Should You Add Video or A Podcast To Your Blog

Should You Add Video Or A Podcast To Your Blog?

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Blogging, Content Marketing, Podcasting, Video Marketing, Videos Leave a Comment

You may be wondering if you should mix things up and swap out some of your blog posts with video, or maybe even a podcast.

Quick Answer: Yes.

This question was posed in a group I’m a part of by someone who said he was thinking about posting video on his firm’s blog now and then.

If you like video, you can watch below. If you prefer reading, feel free to scroll right by the video player to read the blog post.

You Don’t Have To Choose

It’s 2021. You don’t have to choose between them. If we acknowledge that different people have different modes of content consumption, which they do, then why don’t we think about how we can incorporate various forms of media to meet them where they are?

Where Should You Start?

Blog To Video: What does that look like? Well, it can take various shapes. You can write a blog post, then, if you are natural at interpreting that in front of a camera without sounding scripted, then do that. That’s a very challenging thing for some to do, so be careful with this one. You can naturally record the entire blog post on camera, or you can take the five most important points in that blog post and create a conversational video talking about those points. In case you’re curious, people can be coached to become more natural on camera.

Video To Blog Post: Let’s say you are pretty good on camera and you either have someone ask you a question to get started, or you let your viewers know you are going to answer a question that you received. Turn your recording software on, tease the topic, then start talking. Introduce yourself, then get into your answer. Then what you can do is upload that video and have it transcribed. While you’re there, have it captioned, too, because we know for a fact that a large percentage of people are watching video with the sound off, and some are unable to hear your video. Providing captions is a very user-friendly thing to do.

From that transcription, you can turn that into a blog post. You can post it as a transcription the way it came, but you will want to do some cleanup and maybe even reformat it so that it seems more like a blog post.

Video To Podcast: Another approach is to strip the audio from your video and turn that into a podcast. Some people do that but it is not always structured in a podcast format. When you know what you want to say, it doesn’t take that long to re-record your message on audio software and make it sound like a podcast.

Video, Audio, and Blog Post: You can approach this process in any number of ways. It depends on your knowledge, your comfort level, and the resources you have or can find to do all of this. Who’s to say that you don’t end up with a blog post that also has an embedded video player like this one? There are different ways you can host that and embed that in your blog post, including posting it on social media and embedding that social media post there so that they are then also exposed to your social media content.

You could also embed a podcast episode player within that blog post as another method of content consumption.

A Content Buffet

When you offer different formats for your visitors to consume your content, they have a smorgasbord, a buffet, right in front of them, and they can choose the method that works for them at that moment. That may be different at different times for them. Don’t assume that just because someone listens to audio this time, they won’t watch video another time if they are in an environment that’s more conducive to doing so.

Variety Invites Deeper Content Consumption

Don’t assume that just because someone tells you they prefer video or audio that they won’t read as well. I watch the analytics on my blog posts where I have more than one format incorporated into those posts, and the time on site is measurably greater than it is when I publish with the written word alone.

Bottom Line

It’s 2021. We have so many choices in front of us and we can do just about anything we want. It doesn’t have to be one or the other. For your clients, the consumers of your information, your referral sources, media, and anyone else who consumes your content, let’s give them what they want.

Knowing that many people have different ways they like to consume content, why don’t we try to give it to them in the format that they like?

Do What You Can, Then Add On

You don’t have to do all of this at once, or every time. I know you only have so many resources to do this, so start where you can, then add additional formats that give the consumers of your content the format that is most pleasing to them. Watch your analytics to see what is being consumed, if average viewing time increases, if your video and podcast numbers change, and any other changes that are out of the norm.

Don’t give up after trying something different one time. One time isn’t an indication of success or failure. Keep testing and refining…then do that again…and again until you know you are confident you are making the right decision.

As always, let me know if you have any questions. Until next time, thank you so much for spending time with me.

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing ConsultantNancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and video presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

I’m Not Worthy To Put Myself Out There

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Career Development & Education, Motivation Leave a Comment

“I’m not good enough.

“I don’t know enough.”

“There are others who know more than I do about this.”

“What if someone asks a question I can’t answer?”

“I’m not a great writer.”

“I don’t look good on camera.”

“I cringe when I hear my voice.”

Sound Familiar?

Do any of those sound or feel familiar? I want you to know you’re not alone. You don’t have to travel far to find others who suffer from imposter syndrome.

It isn’t a medical condition, but it can make you sick inside, tied up in knots, anxious about putting yourself out there for others to see, hear, and feel.

How Will They Choose You?

Others need to know what you have to offer before they can choose you to help them.

They need to feel confident they are making the right decision when asking for your help.

You need to make their decision easier.

You Should Know

I want you to know:

  • You are good enough.
  • You know enough.
  • There will always be others who know more than you.
  • You will always know more than many others.
  • You will be able to answer the questions.
  • If you aren’t sure, research the data and learn the answers.
  • You don’t have to be a best-selling author to write words that are important to others.
  • Your writing improves with practice.
  • You aren’t the one viewing you on camera. You will always be more critical of yourself than others.
  • You sound much better than you realize, especially when your words are helpful.

Bottom Line

You are more than enough. You can do this. You need to put yourself out there so others can find you.

Give them something that makes their decision easier to choose you over someone else.

Give them you.

Let’s kick imposter syndrome to the curb where it belongs.

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing ConsultantNancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and video presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Lawyers, This Is How To Find More Speaking Opportunities

Lawyers, This Is How To Find More Speaking Opportunities

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Blogging, Content Marketing, Lawyer Marketing, Legal Marketing, Marketing Strategy, Podcasting, Presentation Skills, Social Media, Video Marketing Leave a Comment

The people, companies, and institutions you want to do business with, as well as those who can play a part in helping you accomplish your goals, are your target audiences. They are an important part of the foundation of your marketing and business development plans.

Speaking and presenting to your target audiences is important. It helps you gain exposure to those people, and it helps them get to know you even better. It also helps you build credibility with those audiences because they get to see and hear you while you share your knowledge with them.

That means you need to find ways to speak in front of these people. You need to give presentations and to be invited to the table to do so. Today we’re going to discuss a very important concept that will change the number of speaking opportunities you see coming your way.

