tool that the everyday consumer could use. Other than the need to register for the waitlist, most human beings could type a query and have ChatGPT provide an answer in a full, conversational, seemingly comprehensive manner.

We didn’t have to know how to code, be employed in the IT department, be trained as a developer, or be a paying customer of an existing AI tool to type a query and receive an answer within seconds. This is no-code development at its finest.

The barriers to entry were virtually nonexistent, which is the key to mass acceptance, usage, adoption, and innovation.

Many Different Schools of Thought About The Use of AI Chatbots

There are many who are skeptical, or who suggest we exercise caution when using the chatbot AI output that answers the “prompts” we give these chatbots. I have also written about plagiarism and other IP issues with AI chatbots, including the need to exercise caution.

There are others who say that is nonsense, and that those who are so afraid that they hold back are going to miss the boat, are going to be left behind, and are going to be sorry because others will advance.

All Is Not Rosy

As with any new product or service that is introduced, there will be challenges. At Google’s recent launch event when they announced the limited Beta of its chatbot, Bard, the output showed incorrect information.

This happened for all the world to see at what should have been a very exciting time for Google. I’m sure it is still very exciting for them, but it also serves as a wake-up call about the accuracy of these new tools that are being rushed out to the marketplace to keep up with competitors and trends.

Factual error at the launch of Google's AI chatbot, Bard

 

The Verge summarized the Google Bard error:

“On Monday, Google announced its AI chatbot Bard — a rival to OpenAI’s ChatGPT that’s due to become ‘more widely available to the public in the coming weeks.’ But the bot isn’t off to a great start, with experts noting that Bard made a factual error in its very first demo.

A GIF shared by Google shows Bard answering the question: ‘What new discoveries from the James Webb Space Telescope can I tell my 9 year old about?’ Bard offers three bullet points in return, including one that states that the telescope ‘took the very first pictures of a planet outside of our own solar system.'”

The Verge goes on to say:

“However, a number of astronomers on Twitter pointed out that this is incorrect and that the first image of an exoplanet was taken in 2004 — as stated here on NASA’s website.

‘Not to be a ~well, actually~ jerk, and I’m sure Bard will be impressive, but for the record: JWST did not take ‘the very first image of a planet outside our solar system,’ tweeted astrophysicist Grant Tremblay.”

Then Came Microsoft’s AI Chatbot, Which Is Fueled By ChatGPT

Soon after, Microsoft announced its limited Beta of its chatbot, which will incorporate ChatGPT data alongside its traditional Bing organic search results. It wasn’t long before I began to read several stories of very odd, incorrect, and even inflammatory output when searches were conducted. BingGPT even released its own secret, internal code name, Sydney, to one user.

No, all is not rosy, but it’s early.

Are You A Luddite?

Don’t be shamed into thinking you are a luddite because you are being cautious.

You can be two things at the same time. You can be innovative, educated, brave, a student, and a tester, and you can also be a realist who knows there are sharp turns and curves that also have to be carefully maneuvered.

With AI, There Is A Happy Medium

As I have posted before, I think this introduction of AI chatbots is different and will catch on. We will see it evolve quickly, looking and sounding more like its users than we can fathom right now.

Will AI Replace You? 

Maybe. Maybe not. Maybe it will just release you to spend time on more revenue generating and client service issues. That would be a gift for you and for your clients, wouldn’t it?

My Recommendation

Be both.

Pay attention. Learn from others who are measured, early adopters.

Jump in, observe, test, try to break things, have fun with it, and imagine how it can make your job more efficient and innovative.

Also:

Don’t feed it garbage. Remember, it is still learning. Be cautious about using its output as the be-all and end-all because mistakes are being made, ChatGPT’s Internet data is currently only through 2021, and the tools are still learning how to act like grown-ups.

Stay tuned & stay alert.

Your Thoughts About AI and ChatGPT and Other Chatbots?

If you would like to comment or add to this discussion, I’d love to hear from you right here on this LinkedIn post. Just scroll down on the post below, and you will be able to comment. Thanks!

Nancy Myrland, Legal Marketing and Business Development Advisor to Lawyers

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers grow their practices by integrating the right marketing practices in order to build their reputations and their relationships, which leads to building their practices.

Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, Nancy is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social, and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter, making them more relevant to their current and potential clients.

She is also a personal branding speaker, trainer, and advisor, helping legal and business professionals understand the importance and the impact of defining and reinforcing their personal brand.

Nancy is also the founder of the hybrid self-study and online course, LinkedIn Course For Lawyers, where she personally guides lawyers through the sequential creation of their LinkedIn profile and presence.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, and livestreaming. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

Should You Copy & Paste Your Law Firm Bio To Your LinkedIn Profile?

Should You Copy & Paste Your Law Firm Bio To Your LinkedIn Profile?

Nancy MyrlandAll Posts, LinkedIn, Social Media Leave a Comment

Setting up your LinkedIn profile is easy, right? You just copy and paste everything from your law firm website bio into your LinkedIn profile.