If you would like to listen to this in audio form, you can click on the green play button below or click here to listen to the podcast. If you are more of a reader, I have rewritten the podcast as a blog post below.

The following is the podcast rewritten as a blog post for you.

How Do I Find More Speaking Opportunities?

Recently, I saw a question on a legal marketing listserv from a legal marketing professional who said that one of her lawyers wants to speak more, and he wants to get in front of more audiences. She asked for recommendations for him.

Some of our colleagues offered ideas such as:

  • Call your local chamber of commerce. They are always looking for speakers.
  • Contact your bar section. Volunteer to speak in front of other lawyers because they­ could be referral sources.

Several other good suggestions were offered. I observed the conversation for a bit before I offered my advice because it is way too easy for me to offer my two cents, which soon becomes five, and then ten cents. I can’t help it because my brain is wired to serve, and teaching and brainstorming with others are ways I can do that.

It’s Time To Look At This From A Different Perspective

My suggestion was to think about this from a different perspective. First, do all of those things that everyone had already suggested. They are important.

The other thing I recommended she do was to help her lawyer understand that he is in charge of speaking opportunities and that he has control of the number of them that come his way because he can become his own media empire.

How Can You Build A Media Empire?

Media empire wasn’t the exact term I used at the time, but let’s break this down a bit. What does that mean? Well, it means that if you want to get in front of more people than you can take control by strategically using social and digital media to do that.

Don’t wait for somebody to invite you to be a guest on their podcast, or to give a presentation to a nonprofit, a business, or a trade association. If you want to get in front of those people, put yourself in front of those people.

Tell Me The Ways

How do you do that? There are a number of ways you can do that, but first, you should have an idea what you want to talk about. If you and I sat down right now, and I asked you:

  • What are the five things you would love to talk to your target audiences about?
  • What messages do you wish they knew about your practice area?
  • What topics are they concerned about?
  • What developments should they be watching carefully?
  • What challenges are looming?

I have a feeling it would be very easy for you to come up with five or ten ideas about what you would like to say that might be helpful to your audiences. In the process of publicly answering those questions, you would be demonstrating your knowledge. You don’t have to answer all of those ideas in one sitting. Spread them out.

Different Ways To Get In Front Of The Right Audiences

Once you have these five or ten topics, or more if you are on a roll, then those can become the topics to communicate on whatever social or digital media platforms make the most sense for your target audiences.

One way is via a podcast, either yours or someone else’s. You could share your ideas on LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, or Snapchat.

You can write it in a blog post. If you want to dabble in video, you can create short videos on Stories on Facebook, Instagram, and now we have Stories on LinkedIn. If you don’t have them, you’re going to. I’ve been testing them for the past few weeks or so. Stories are simply fifteen or twenty second videos that you place on those platforms. Again, this is very short form content.

Stories go away in 24 hours so you don’t have to worry about them if you’re not really excited about how they turned out. All you have to do is hold your phone or put it in a clamp. There are inexpensive desk clamps that will help provide a steady shot.

With pre-recorded videos, you can secure your phone in a clamp or you can hold it, then press record and talk for a couple minutes about one of these five or ten points that you identified as being important to your clients, your prospects, your referral sources, and any other target audiences you have chosen.

Just upload them right from your phone and add a comment. Preface what you’re uploading and say something simple like: “I want you to know about {Topic A}. There are 2 quick things you need to know about it today.”

Be Consistent If You Want To Make A Lasting Impression

If you do what I have mentioned on a consistent basis, then you are going to get more mileage than if you wait to get invited to speak in front of groups. Don’t abandon that effort because those are important, but know that there are only so many of those opportunities to speak and to give presentations.

If I waited to be accepted to speak in front of my international association at its annual conference as the primary way to help my clients understand what they need to know, I could be waiting years, which is not good for them, or for me. There is a finite number of opportunities, so I need to take control of my message and create my own opportunities.

Give Yourself Permission To Take Control

You also need to take control of this and start sending your own messages and creating your own opportunities. Write down those topics that you would like to talk to people about and then decide whether or not you would like to communicate them via the written word, the spoken word, or via video.

Again, don’t sit back and wait for other people to give you a chance to present. Become your own media producer and decide that you are going to post and control your messages and your presentations to your target audiences.

Again, continue to try to get in front of groups to present to them in more traditional ways, because that is important and is a good idea. Right now, that is a little challenging because communication has become primarily virtual. Meetings and conferences are going through a transition. Don’t give up on those but take control and send your own messages.

Create Your Own Opportunities

  • Look at this from a different perspective.
  • Don’t wait for others to invite you.
  • Become your own media empire.
  • Learn various ways you can send your own message.
  • Be consistent to make a lasting impression.
  • Take control.
  • Build your own media empire.

Okay, it doesn’t actually have to be an empire, but you know what I mean.

Please do me a favor and let me know your thoughts about this topic.

Thank you so much for being here today. I know your time is valuable, so I appreciate you spending a little bit of it right here with me.

Until next time, take care.

Do You Need Coaching In How To Do All Of This?The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP is coming soon!

If you are interested, I would love to have you sign up to be notified when I am ready to launch The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP.

I’m very excited about this as this is my new online training and coaching membership and community for lawyers to work on personal branding, social and digital media, identification of target audiences, planning content for all of those target audiences, and so much more in an effort to establish and nurture relationships and grow your practice, which has never been more important.

We will also work closely on your LinkedIn profile and presence with the goal of finding those with whom you want to do business, being found by those people, and turning your contacts into true connections.

Because I know your schedule is full, there will be bite-sized, easy-to-follow online lessons, live coaching and Q & A sessions, a safe, welcoming community, and gentle nudging and encouragement delivered by me in a non-intimidating, supportive atmosphere.

I am known for making the complex simple and understandable, so I would love to have you join me.

Please message me or visit this link to be notified when I am ready to welcome Founding Members. When I open LMAC VIP, it will only be for about a week or two as I then want to direct my attention to completely serving my Founding Members in the best way possible.

There is no obligation. I will notify you, then you can make the decision from there.

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing ConsultantNancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and video presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Lawyers, How To Write Content People Want To Consume

Lawyers, How To Write Content People Want To Consume

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Blogging, Content Marketing Leave a Comment

Lawyers, you write every day, but when it comes to writing content that people actually can and want to consume, writing for others can sometimes stop you in your tracks because you aren’t sure what to say and how to say it.

That’s what I’m going to cover in this brief video and related post.

If you would rather read, you can keep scrolling as the blog post is right there for you.

Let’s Talk About Best Practices

One of the first things you should keep in mind is the most obvious: You are writing for other people.

When it comes to creating content for others, it is important to remember that consumers of that content aren’t necessarily as knowledgeable in your practice area as you are because they didn’t spend all of the years studying and using the same language as you now use every day as a normal part of your lexicon.

They might use different words to describe what you do, what the issues are, and what they need to be concerned about.

What Language Do They Use?

Knowing that you are not writing for you, and that you aren’t even necessarily writing for other lawyers, you should back up and ask yourself:

  • What are the terms that people understand?
  • What language do the majority of the people, your clients, potential clients, and referral sources who don’t always understand what it is you’re talking about, use when they discuss their challenges?
  • What kind of terminology do media sources use? What search terms might they use when looking for an expert to contribute to content they are creating?

Create Keywords

When I conduct LinkedIn training, one of the very first things I talk about with a lawyer is the identification of keywords and key phrases that speak to all of the audiences mentioned above.

These are keywords that you are known for, or that you want to be known for, as well as terms that are important to your target audiences. What are the basic terms that they use when they talk about this matter?

Those will serve you in every way. They serve the lawyers I train on LinkedIn throughout their entire LinkedIn profile, as well on in every piece of content they create.

They will also help you so that when you’re trying to figure out what to blog about, what to write a LinkedIn article about, what updates to write, share, or react to on LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, or Facebook, what to record in your next podcast episode, and even what to use when you create video, whether that be recorded or live.

Make The Complex SimpleWhen blogging, keep it simple

Always remember that you know your practice area 50 times, even 100 times better than anybody else does so, when creating content, you have to do what I often say is one of my primary responsibilities and goals, and that is to make the complex simple.

I think that is one of your jobs, too. You need to make the complex simple for others who are consuming you, your knowledge, and your content.

Ask Your Readers

If you don’t know those keywords, then just ask or read comments that your target audiences are using when they write or when they post on social media. You can also call them and ask them. You can email them and ask them. People want to be helpful. They want to be brought into your fold.

If that is uncomfortable, we can work on those in The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP. They are not difficult to identify, but they sometimes need dedicated time and a bit of guidance. Either way, know that they are an extremely important foundational step in the creation of content that others want to consume.

Give A Spoiler AlertFirst, tell them what you're doing to tell them

Always remember that it is important to keep it simple. Tell people up front what it is you’re going to talk about.

It is almost like giving a spoiler alert. Tell them in the first paragraph what you are going to discuss, then spend the middle of your piece of content making the case and backing up that first point.

Make It Easy On The Eyes

Another best practice when you are writing is to give readers a lot of white space. As I discussed here, let your content breathe.

Our eyes are not trained to read an entire clump of copy on a page, whether that is your LinkedIn profile or whether it is a blog post, whatever that might be. If we go to a page and we see a lot of content that is just jammed together, and this can even be in a simple social media post, our eyes do not gravitate toward that content. We give up on it because it is hard to look at. So, my recommendation is to break that up into much smaller paragraphs.

Some people break up every sentence into a paragraph. Be careful about that because, in a blog post, there are some sentences that, for effect, should stand alone in a paragraph, but probably not always because it can start to look a little gimmicky if you do that on every paragraph or every sentence.

Skimmers appreciate this structure because it is much easier to skim a page and read your content when their eyes see white space in between paragraphs, so make sure you do that.

Take Time To SummarizeBest practices for lawyer blogging

I want you to end your blog post or your content by summarizing what you talked about. Again, consider using bullet points when you do that because, again, for those who skim, bullet points are very easy to view.

Let’s say somebody goes to your blog post and reads your first paragraph. Using the structure I discussed above, they will discover what you are going to talk about. Then, maybe their eyes drift down to bullet points that summarize your blog post. That’s great. Then you’ve at least given skimmers a snapshot of what you’ve talked about in the rest of your blog post or article.

Sometimes that leads people back into your blog post or your article, and they will read more. If not, you’ve lost nothing because you gave your skimmers what they came for, haven’t you?

So let’s make it very easy for them.

Give Them Your Details

At the very end, one of the last things I want you to do is to put a photo and a mini-bio about you with a link back to your bio or your website. It is important to tell people about you because people who don’t know you are going to land on your content.

If you don’t tell them who you are, some people will never know because they might have just seen this link to your blog post or article out in the wild somewhere. Help them out by letting them know who you are. It is not bragging. They have chosen to consume your content.

I always say that, if people have chosen to consume your content, let’s tell them what you do, who you are, who you help, and a little bit more about you, and then give them a link or some contact information.

To Summarize

Those are the basics about how you should consider writing content that is easy to consume.

  • Create keywords
  • Make the complex simple
  • Ask your readers
  • Give a spoiler alert
  • Make your article or blog post easy on the eyes
  • Take time to summarize (hint, hint…just like I’m doing right here)
  • Give them your details

Do me a favor and let me know when you write something. Also, let me know if this makes the writing process a little bit easier to understand.

Thank You

I know your time is valuable, so thanks for stopping by for a few minutes.

Take care.

Opening SoonThe Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP is coming soon!

If you or any lawyers you know would like to grow your practice through carefully planned, sequential coaching and training on personal branding, social media, and content creation on a monthly basis, I would love to have you as a Founding Member of The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP!

Because I know your schedule is full, there will be bite-sized online lessons, live coaching and Q & A sessions, a safe, welcoming community, and gentle nudging and encouragement delivered by me in a non-intimidating, supportive atmosphere.

I am known for making the complex simple and understandable, so I would love to have you join me.

Please message me or visit this link to be notified when I am ready to welcome Founding Members. When I open LMAC VIP, it will only be for about a week or two as I then want to direct my attention to completely serving my Founding Members in the best way possible.