Done, right?

Not so fast.

Your LinkedIn Profile Is Not Your Website Bio

LinkedIn should not be just another placeholder for your website bio. What do I mean by that? Unlike your website bio, which is, except in a few rare cases, a static bio that doesn’t invite interaction and conversation, your LinkedIn profile is more personal.

I’m not saying your website bio isn’t important. Quite the contrary. As my brilliant friends and website designers and developers over at Great Jakes, Robert and Dion Algeri (two of the nicest people you will ever meet), who have studied websites and visitor behavior extensively for a very long time, tell us that lawyers’ bio pages are the most frequented pages on your website.

Great Jakes and Attorney Bios

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On LinkedIn, that’s different. The dynamic is different.

Your Choice: Blog and/or Video

Below, you will see an abbreviated video version of this blog post. If you are viewing this via email or another syndicated site and don’t see the video, click right here. The blog post continues below.

LinkedIn Has 2 Parts

LinkedIn is made up of what I describe as your profile and your presence. They are equally important, but I’d like you to pay attention to your profile first. After you have completed that, then I would concentrate on your presence. In my live and online course called LinkedIn Course For Lawyers, I teach you how to work on your presence while building your profile, but let’s talk about your profile here first.

You can have a robust, informative profile on LinkedIn, but if your presence is weak, then your LinkedIn experience is incomplete and will likely be disappointing to you. You need a healthy blend of both, meaning a robust profile and a meaningful presence.

First-Person Because This Is “Social” Media

Let’s dive a tiny bit deeper. Let’s say you have a strong profile on LinkedIn. You’ve written it in first-person because this is “social” media where you are talking to your profile visitors. Unless your firm has chosen a more social path for its website bios, your website bio was written about you and calls for third-person language.

When you interact with other people on LinkedIn, whether that is:

  • A comment
  • Clicking on a reaction, or
  • Sending them a private message

Or, when they:

  • Read something you posted
  • Read your LinkedIn newsletter or article
  • Watch your video, or
  • Attend your LinkedIn Live video or audio event

They will often follow you back to your profile to learn more about you. When you have built a robust, approachable profile, you have given them something to learn about you. You’ve let them into your world. You have provided information that will help them learn what they came to learn about you.

What If You’re Social, But Your Profile Is Incomplete?

Let’s look at another scenario. If you interact with other people on LinkedIn, yet you’ve done nothing about your profile to make sure it is as robust as it needs to be in the most important parts that LinkedIn gives us to use, then when they follow you back to your profile and find it is underwhelming and uninformative, what’s going to happen?

They’re probably going to leave because they can’t find what they came for. Like you, most people are too busy to begin digging around to find another link to follow you back to your firm website and bio. They are on LinkedIn for a reason and aren’t likely to leave the site unless you’ve given them a very good reason to do so.

Bottom Line

What I don’t want to see happen is that LinkedIn becomes another place to paste your website bio. I’d like you to build out your profile in first-person with all of the sections LinkedIn gives you. By the way, many of these sections are a bit hidden until you decide you want to add them.

When you blend these two, your profile and your presence, there are three things that can happen.

You can:

  • Build your reputation.
  • Build your relationships.
  • Build your practice.

That’s a pretty compelling combination.

When you are using LinkedIn this way, it is worth your while to spend time on the platform.

Nancy Myrland, Legal Marketing and Business Development Advisor to Lawyers

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers grow their practices by integrating the right marketing practices in order to build their reputations and their relationships, which leads to building their practices.

Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, Nancy is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social, and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter, making them more relevant to their current and potential clients.

She is also a personal branding speaker, trainer, and advisor, helping legal and business professionals understand the importance and the impact of defining and reinforcing their personal brand.

Nancy is also the founder of the hybrid self-study and online courseLinkedIn Course For Lawyers, where she personally guides lawyers through the sequential creation of their LinkedIn profile and presence.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, and livestreaming. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

Lawyers, I'm Going To Make Sales Very Easy For You

Lawyers, I’m Going To Make The Sales Process Very Easy For You

Nancy MyrlandAll Posts, Business Development/Sales, Training in Client Service and Business Development/Sal Leave a Comment

Many cringe when the topic of selling, or sales, comes up. If I told you that you’re in the position of selling every day of your life, does that make your stomach turn?

Your Choice: Blog or Podcast

If you would also like to listen to my 2-minute, 46-second episode of Legal Marketing Moments where this blog post originated, you can either click the green play button below or click here if you are reading this via email. If you prefer to read this via blog post, I have rewritten and expanded upon the podcast as a blog post below for you. If that’s you, keep scrolling.

Lawyers, I'm Going To Make Sales Very Easy For You - Legal Marketing Moments Podcast

Does Your Livelihood Depend On Others?

It’s true. If you are an attorney whose livelihood depends on clients spending money for your services, you are in the business of selling.

I’ve Been Right There With You

My first jobs out of college were in sales, so I’ve been right there with you.

I’ve been through some of the best sales training in the world with a company that used to be called L M Berry. I believe now it’s called The Berry Company. I was sent out of town for two weeks of group and individual sales training before I was ever allowed out “on the streets” for what was, in retrospect, one of the most difficult products to sell, Yellow Pages advertising. No wise cracks from those of you who have never heard of them, okay?

I also sold real estate in a city I had just moved to, Indianapolis, which was incredibly ambitious, don’t you think? Sometimes being young and unaware is a good thing because we learn how to do things we might never have done if we had a few years under our belts and knew enough to question our sanity.

In a related field, I also sold title insurance. I sold to the same people I met while selling real estate, so it was fun. Both of those experiences taught me just enough to be dangerous several years later when we sold our house on our own in only 2 weeks. Yay, me!

You and I Will Always Be In Sales

The truth is, I’m in sales again as I run my own company because I need to talk to you about what I offer and what I suggest for you every day of my life, or at least every day of my life that I’m working. Okay, in reality, most weeks that is 7 days. I’m not bragging, I just tend to use those “in-between moments” that I talk about often, which are those moments when I communicate with others while I’m waiting for something else to happen.

Back to you and back to sales. Even when you aren’t talking to clients and potential clients, you are still selling because your thoughts, attitudes, the way you like to do things, the way you wish others in your life did things, where you want to go to dinner, where you want to hang a painting, what color you want to paint your walls, and so much more often involve making your case to another person. That, my friend, also calls upon your sales skills.

Sales Is Unavoidable, So Let’s Make It Easy, Okay?

We can’t avoid sales, so why don’t we just make it a little bit easier? In fact, I am going to make it A LOT easier. If we’ve been around each other very long, you might have heard me say that I consider it my job to make the complex simple, so here goes.

Knowing you can’t get away from sales, and also knowing that it is your responsibility to be good at sales, let’s talk about how you can do it so that it’s not so intimidating.

How To Sell? The Bottom Line.

 Here it is. This is the bottom line right here.

The key to selling is to stop selling.

What do I mean by stop selling? I mean you can stop worrying about how “selling” yourself and your services, and learn how to ask good questions that you genuinely want to know the answers to. These are not just questions that you’ve been taught because someone told you to ask them, or taught you the proper order in which they should be asked, but natural questions that help you learn what the other person’s business is all about. These are questions that will help you learn what they do every day to make their product, sell their services, or keep their virtual or physical doors open.

Be Inquisitive

If you use this approach, which is very natural and conversational, you might find yourself asking:

  • How they started their company
  • How they got to where they are today
  • Where do they want to go
  • What’s working for them
  • What’s not working for them
  • What worries them the most
  • What excites them the most about going to work every day
  • …and so much more. I think you get the idea.

I can’t tell you exactly what to ask, or in what order. That comes when you become inquisitive, and when you concentrate on listening to every word that is being spoken, vs. worrying about making sure the next words out of your mouth are words that you came to say. That will come if you have listened first and are committed to taking care of and serving your clients.

Maybe You Aren’t The Best Lawyer For Them

When you stop selling and start listening, only then you can adequately even begin to think about what you have to offer that might be remotely interesting or necessary to that other person.

You might even learn that you’re not the best solution, and you have the opportunity to suggest another path, another person, or maybe even another solution. When you do that, that makes you an extremely valuable advisor. It also earns you a great deal of respect because you have put the other person first. Who doesn’t love knowing their advisor has their best interest at heart? I know I do.

The key word there is advisor, which is infinitely more memorable than someone who tries to convince everyone that their solution or their service or their practice area is the only one to choose. That kind of advice often comes back around when that person refers someone else to you down the road, along with a strong recommendation about how you have their best interest at heart.

Bottom Line

The key to selling is to stop selling and start listening.

Be an advisor.

Your time will come.

Additional Sales and Business Development Posts You Might Find Helpful:

Lawyers, This Is How Potential Clients Want You To Approach Meetings With Them

Lawyers, The Competition That Kills You Might Not Look Like You

Sales Is Not A Dirty Word

Nancy Myrland, Legal Marketing and Business Development Advisor to Lawyers

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers grow their practices by integrating the right marketing practices in order to build their reputations and their relationships, which leads to building their practices.

Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, Nancy is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social, and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter, making them more relevant to their current and potential clients.

She is also a personal branding speaker, trainer, and advisor, helping legal and business professionals understand the importance and the impact of defining and reinforcing their personal brand.

Nancy is also the founder of the hybrid self-study and online course, LinkedIn Course For Lawyers, where she personally guides lawyers through the sequential creation of their LinkedIn profile and presence.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, and livestreaming. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

 

Lawyers, What Is Holding You Back From Growing Your Practice?

Lawyers, What Is Holding You Back From Growing Your Practice?