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing ConsultantNancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and video presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Lawyers, Should You Automate LinkedIn?

Lawyers, Should You Automate LinkedIn Activity?

Nancy Myrland All Posts, LinkedIn, Social Media Leave a Comment

Occasionally, someone will ask me if they should use one of the automation services that help automatically find connections, send invitations, then engage in initial conversations on LinkedIn.

These are not real conversations, but machines and bots that represent you.

People are busy, so I understand why it might be tempting to automate activity on social media.

I have strong feelings about these automated services, so let’s talk about them.

Listen or Read: It’s Your Choice Below

If you would like to listen to this via audio, you can click on the green play button in the player below. If you don’t see that, just click here. If you are more of a reader, you will find the blog post directly below the podcast player.

Enjoy!

Brand Consistency

This is an important discussion for us to have because, as lawyers and professionals, this has an impact on being consistent with your brand, not to mention the way you choose to do business.

What Is Your Brand?Lawyers, what is your personal brand?

Your brand is many things, and we could go into detail in LMAC VIP about what yours is specifically, but the foundation of your brand is that you follow the law. Your brand is that you help others follow the law, that you are proactive, and that you help clients to be proactive so they and their companies stay out of trouble. You help solve problems. You help others take the right steps. You protect them.

In my business, it is my responsibility to help lawyers and legal marketers take the right steps. Bots and automation are growing. I am getting way too many automated messages in my inbox on LinkedIn that are sloppy, incorrectly targeted, way too abrupt, and “salesy.”

Actually, getting even one automated message sent by a bot is one too many for me.

Violating LinkedIn’s Terms of ServiceAutomation is against LinkedIn's Terms of Service

You should know that these bots search LinkedIn profiles to look for keywords that users identify. The bot then sends an invitation to connect, complete with a message that is often off base and insincere.

I don’t think you should ever use these services. If the empty approach of using a machine to automate networking and business development activity pretending to be you does not leave you cold, perhaps it will seal the deal if you know that using bots is against LinkedIn’s terms of service.

Here is the section of LinkedIn’s TOS for you to review, but let me save you a little time. Below you will see the screenshot of section 8.2m under LinkedIn “Dos and Don’ts,” which states:

  • Use bots or other automated methods to access the Services, add or download contacts, send or redirect messages;

LinkedIn's Terms of Service Using Bots and Automation To Engage

Using bots to send messages in the inbox is about as close to violating this term of service as I can find.

Your Account Could Be SuspendedYour LinkedIn account could be suspended

If LinkedIn discovers you are using bots, they could, I am not saying they do in every case, but they could suspend your account. It is not easy to get accounts back. In recent days, I have learned of accounts being shut down more often than in the past. I take this seriously.

Sometimes they are closed for good and you cannot get them back. Sometimes people slide by under the radar and they are never caught. I don’t think that is consistent your brand. I also doubt that is how you want to operate, hoping to slide by and not get caught.

I also know that is inconsistent with the brand of a lawyer who cares about following terms of service and who cares about following the law.

This Is Lazy Marketing, and It Shows

Another reason I don’t want you to use these automated services is that they are sloppy. I can tell almost every time these invitations are not coming from someone who genuinely looked at my profile and wants to connect.

How do I know that? Well, there are telltale signs. Because I work with lawyers, you will find the word lawyer on my profile in several places. These bots scrape profiles across LinkedIn, looking for the word lawyer because, certainly, all who have the work lawyer in their profile must be lawyers, correct?

The other day I got a message in my inbox that said something similar to this:

“I just took a look at your profile and I see that you’re a lawyer, and I’d like to connect with more lawyers here.”

This Time, I Took the Bait and Responded

Oftentimes, I don’t engage in conversation when I know this is happening. I just delete the request to connect because they’ve lost my respect right off the bat when it’s that obvious I’m not a lawyer because I never say anywhere in my profile that I am.

Well, last week I decided to reply. Some bot users choose to have the bot continue to answer, frequently incorrectly, but some choose to take over the conversation when they receive a notification of a reply.

I was pretty civil and said,

“Mmm, thanks, but I’m not a lawyer. Are you using one of the automated bot services?”

He told me he was not, and that LinkedIn Navigator allowed him to automate invitations to connect by using keywords.

Okay.

So I said,

“I have a strong concern about these services because I think they can cheapen one’s brand and they go against LinkedIn’s terms of service.”

After a little back and forth, he messaged,

“Well, it’s just that I’m trying to save time because I have a family and, you know, children at home to educate. So I’m just trying to streamline what I do here.”

My last words to him were,

“I get it. I understand. I would just be very cautious because I don’t think it’s a very good practice.”

I could have taken it further, but that’s not really my brand to be confrontational, and what would I have accomplished by pressing him on the subject?

Also, because, as I sometimes say to myself,

“You know what? It’s not always my job to save the whole world.”

Lawyers, This Will Make You Look Bad

When I hear lawyers talk about this, though, then I have to step in and strongly recommend that you do not use these services because, again, it will make you look bad because it is inevitable that something that bot is doing on your behalf is going to be inaccurate and it’s going to make you look bad.

Shortcuts to Establish RelationshipsAutomating LinkedIn connections is lazy marketing

Using bots is also taking shortcuts to establishing relationships.

Pretending we are operating in a normal (what’s that?) world where we can freely network in person, do you send somebody to a business after hours or another function for you? Do you let them log-in to a client meeting on Zoom with your name and credentials? No, you don’t, because you’re the one out there establishing relationships, and only you can engage in meaningful conversation with someone. Only you will ultimately know if that person is someone with whom you really should be connecting. Also, that kind of behavior would be unethical.

Bottom Line

Automated services are against LinkedIn’s terms of service. If you missed them, see my screenshot and link above.

The legal profession requires you, as well as those who represent you, to adhere to legal terms and terms of service, as well as established ethical requirements, so please stay away from these bots.

I know you want to do better than that. I know you can do better than that.

Opening Soon!The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP is coming soon!

If you or any lawyers you know would like to grow your practice through carefully planned, sequential coaching and training on personal branding, social media, and content creation on a monthly basis, I would love to have you as a Founding Member of The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP!

Because I know your schedule is full, there will be bite-sized online lessons, live coaching and Q & A sessions, a safe, welcoming community, and gentle nudging and encouragement delivered by me in a non-intimidating, supportive atmosphere.

I am known for making the complex simple and understandable, so I would love to have you join me.

Please message me or visit this link to be notified when I am ready to accept Founding Members. When I open LMAC VIP, it will only be for about a week or two as I then want to direct my attention to completely serving my Founding Members in the best way possible.

Thank You

I know your time is valuable, so thank you for spending time with me here today. Take care.

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing ConsultantNancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and video presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Lawyers, In Addition To Being Smart, You Need These 4 Characteristics To Build A Successful Practice

Lawyers, In Addition To Being Smart, You Need These 4 Characteristics

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Business Development/Sales, Lawyer Marketing, Legal Marketers, Social Media, Training in Client Service and Business Development/Sal Leave a Comment

Today, we are going to talk about 4 important characteristics lawyers need to have to be successful. If you would like to listen to this in audio form, you can click on the green play button below or click here to listen to the podcast. If you are more of a reader, I have transcribed the podcast below the player. Enjoy!

[The following is the podcast transcribed for you.]

Lawyers are very smart people. I know this because I’ve worked with lawyers since 1997, first in-house as a director of marketing and then out on my own since 2002.

I have the good fortune to work with many very smart lawyers. Many of you were recruited from law school because of your grades, because of where you ranked in your class, and because you demonstrated your knowledge, and demonstrated you were smart and would be an asset to have in a firm.

Well, sometimes being smart is just not enough. Let’s discuss.

What Do I Mean Being Smart Isn’t Enough?

Having knowledge and a wonderful, great, smart brain isn’t going to carry you through all of the practice and business development that is necessary for a profitable career.

You might get lucky and just being smart gets you through all of it. But there are other characteristics and assets that you need to demonstrate in order to continue to grow a profitable practice.

4 Characteristics You Need To Have

First: You need to be visible. It’s one thing to be smart and to sit at your desk (no matter where that desk is) and to use your brilliant brain.Lawyers, In Addition To Being Smart, You Need These 4 Characteristics

But if you aren’t visible and you’re not demonstrating that to people, and you aren’t making it obvious to people that, yes, you are smart and you have characteristics that are appealing to them, then what is going to cause someone to think about you when they have a need that is within your practice area?

So you need to be visible.

Second: You need to be creative. I know that might make some of you cringe because you’re thinking I didn’t go to law school to be creative, and I get that.

No, you absolutely did not, not in the way that you might be thinking right now. But creativity comes in many forms. Creativity means you’re going to think of doing something different, something that cuts through the clutter, something that may be a little different, or a little bit faster, or more creative than someone else.Lawyers, In Addition To Being Smart, You Need These 4 Characteristics

It might be that you decide that you are going to host a podcast. Podcasts are very much on my mind these days because I’m helping firms with them all the way from conception of idea through launch and marketing, as well as training lawyers on how to record their sessions.

So they are very much on my mind, and you will hear me mention them a lot, but you might be thinking, alright, yes, I can be creative. I will consider launching a podcast.

It doesn’t have to be long and involved. It doesn’t have to be an hour. It doesn’t even have to be 30 minutes. Mine is almost always under ten minutes. You can get in and out. You can get organized and do something creative like that.

It could be that you like video, and you pick up your phone, record a video, create a message to accompany it, something that you know is valuable because of the timing or because it’s an issue that is at hand, so you produce a really nice video, a short video, a message to people. You post that. It doesn’t have to be professionally produced, and there’s nothing wrong with being professionally produced, but you don’t need to do that today.

Think of how you can get creative.

It might only mean that graphically you produce something that is a little bit more creative than the next person so that your message comes across to those who are visual.

Third: You need to be patient. That’s not easy for a lot of us because we want our activity to produce results right now, or at the latest tomorrow, right? We Lawyers, In Addition To Being Smart, You Need These 4 Characteristicsdon’t want to have to keep working at it. We want to see website visits. We want to see listens jump up all of a sudden. We want to see content that has a lot of views on it on LinkedIn. We want to see a lot of activity on our content that we create, we want to see activity and conversation swirling around it because not only does that make us feel good, but it means we might be sharing something valuable.

It takes time, so I want you to be patient and let your tactics play out for a while before you decide whether or not they’re good or they’re bad.

Fourth: You need to be persistent. That goes along with the last point about being patient. You need to continue to do whatever it is you’re doing. If you are hosting a certain type of event and find that attendance was a little lackluster, or maybe the first on

Lawyers, In Addition To Being Smart, You Need These 4 Characteristicse was great, and the next time you do it, it’s just meh, not that many people came and you’re thinking no, I’m done because they only wanted one and nobody’s coming. Nobody’s coming to my party anymore, and they don’t want to listen to me. They don’t want to watch me. They don’t want to read my content. There’s just no activity. So that’s it. I’m going to move on to something else.

What you need to do is be persistent, and you need to continue to remind people that you are the person that is delivering these messages within your practice area.

Sometimes that means you’re also a curator of content. It doesn’t always mean that you are delivering your own content, but that you are curating the intelligence and the insight of other people within your practice area, because that, too, sends a message about you and what you know.

So these four characteristics I am giving you will help complement your intelligence when building your practice.

They are:

  • Be visible.
  • Be creative.
  • Be patient.
  • Be persistent.

I know your time is valuable, so I appreciate you spending some time right here with me.

Please do me a favor and let me know your thoughts about this topic.

Lawyers, Would More Focused, Sequential Training In A Private Monthly Online VIP Community Be Helpful To You and Your Colleagues?

The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP is coming soon!

If you would like to know when I am getting ready to launch my upcoming membership community, The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP, where I will regularly teach and coach in a personal, private community, please let me know here. There is absolutely no obligation as it is simply an expression of interest to receive information when I am ready to launch to “Founding Members.”

In VIP, I will help lawyers who aren’t sure how to use social and digital media by teaching you how to wisely, safely, ethically, and efficiently raise your visibility, develop your brand, nurture your relationships, and grow your practice.

As always, I will make the complex simple.