Nancy MyrlandAll Posts, Business Development/Sales, Lawyer Marketing, Motivation Leave a Comment

My husband just had knee replacement surgery on January 16. During the most normal of times, the Ortho docs will warn you that this is one of the toughest surgeries to recover from, more than his 5 meniscus surgeries, the hip replacement he didn’t need (another story for another day), the two rotator cuff surgeries he had, and on and on. Those words of warning are serious, yet there is absolutely no way the reality of the situation can be felt until one is right smack in the middle of all of it.

I said the most normal of times because he had complications…several of them…that resulted in ER visits and a hospital stay. The reason this is significant is that these complications caused him to lose about 10 days of professional physical therapy.

If you’ve been through this surgery, or you know someone else who has, you know that those early days are beyond critical in terms of PT because the body wants to form scar tissue around it to do what it does best, which is to protect itself.

Here’s where you come in.

Fight or Flight?

My close friend, Roy Sexton, just posted on social media that he and the LMA International Board of Directors just finished a 2-day board meeting. Something he said caused me to think of you, and how you and my husband’s knee recovery are very similar.

I know, I know. I’m not a huge fan of using my family’s personal situation to make a point in my business, but Roy’s post made it so obvious to me.

Roy said:

Lawyers, What Is Holding You Back?

“In short, we all live to a great extent in the fight or flight side of our brains, and when we are in that survival mode, there is absolutely no way to grow, be strategic, be truly inclusive, or make a long-term difference in this world.”

The concept of flight or fight is not new, but it is timely and important.

My husband’s job, along with the amazing assistance of a professional Physical Therapist, assisted by my not-so-amazing assistance with the same exercises 2 to 3 times a day, is to move past the scar tissue that has now formed around his knee because it tried to protect that brand new, shiny, expensive device the doctor installed.

The challenge now is that scar tissue grew mostly uninterrupted for 10(ish) days while he was battling other hospital-born (we think) issues. Yes, when we weren’t in the hospital, I forced him to do his home exercises with me, but nowhere near what would have been done had he felt better.

Do You Have Those Same Barriers To Progress? 

When you and I think we can’t do something, or won’t do something that we know will help grow our practices, it might be because we have these thoughts:

  • I don’t know how to do it.
  • I don’t want to do it.
  •  I don’t have time to do it.
  • I don’t want to look silly.
  • I don’t want to make mistakes.
  • I don’t know what to say.
  • I don’t know what to post.
  • I don’t like the way I sound.
  • I don’t like the way I look on camera.
  • Someone else has already done this.
  • Someone else has already broken the news.
  • Someone else is smarter than I am.
  • Someone else is younger than I am.
  • Someone else is more experienced than I am.
  • ….and so many more.

Our Own Version of Scar Tissue Develops

When we allow ourselves to think those thoughts, our own version of scar tissue develops in our brains.

Over time, we convince ourselves these things are true, so we put off what we know we should do. We put off doing the amazing things that will help set us apart and make us memorable, which are those things that draw others to us when they need the kind of help you and I provide.

As time goes by, those thoughts become scar tissue that we then have to fight very, very hard to move past because we have allowed them to become what we think to be true. The longer we wait, the more challenging it is going to be. It might even hurt to make progress because that thought, or those thoughts, are in the way and they don’t seem to be going anywhere anytime soon. We’ve allowed them to take up residence in our brains.

The Path of Least Resistance

We take the path of least resistance, or at least we think it is the path of least resistance because it feels easy to let another minute, hour, day, month, or year go by without doing what we need or want to do to differentiate ourselves.

We take flight in order to avoid the emotions that go along with the thoughts (excuses) I shared above.

It’s Time To Fight

Instead of taking the deceptive path of least resistance and fleeing from the amazing work that I know you can do, I invite you to allow yourself to fight through those barriers, that scar tissue, and to choose to do the things you need to do to grow your practice. There are amazing people around you, and yes, I am one of them, that are here to help you if you don’t know where to start. (That sounded kind of braggy, didn’t it?)

The important thing is to start. Whatever you have to do to make it happen, start.

Is it going to be uncomfortable? Maybe.

Will that discomfort go away? Absolutely.

As I tell my husband when I am pulling his leg back to a position that hurts like heck, this hurts but it is also going to help you get better.

Moving through those thoughts and emotions described above will feel very good down the road. I know it will.

Just like I cheer John on every time he tries to pull his knee back into shape while also feeling intense discomfort, I’ll be here, cheering you on as you fight through your own barriers in your mind, too!

It’s time.

Fight.

Nancy Myrland, Legal Marketing and Business Development Advisor to Lawyers

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers grow their practices by integrating the right marketing practices in order to build their reputations and their relationships, which leads to building their practices.

Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, Nancy is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social, and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter, making them more relevant to their current and potential clients.

She is also a personal branding speaker, trainer, and advisor, helping legal and business professionals understand the importance and the impact of defining and reinforcing their personal brand.