 

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing ConsultantNancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and video presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

 

 

 

Zoom Tip #2 Head and Eye Placement On Video

[VIDEO TIP #2] Head and Eye Placement For Maximum Connection On Video

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Video Marketing, Videos, Videos-Livestreaming Leave a Comment

Welcome back!

This is Video Tip #2 that will address how to look better when you are on camera by understanding where to place your eyes and your head for maximum impact and connection with the audiences you are talking to when on video.

If you haven’t seen Video Tip #1, you can find that right here.

If we haven’t met before, my name is Nancy Myrland with Myrland Marketing & Social Media. I am a marketing, content, social and digital media advisor for lawyers.

Let’s get started.

Here is my video explaining everything. Just press the play button on that video below.

If you are more of a reader, there is a blog post below that. You get to choose!

The following is a rewritten transcript of the video, which I edited to make it a bit more readable for you.

Where Should You Place Your Head?

Let’s get started with where you should place your head. This also goes for when you are taking still photos, but particularly on video, which is what we’re talking about today. You want your head with only a little bit of space between your head and the top of the frame. You can see what that looks like in the video I have prepared.

When your head and face are further down in the frame, or when you slouch, look at what happens. If you are lower in the frame, you don’t look right. Your presence looks minimized, and you can come across as too casual, less confident, and slouchy. (Is slouchy even a word?)

But when you sit up and fill the frame, which is what we call it, you will have presence. Having your body upright and at the top of the camera is the best placement for your head. It’s just a good look. It’s a better look. For maximum impact, that is where you want to place your head.

Camera Placement

Let’s take a look at camera placement. Most cameras can be adjusted. Mine has a little feature where you can just bend it back and forth. That’s nothing special with my camera. Many external webcams are built this way.

If you have your camera stuck in the fold of your laptop, which is very common these days because they want to make the monitors thin, you will want to lift it up on a box or two so that you are eye level with that camera.

You want your head toward the top, but you don’t want your head at the top but looking down at your camera. That’s not a polished, professional look. Even if your head is at the top, but you’re looking down in the fold of your laptop while trying to connect with others, you can do better by improving the height of your laptop and camera. Again, this is for maximum impact and connection with the people you’re talking to, let’s keep your head up and at the top of the frame, and your camera at eye-level.

Where Should I Be Looking?

Where should you look when you are on video? This can be difficult because when we are in meetings with other people, we want to look at them. Our tendency on all meeting and webinar platforms is to look at ourselves on the screen, or at others in nearby squares. It’s natural.

Here’s my advice for you. It depends on what is going on at that particular moment, but, because I’ve done this so much, it has become a habit for me to look into my lens when I am on camera, and particularly when I’m talking. That is what I would like for you to do, too.

Every time you are talking, you want to make sure you look in the lens, which is what I’m doing in the video that you see on this page.

Why is that important? To best answer that, think about what or who is on the other side of that lens.

Yes, exactly, there are people on the other side of that lens!

Look Into Their Eyes

When I am on camera, I know that you are there, and I want to look into your eyes. I want to have a conversation with you.

I want you to have a conversation directly with those other people who are observing you. When it is your turn to talk, if you are doing what I demonstrate in the video, looking all over your screen at everybody else, depending on how wide your monitor is, and mine is very wide, you will look like you are constantly face-surfing, or trying to look at other faces.

That is not the best practice for maximum connection with the people you are talking to, so when it is your turn to talk, definitely look into your lens. If you need a little help, put a sticky note and an arrow by your lens.

I use one of those little, round, fluorescent-colored Avery reinforcement stickers. I have a bright yellow one at the moment. It is always my reminder that is where the lens is on my Logitech Brio, which is my window to the eyes of the other people in my meeting or webinar.

When it is your turn to talk, definitely look at the camera.

Where Do I Look When Others Are Talking?

If you have said something and someone else is replying to you, or if the discussion involves you, keep looking at the camera.

Why is this important?

Because you are still in conversation with that person, aren’t you, which is why I want you to maintain eye contact. You can still hear that person talk without looking directly at them.

But Not Always

Sometimes the conversation is just a free for all. Everybody is talking. There is a lot going on. At those times, it is much harder to maintain and freeze a look on your camera for the next 30 to 60 minutes, so don’t put the pressure on yourself to have to do that.

In those moments, and in all moments, what helps minimize your eye and head movement is to position Zoom or your webinar window in such a way that you are able to place it right below your lens. In the video on this page, I have positioned my recording software directly below my camera.

If you are on Zoom or in a webinar where you can see others, try not to let your eyes dart back and forth like I demonstrate in the video.

You Are Always On Stage

Remember that you are always on stage. It is your job to look professional when you know there are people watching and evaluating you.

When you are on stage, whether that is in an auditorium, a conference room, or your home office, you are still being evaluated. Keep eye contact as much as you can because you are always being judged by someone, if not some people. I know that’s a lot of pressure, but I have faith in you!

Another reason this is important is to think about what happens when someone is presenting from the stage. Pretend that is you. When you are on an in-person stage, what do you do when you are looking out at the audience?

Who do you look for?

You look for people who are looking at you and who are somewhat in agreement with what you are saying. You look for those who are paying attention, whose body language communicates interest, and who might be nodding. Not nodding off, but nodding in agreement.

It is the same when you are on camera and somebody else is talking. When it is someone else’s turn to talk, what do you think is going to happen? Well, because others are not as informed as you are about looking at the camera, they are looking around at the different people who are in your Zoom room.

Just as they do in-person, they are going to focus on the people who are looking at them and seem to be in agreement with what’s going on. So that means you should always have your camera turned on, and you should genuinely try to make eye contact so the presenter sees you looking at them.

The Gift Of Eye Contact

Now, does looking at the presenter via your lens feel artificial? It doesn’t to me, but that is because I’ve been doing this for a long time and it comes naturally to me. It has become a daily habit. I can still see those people out of the corner of my eye. I can still hear everything they are saying, but I am taking a little extra time to pay attention to them by giving them the gift of my eye contact.

Final Thoughts

Those are my two tips for you today, which are best practices for head and eye placement for maximum impact and connection with your audiences.

If you haven’t watched the video above where I demonstrate everything I have written about here, please do. I’d love to know what you think of it, or if you have any video questions you want me to make sure I cover.

More Focused, Sequential Training In A Private Monthly Online VIP Community

The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP is coming soon!

If you would like to know when I am getting ready to launch my upcoming membership community, The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP, where I will regularly teach and coach in a personal, private community, please let me know here. There is absolutely no obligation as it is simply an expression of interest to receive information.

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom strategy and training. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

[VIDEO TIP #1] One Quick & Easy Way To Look Better On Camera

[VIDEO TIP #1] One Quick & Easy Way To Look Better On Camera

Nancy Myrland Presentation Skills, Video Marketing, Videos-Livestreaming Leave a Comment

Now more than ever, you are being called upon to meet and present on camera virtually. You might also be interested in creating pre-recorded and live video for marketing and business development purposes.

Because you are not physically able to meet with every client and potential client you would like to, not to mention referral sources, media, bloggers, and conference organizers, you need to find the most effective ways to create and nurture your professional relationships with others.

Video helps accelerate those relationship-building efforts because it causes others to feel they know you better because they have seen and observed you.

Video is powerful, so let’s make the absolute best of it, okay?

This 1st Tip Is Important For everyone

The 1st tip I am sharing below is the beginning of a series of video tips I have for you. This one shows you one quick and easy way to instantly look better on camera.

Just press the play button below and you’ll see what I mean.

Let me know what you think and if you have any questions, okay?

The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP is coming soon!

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to maximize business development efforts and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn and Twitter trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement marketing and business development efforts that are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasts, video marketing, voice marketing, flash briefings, and livestreaming. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

If you would like to join Nancy’s waiting list to receive more information when The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP is ready to open to its class of Founding Members, just click here. No obligation, just information!

Are Lawyers Creating Coronavirus Content The Wrong Way?

Are Lawyers Creating Coronavirus Content The Wrong Way?

Nancy Myrland Content Marketing, Coronavirus Communications Center, Crisis Management Leave a Comment

There has been an amazing increase in the amount and types of Coronavirus content being created by lawyers and law firms, as well as the rest of the world. There has also been an increase in the number of people who will freely tell the world you are doing it wrong.

In this unprecedented time we are living in, many are struggling to find the right mix, the right tone, the right platforms, and the right frequency.

In this episode of Legal Marketing Minutes with Nancy Myrland, I discuss the comments I am seeing and hearing and suggest how we all might want to make a few adjustments.

Legal Marketing Minutes is always under 10 minutes. This episode is 8 minutes and 38 seconds.

After you listen, I’d like to hear your perspective.

Click here to listen on Apple Podcasts.

Click here to listen on Spotify.

Click here to listen on the Legal Marketing Minutes Blog.  

I know you’re extremely busy, but if you find the Legal Marketing Minutes podcast worthy of your time, please consider subscribing to, rating, and reviewing my show on Apple Podcasts. I would really appreciate it!

Nancy Myrland, Myrland Marketing & Social Media and LinkedIn Coach For LawyersNancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to maximize business development efforts to grow their practices. Known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook for Business trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement marketing and business development efforts that are more relevant to their current and potential clients. As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcastsvideo marketing, voice marketing, flash briefings, and livestreaming. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Please Visit My Coronavirus Communications Center

Coronavirus Communications Center for Law Firms with Nancy Myrland

In The Coronavirus Communications Center, You Will Find These Posts Related To The Coronavirus (COVID-19)

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Should Employees Volunteer During The Coronavirus (COVID-19) Crisis?

Nancy Myrland Coronavirus Communications Center, Crisis Management, Management Leave a Comment

What should you do if someone in your firm comes to you seeking approval to provide volunteer assistance in the community during this COVID-19 outbreak?

Even if you haven’t received any requests, I am going to share an idea for you to implement in your firm that might also turn into a morale builder.

Is It Time To Volunteer Outside The Box?What should you do if someone in your firm comes to you seeking approval to provide volunteer assistance in the community during this COVID-19 outbreak? Is It Time To Volunteer Outside The Box? With all of the restrictions being imposed upon most states right now, this might be the time to think outside the box to help those who are looking for something tangible to do to make things better. I’ve drafted some thoughts you can modify for your own use in your firms. There are spots only you can fill in. You’ll see what I mean below. How To Handle Volunteerism The Coronavirus Crisis? Here is a suggestion for you to consider, as well as a memo you can distribute internally when this question arises. Feel free to copy and edit it to match your style and culture. “Dear [___________], As you know, for decades our firm has believed in nothing short of selfless and compassionate community service and volunteering. This is made evident by the policy we have to allow everyone in the firm [X number] of paid volunteer hours per month. Our community involvement is one of the cornerstones of our firm. Some of you have asked if you would be able to continue to contribute that same volunteer spirit during this Coronavirus crisis by going outside of your homes and offering your assistance to those most in need. I have a few thoughts for you. Number one, you are amazing. Number two, given the fact that most states have already limited travel outside of the home to those providing or who need essential services, unless you are one of those providing or need those services or supplies, I would ask that at this time you pass on physically volunteering to help in our communities. As difficult as this is for those of us who feel the need to do something to help right now, we must balance that with the need to flatten the curve, meaning to reduce the spread of this insidious virus by keeping ourselves out of harm’s way. What I would like to offer is the ability for you to donate up to [$200] per person to give to the local organization you think best fits your and our passions and priorities. We will reimburse you for that contribution. When this crisis passes and state and federal government tells us that the reality of being carriers or victims of this virus has passed and physical distancing is no longer necessary, we will then happily revert to our normal volunteer policy which is [10] hours of approved volunteer time per month or quarter. Please keep me in the loop as you donate to local organizations that are consistent with your and our values as a firm because I would love to hear your stories. Either way, make sure you turn in an expense report to be reimbursed for those donations you will be selflessly donating on your and our behalf. Nothing will make me happier than when we return to a time when we can resume our traditional way of giving in this firm. It will happen. It is our way of life. I suspect it will become even stronger as a result of what we are all going through right now. If you have any questions at all, or any suggestions about how to make virtual volunteering like this even more effective, please do not hesitate to call, email, or text me. Thank you. Stay safe. [Pat Sampson, Managing Member]” If you'd like to discuss this in greater detail, this is where you can find me. Nancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to maximize business development efforts to grow their practices. Known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook for Business trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement marketing and business development efforts that are more relevant to their current and potential clients. As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasts, video marketing, voice marketing, flash briefings, and livestreaming. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases. If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here. Please Visit My Coronavirus Communications Center In The Coronavirus Communications Center, You Will Find These Posts Related To Coronavirus (COVID-19)

With all of the restrictions being imposed upon most states right now, this might be the time to think outside the box to help those who are looking for something tangible to do to make things better.