Nancy is also the founder of the hybrid self-study and online course, LinkedIn Course For Lawyers, where she personally guides lawyers through the sequential creation of their LinkedIn profile and presence.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, and livestreaming. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

2023 Legal Marketing Predictions and Recommendations for Lawyers

In 2023, Focus On These Two Things

Nancy MyrlandAll Posts Leave a Comment

Happy New Year to you!

For the past handful of years, when asked to contribute my predictions and recommendations for the next year, my answer has been the same. One of these years it will change, but not quite yet. The tools and techniques change regularly, but for now, these two predictions and recommendations are still at the top of my list.

In 2023, Do More Of This 

The use of voice and video is very important to add to your marketing and business development plans. I’m not suggesting you abandon the written word because that would be odd given I am using that medium right now, but I am suggesting ways for you to amplify your written word even more.

Relationships Will Accelerate

If you want to accelerate your relationships with those who are important to you and your practice, letting people hear your voice will do that. If you want to ramp up that familiarity even more, let them hear your voice and see your face at the same time.

Don’t be intimidated or overwhelmed by the mention of voice and video. The barriers to entry don’t have to be that high. Sure, use others as inspiration, or as a model, but don’t let comparison stop you from moving forward because you think you aren’t at their skill level. They didn’t start where they are now, so don’t put that kind of pressure on yourself. You’ll get there.

Where Should You Start?

Voice: Podcasting is a powerful way to start. Careful and thoughtful strategy and execution are key, but you don’t have to do that yourself. You do have to be committed, though, so take some time to plan.

Video: So many choices, but short, mobile, or what I call “handheld” messages to your audiences would be a good place to start. The barrier to entry is low. You might just need a little training and coaching, but you can get up to speed quickly.

Ramp Up Voice and Video Even More

You can ramp up your voice and video efforts by creating videos on your computer, livestreaming to LinkedIn and other social and digital media, creating webinars and online tutorials and news, or using AI tools to create and edit what you have produced, but you don’t have to start there to see results.

Start With The Basics

I would like to see you become comfortable starting with the basics I mentioned above. If you aren’t sure you have the time or commitment necessary, the only way you are going to know is if you commit to planning and testing one of these channels and strategies for a few months. You might just find that you do have the time and that it isn’t as huge a beast as it might feel right now.

If you don’t take the time, someone else might.

If you don’t make the time now, when will you?

Your Turn

Let me know how you feel about voice and video. Do you use them? Do you have any questions? If you would rather answer privately, you can find me all over social media by searching for Nancy Myrland. You will find all of that information, and a bit more, right here.

Nancy Myrland, Legal Marketing and Business Development Advisor to Lawyers

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers grow their practices by integrating the right marketing practices in order to build their reputations and their relationships, which leads to building their practices.

Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, Nancy is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social, and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter, making them more relevant to their current and potential clients.

She is also a personal branding speaker, trainer, and advisor, helping legal and business professionals understand the importance and the impact of defining and reinforcing their personal brand.

Nancy is also the founder of the hybrid self-study and online course, LinkedIn Course For Lawyers, where she personally guides lawyers through the sequential creation of their LinkedIn profile and presence.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, and livestreaming. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

Should You Personalize LinkedIn Invitations To Connect?

Should You Personalize LinkedIn Invitations To Connect?

Nancy MyrlandAll Posts, LinkedIn, Social Media Leave a Comment

The debate goes on whether or not we should personalize invitations to connect on LinkedIn. Short answer? Yes, I think you always should, and here’s why.

Why Do You Want To Connect on LinkedIn?

There are various reasons you might want to connect with someone on LinkedIn. Your reasons are probably different than my reasons, which are different from the next person’s reasons.

The important factor in making this decision is whether you are connecting the dots to that person, and helping them connect the dots to you. If your intended connection can see no reason why they should be connected to you, you have lost an opportunity to form an important relationship, not to mention you have just done what the majority of people on LinkedIn do, which is to send a boilerplate LinkedIn invitation, which I don’t consider very personal. 

I don’t want you to waste your time when you use LinkedIn or any social media. Connecting the dots with another person helps you to make the best use of your time, as well as theirs as they don’t have to try to figure out how they know you, or to view the invitation as purely transactional, which doesn’t create a bond.

What Happens After You Send A Personal Message With Your LinkedIn Invitation?

Speaking of them connecting the dots back to you, that’s what happens when you send a personalized invitation to connect.

In that personal message that you send, you have said something to them that jogs their memory and helps them understand why you want to be connected to them. It doesn’t have to be lengthy. It just needs to be kind and cordial, just like when you’re meeting anyone you would like to get to know better. 

What happens when you send this personal message with your invitation? The majority of invitees will answer you, which gives you one more opportunity to make a connection and probably a positive impression when you answer with a nice statement, such as:

“Looking forward to staying in touch with you. Hope to see you in the newsfeed. Take care.”

Don’t Sell or Promote Anything At This Stage

When you are messaging at this early stage in your LinkedIn relationship, don’t sell. You shouldn’t even get into your practice area, unless, of course, they ask you. 

Don’t worry. You can nurture your relationship with them in other ways. That’s for another video. 

Your Goal Is To Develop An Ongoing Relationship

If you don’t personalize your invitations to connect, what could happen is that you could connect, if they accept your request, and you might never see that person in your newsfeed, or you in theirs. Again, you’ve lost an opportunity to make an impression by connecting with that person on a more personal level. That is not the best use of your time. 

LinkedIn’s algorithms will show us to each other depending on the kind of contact that we have on a regular basis, plus many other factors. I’m not saying interacting in your private inbox on LinkedIn will have an impact on the algorithms. What I am saying is this is one way to make you more memorable before you ever start to interact in the newsfeed. It is a gift as it helps you create an early bond with that other person that you can then begin nurturing. That is what social networking is all about. 

Many won’t do this, so use this opportunity to practice good social skills by virtually walking up to this person and saying something while shaking their virtual hand. If not, this would be similar to meeting someone at an in-person event, handing over your business card, then walking away.

That doesn’t feel very personal or meaningful, does it?

Nancy Myrland, Legal Marketing and Business Development Advisor to Lawyers

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers grow their practices by integrating the right marketing practices in order to build their reputations and their relationships, which leads to building their practices.

Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, Nancy is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social, and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

She is also a personal branding speaker, trainer, and advisor, helping legal and business professionals in firms understand the importance and the impact of defining and reinforcing their personal brand. 

Nancy is also the founder of the hybrid self-study and online course, LinkedIn Course For Lawyers, where she personally guides lawyers through the sequential creation of their LinkedIn profile and presence. 

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, and livestreaming. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

LinkedIn How To Add Clickable Links To Photos

LinkedIn Will Now Let You Add Clickable Links To Photo and Video Posts

Nancy MyrlandAll Posts, LinkedIn Leave a Comment

LinkedIn is rolling out clickable links in photos and videos in the newsfeed. This will be available on personal profiles as well as on your business page.

This is good exposure for you, so I want you to be ready.

When I first reported on this on my LinkedIn profile last week, I didn’t have this feature. The next day, I had it and was able to test it, which I will show you in a moment.

A Few Details About Clickable Links On LinkedIn

You can now add clickable links to LinkedIn photos & videos on LinkedIn profiles and business pages.

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

You can add a link to an important URL that you would like others to see. Think of articles, downloads, presentations, podcast episodes, blog posts, webinar invitations, organizations you and your firm support, or anything else you think might provide value to your connections, followers, and others who might find your clickable post.

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

The rollout of this feature will allow LinkedIn users to add these photos and videos, along with the clickable link, via mobile. It will be added to the desktop app later this year. You can click on the link via mobile and desktop.

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

I encourage you to think now about the photo and link you would like to test first. Don’t wait for perfection because you will talk yourself out of using this valuable new feature. Test a few different links and media to see what your community appears to be interested in clicking on the most.

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

Remember, you are just like everyone else with this feature. No one starts in the middle. LinkedIn doesn’t even start in the middle. They have to test new features they hope will be successful, too.

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

Examples of Clickable Links In LinkedIn Photos and Videos

To give you inspiration, here are 5 examples from LinkedIn’s announcement.

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

Looks Like Facebook and Instagram Stories

Those of you who are familiar with the Stories format on Facebook and Instagram, and even LinkedIn (RIP, LinkedIn Stories), might think this clickable link post looks a lot like a Story, and you are right. The main difference, and this is significant, is that this link is on media that is in the newsfeed, not hidden in the Stories section. This means exposure could be significant. I will be watching and testing to see how the LinkedIn algorithms feel about external links in the newsfeed.

Instructions To Help You Add A Clickable Link To A LinkedIn Photo

I think you will find the process shown below is quick and intuitive.

Add A Photo: On your home page, click on Add a photo.

How do I add a clickable link in LinkedIn photos

Tap On The Link Icon: Upload your photo from your phone and tap on the link icon at the bottom of the page (sorry, not sorry for the gratuitous selfie with Nick Myrland).

How do I add a clickable link in LinkedIn photos

Add Your URL & Custom Link TextFill in the URL and the link text (description) to help viewers understand what you are inviting them to click on as they need to connect the dots to the time and the risk they are taking clicking on a link that will take them to another site.

Preview Your Link & Click DoneYou will want to take a moment to preview the link so that you can see the URL you have posted is actually opening when clicked on.  After you do that, click Done.

How do I add a clickable link in LinkedIn photos

Add A Comment Explaining What You Are Posting. Don’t forget your hashtags.

How do I add a clickable link in LinkedIn photos

Example of A Clickable Link In A LinkedIn Photo

Thank you for obliging me while I used a picture of my sweet Nickie and me to demonstrate this new feature. After I reported this announcement last week, I found the feature had been added to my LinkedIn account the following day.