I’ve drafted some thoughts you can modify for your own use in your firms. There are spots only you can fill in. You’ll see what I mean below.

How To Handle Volunteerism The Coronavirus Crisis?

Here is a suggestion for you to consider, as well as a memo you can distribute internally when this question arises. Feel free to copy and edit it to match your style and culture.

“Dear [___________],

As you know, for decades our firm has believed in nothing short of selfless and compassionate community service and volunteering. This is made evident by the policy we have to allow everyone in the firm [X number] of paid volunteer hours per month. Our community involvement is one of the cornerstones of our firm.

Some of you have asked if you would be able to continue to contribute that same volunteer spirit during this Coronavirus crisis by going outside of your homes and offering your assistance to those most in need.

I have a few thoughts for you.

Number one, you are amazing.What should you do if someone in your firm comes to you seeking approval to provide volunteer assistance in the community during this COVID-19 outbreak? Is It Time To Volunteer Outside The Box? With all of the restrictions being imposed upon most states right now, this might be the time to think outside the box to help those who are looking for something tangible to do to make things better. I’ve drafted some thoughts you can modify for your own use in your firms. There are spots only you can fill in. You’ll see what I mean below. How To Handle Volunteerism The Coronavirus Crisis? Here is a suggestion for you to consider, as well as a memo you can distribute internally when this question arises. Feel free to copy and edit it to match your style and culture. “Dear [___________], As you know, for decades our firm has believed in nothing short of selfless and compassionate community service and volunteering. This is made evident by the policy we have to allow everyone in the firm [X number] of paid volunteer hours per month. Our community involvement is one of the cornerstones of our firm. Some of you have asked if you would be able to continue to contribute that same volunteer spirit during this Coronavirus crisis by going outside of your homes and offering your assistance to those most in need. I have a few thoughts for you. Number one, you are amazing. Number two, given the fact that most states have already limited travel outside of the home to those providing or who need essential services, unless you are one of those providing or need those services or supplies, I would ask that at this time you pass on physically volunteering to help in our communities. As difficult as this is for those of us who feel the need to do something to help right now, we must balance that with the need to flatten the curve, meaning to reduce the spread of this insidious virus by keeping ourselves out of harm’s way. What I would like to offer is the ability for you to donate up to [$200] per person to give to the local organization you think best fits your and our passions and priorities. We will reimburse you for that contribution. When this crisis passes and state and federal government tells us that the reality of being carriers or victims of this virus has passed and physical distancing is no longer necessary, we will then happily revert to our normal volunteer policy which is [10] hours of approved volunteer time per month or quarter. Please keep me in the loop as you donate to local organizations that are consistent with your and our values as a firm because I would love to hear your stories. Either way, make sure you turn in an expense report to be reimbursed for those donations you will be selflessly donating on your and our behalf. Nothing will make me happier than when we return to a time when we can resume our traditional way of giving in this firm. It will happen. It is our way of life. I suspect it will become even stronger as a result of what we are all going through right now. If you have any questions at all, or any suggestions about how to make virtual volunteering like this even more effective, please do not hesitate to call, email, or text me. Thank you. Stay safe. [Pat Sampson, Managing Member]” If you'd like to discuss this in greater detail, this is where you can find me. Nancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to maximize business development efforts to grow their practices. Known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook for Business trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement marketing and business development efforts that are more relevant to their current and potential clients. As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasts, video marketing, voice marketing, flash briefings, and livestreaming. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases. If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here. Please Visit My Coronavirus Communications Center In The Coronavirus Communications Center, You Will Find These Posts Related To Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Number two, given the fact that most states have already limited travel outside of the home to those providing or who need essential services, unless you are one of those providing or need those services or supplies, I would ask that at this time you pass on physically volunteering to help in our communities.

As difficult as this is for those of us who feel the need to do something to help right now, we must balance that with the need to flatten the curve, meaning to reduce the spread of this insidious virus by keeping ourselves out of harm’s way.

What I would like to offer is the ability for you to donate up to [$100] per person to give to the local organization or cause you think best fits your and our passions and priorities.

We will reimburse you for that contribution.

When this crisis passes and state and federal government tell us that the reality of being carriers or victims of this virus has passed and physical distancing is no longer necessary, we will then happily revert to our normal volunteer policy which is [10] hours of approved volunteer time per [quarter].

Please keep me in the loop as you donate to local organizations that are consistent with your and our values as a firm because I would love to hear your stories.Should Employees Volunteer During The Coronavirus (COVID-19) Crisis?

Either way, make sure you turn in an expense report to be reimbursed for those donations you will be selflessly donating on your and our behalf.

Nothing will make me happier than when we return to a time when we can resume our traditional way of giving in this firm. It will happen. It is our way of life. I suspect it will become even stronger as a result of what we are all going through right now.

If you have any questions at all, or any suggestions about how to make virtual volunteering like this even more effective, please do not hesitate to call, email, or text me.

Thank you. Stay safe.

[Pat Sampson, Managing Member]”

Let Me Know How I Can Help You

If you’d like to discuss this in greater detail, this is where you can find me.

Nancy Myrland, Myrland Marketing & Social Media and LinkedIn Coach For LawyersNancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to maximize business development efforts to grow their practices. Known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook for Business trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement marketing and business development efforts that are more relevant to their current and potential clients. As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcastsvideo marketing, voice marketing, flash briefings, and livestreaming. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to engage Nancy for an hour to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Please Visit My Coronavirus Communications Center

Coronavirus Communications Center for Law Firms with Nancy Myrland

In The Coronavirus Communications Center, You Will Find These Posts Related To Coronavirus (COVID-19)

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