You know I had to test it right away. Below you will see a screenshot of the update post I created, which added a clickable link to one of my free resources. In case you are at all interested, if you visit that post here, you can click to receive a copy of my 8 LinkedIn Tips For You checklist.

Let me know what you think.

What link do you think you will share first?

Feel free to tag me when you try this so I can see your great work.

As always, if you need help with LinkedIn strategy, I am always here.

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

 

Nancy Myrland, Legal Marketing and Business Development Advisor to Lawyers

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers grow their practices by integrating the right marketing practices in order to build their reputations and their relationships, which leads to building their practices.

Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, Nancy is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social, and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

She is also a personal branding speaker, trainer, and advisor, helping legal and business professionals in firms understand the importance and the impact of defining and reinforcing their personal brand. 

Nancy is also the founder of the hybrid self-study and online course, LinkedIn Course For Lawyers, where she personally guides lawyers through the sequential creation of their LinkedIn profile and presence. 

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, and livestreaming. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

Can Your Personal Brand Hurt Your Firm's Brand?

Can Your Personal Brand Hurt Your Firm’s Brand?

Nancy MyrlandAll Posts, Branding, Personal Branding Leave a Comment

Let’s talk about building your brand within your firm, and what you might want to think about in order for that effort to go as smoothly as possible.

Let’s say you are a practicing lawyer within the firm and it’s important to you to be out there and visible and building your brand separate from your firm’s brand.

It could be that you are a business professional, yet you still want to build your brand internally and externally.

Are Your Personal Branding Efforts Consistent With The Firm’s Branding Efforts?

Is building a distinct personal brand hard to do within law firms?

I was a part of a great discussion today on Ari Kaplan’s virtual lunch. If you don’t know Ari, you should. I’ve said that before, and I’ll say it again because I think he is wonderful. Anyhow, we were discussing this today, so I thought I would share with you what I shared with the group.

Your Choice: Blog or Podcast

If you would like to listen to my 2-minute, 50-second episode of Legal Marketing Moments where this blog post originated, you can either click the play button below or click here if you are reading this via email. If you prefer to read this via blog post, I have rewritten and expanded upon the podcast as a blog post below for you.

an Your Personal Brand Hurt Your Firm's Brand?

A Good Place To Start

We need to start this discussion by understanding your firm’s brand.

Here are a few branding questions:

  • What has the firm decided it wants to be known for?
  • What is the personality of the firm?
  • How does it deliver its messages and its services, meaning what lawyers and other professionals do for clients, and how does your firm deliver those?
  • What is the culture that the firm wants everybody to see internally and externally?

This Is Where Your Brand Comes Into Play

Once you understand your firm’s brand, you then need to think about whether your personal branding efforts are consistent with all of those factors that go into the firm’s brand (answer the questions above for your own brand).

For example, let’s say your firm is very conservative. They are measured in what they say and do because that speaks to the type of clients you have. The firm might want to be known for being the voice of reason, not flying off the handle, not being too out there, and being very smart and measured.

Alongside your firm’s conservative, smart, measured brand, you will then want to build your personal brand. It doesn’t have to be identical, but it should be complementary.

Perhaps you are way out there. If your firm’s brand is 10 miles an hour, maybe your style is that you want to go 90 miles an hour. You are really out there, and your personality is much more assertive.

Let’s say:

  • You like to crack jokes all the time, or
  • You like to talk about your personal life a lot, which can be a mess sometimes, or
  • You like to get very political, or
  • You like to be controversial

It’s Time For Serious Thoughts and Discussion

I think it might be time to say, you know what? I am in this place, in this firm, at this time, by my choice, for a reason.

I recommend you have a serious discussion or give some serious thought to the notion that you can hurt your firm’s brand. It’s not that the firm necessarily wants to stop you from having your own personal brand. I think it is much more intellectual than that by determining if all of this works together for your good and the good of the firm.

Consistent and Complementary?

Think about the 2 people, 20 people, or 2000 people at your firm. Is there consistency there, or are there blips on the radar in the form of very different personal brands that are not complementary to your firm’s brand that could damage, alter or confuse people about what your firm’s brand is?

Don’t Abandon Your Personal Branding Efforts

I’m not saying that your personal branding efforts are a no-go, but to give them some serious thought. Every now and then, a firm will appreciate this situation as it helps set the tone for what is to come, what might exist in some innovative teams or groups, or a host of many other factors we can discuss.

There might also come a time when your brands collide and there doesn’t seem to be anything that can be done to make everything work as you and your firm wished it would.

I think the steps above are a good place to start this discussion because you can do damage to your firm’s brand.

Important: You can also bolster it with your personal brand, so this discussion is definitely worth the effort.

Additional Personal Branding Posts That Might Interest You

Personal Branding For Lawyers: What Do You Want To Be Known For?

You Damage More Than Your Own Personal Brand With Bad Online Behavior

Branding vs. Positioning: What Is The Difference and Do You Need Both?

In Business, Personal Branding Is Important

Lawyers & Law Firms, Are You Paying Attention To Your Brand?

Personal Branding In The Age of Social & Digital Media

Can Your Personal Brand Hurt Your Firm’s Brand?(the post you are reading)

 

Nancy Myrland, Legal Marketing and Business Development Advisor to Lawyers

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers grow their practices by integrating the right marketing practices in order to build their reputations and their relationships, which leads to building their practices.

Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, Nancy is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social, and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

Nancy is also a personal branding speaker, trainer, and advisor, helping legal and business professionals in firms understand the importance and the impact of defining and reinforcing their personal brand. 

She is also the founder of the hybrid self-study and live online course, LinkedIn Course For Lawyers, where she personally guides lawyers through the sequential creation of their LinkedIn profile and presence. 

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, and livestreaming. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

Lawyers, How To Grow Your Practice - Stay The Course

Lawyers, How To Grow Your Practice: Find The Course, Then Stay The Course

Nancy MyrlandAll Posts, Business Development/Sales, Podcasting, Podcasts & Recordings Leave a Comment

If you’re anything like me, there are times when there is something you want to accomplish, and you just want it to happen now. You wish you could close your eyes or snap your fingers and it would just be done.

Wouldn’t that be nice? I know I would love that!

You know this skill, this practice, this process, or this action will probably help you grow your practice. The challenge is that you’re busy, and it takes time. The tendency is to skip a few steps so that you will get there quicker, or to not do it at all.

Your Choice: Blog or Podcast

If you would like to listen to my 2-minute, 30-second episode of Legal Marketing Moments where this blog post originated, you can either click the play button below or click here if you are reading this via email. If you prefer to read this via blog post, I have rewritten the podcast as a blog post below for you.

What Would Help You Build Your Practice?

Let’s say you would like to:

  • Learn how to use LinkedIn
  • Launch a podcast
  • Win a client’s business
  • Become a better networker
  • Become a more confident presenter
  • …or any other skill or project that you know is probably going to be good for your practice

You Know This Will Help, But Getting Started Can Be Difficult

You’ve been telling yourself this needs to be done because it will help establish and build your reputation and your relationships with your clients and potential clients and other influencers, but starting can be the most difficult because you just want it to happen.

  • If you want to launch a podcast, shouldn’t you just be able to sign up and start recording?
  • Shouldn’t you just be able to get on LinkedIn and be found?
  • Aren’t there one or two things you can do to become a stellar presenter?

You might be wondering if there is a quick way to accomplish this marketing or business development practice that will result in helping people notice you as an informed, intelligent leader in your practice area.

Let’s Step Back A Moment

We need to step back a little bit. This is a message I give myself every once in a while because I tend to do things very quickly. When I get something in my mind, I want it to happen right away. I am able to move through tasks and processes very quickly just because that’s my nature. I’m sure it doesn’t hurt that I’ve owned my own business for 20 years now, which makes it very easy to decide what comes next.

My recommendation to you comes from many years of fighting myself on this and finally getting to the point where I know that I need to give myself the grace and have the patience to go through the steps that I need to go through to be effective at whatever it is I am trying to do.

I Want The Same For You

I want whatever it is you are trying to do to stick and to be sustainable so that it results in helping you accomplish your goals of client and practice development.

Here are 3 suggestions for you:

  1. Don’t take shortcuts unless you have someone skilled in the subject teach you their time-tested and ethical shortcuts.
  2. Learn sequentially. There is typically a reason lessons and processes are in the order they are, which is typically because the next step builds upon the last. Try to not be impatient and skip to the last lesson in a plan, project, tutorial, or online course because it seems that will help you get to the finish line quicker.
  3. Give yourself the grace and the patience to go through the steps needed to successfully build, launch, announce, develop, or teach whatever it is you would like to do.

I Have A Resource For You

If effective use of LinkedIn is one of those tasks or goals you have, I want to make sure you have my free resource:

LinkedIn For Lawyers: 8 Essential Ways To Get Noticed By The Right People On LinkedIn.

This complimentary resource contains 8 best practices for using LinkedIn effectively. Don’t worry, you don’t have to use them all. Just use the ones that are comfortable for you, then test the others when you’re ready.

It also contains a monthly check-off calendar that can serve as a reminder to use these best practices. Having this visual aid will help to remind you to use these best practices, thereby creating very good habits on LinkedIn.

You can get that by clicking on this link or by clicking on the graphic below.

LinkedIn For Lawyers - 8 Essential Tips and Best Practices by Nancy Myrland

Thanks so much for being here!

Take care.

Nancy Myrland, Legal Marketing and Business Development Advisor to Lawyers

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers grow their practices by integrating the right marketing practices in order to build their reputations and their relationships, which leads to building their practices.

Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, Nancy is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social, and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

She is also the founder of the hybrid self-study and online course, LinkedIn Course For Lawyers, where she personally guides lawyers through the sequential creation of their LinkedIn profile and presence. 

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, and livestreaming. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.