3 Ways To Become A Better Networker

3 Ways To Become A Much Better Networker

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Business Development/Sales, Networking Leave a Comment

Have you ever met someone and asked them a question about what they do, or how they are, or what their opinion is about a subject, then find they get so wrapped up in what they are saying that they never stop to say:

“How about you? What do you think?”

“What about you? What do you do?”

“How are you doing?”

This happens frequently.

Some People Are Wired Differently

People get so wrapped up in their own thoughts and answers they forget to reciprocate. They might lack the confidence to know how to stop for a moment and bring you into their world by asking for your opinion. They might even feel awkward and not know how to ask.

It’s sad to say that a few might not even care what you think because they are accustomed to being the one everyone wants to meet and hear from.

I have even experienced the charming phenomenon of having someone talk to my husband without ever looking at me, except for the 10 seconds when I am asking a follow-up question or two about a comment made that I obviously care about. They answer my question by looking at him.

3 Suggestions That Will Help You Network More Effectively

Even if it doesn’t come naturally to you, you can learn these skills that make networking much more meaningful to you and to the other person.

Here are a few suggestions:

  • Take the time to listen and ask natural follow-up questions.
  • If you are answering another person’s question, stop now and then to ask that person what they think.
  • Look at that person when they are talking. Even if you feel terribly insecure, you might make the other person feel you are disinterested if you are looking away.

By the way, these networking skills and suggestions apply to both online and in-person networking. They are slightly nuanced, but the principles are the same. I talk about that here in LinkedIn Course For Lawyers. 

Suggestions From My Networking Colleagues and Friends

I appreciate these networking suggestions that were shared with me last week when I first began to discuss this topic on LinkedIn.

First, Jennifer Forester:

Jennifer Forester Networking Recommendation

 

 

 

 

 

…and another from Sandra Long:

Sandra Long networking suggestion

 

 

 

 

 

Show Others They Are Valuable

When you show these common networking courtesies, you cause the other person to think they matter, that their opinion is just as valuable as yours, and that you truly want to learn about them.

Look for ways to bring others into your fold, into your world, and into your conversation. These skills help build the relationships that matter and that bind people together.

Have you been the recipient of any of the practices I described above?

Registration For “LinkedIn Course For Lawyers” Is Now Open!

Registration for LinkedIn Course For Lawyers Is OpenWhile you’re here, I want you to know that registration for “LinkedIn Course For Lawyers” is open through April 15! I am excited about this as it has been in the works for more than 5 years…okay, 10. I haven’t been working on it that long (that would be silly), but I’ve been planning on doing it for that long.

Registration for Founding Members at a special Founding Member price will be open through April 15, then I will not offer the course again for a while because I will be working closely in live and recorded training with my students and other consulting clients to help them turn LinkedIn into the reputation, relationship, and business development tool that it is.

I hope you and your colleagues will join me. Here is where you can find additional details about LinkedIn Course For Lawyers.

 

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and virtual presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Why Won't Publications Ask You For A Quote

Why Won’t Publications Ask You For A Quote?

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Content Marketing, Lawyer Marketing, Social Media Leave a Comment

Wouldn’t it be nice if you could get the trades and business publications to write about one of your recent matters or accomplishments?

Wouldn’t it be nice if your name was included when your client’s merger was discussed in the news?

Wouldn’t it be great if your local business journal acknowledged what you and your firm are doing in the community?

Wouldn’t it be nice if you were called as a source when stories were written about recent developments in your practice area?

Wouldn’t it be nice if your clients, referral sources, and colleagues quickly thought of you when asked for recommendations for someone like you?

Journalists Won’t Always Remember You

Of course, it would be nice, but human beings are who they are. They don’t always remember that you are who you are and that you have the talent they need or want.

They have a lot of people to remember. They have a lot of assignments on their desk.

This is why you need to take control of your message.

Become Your Own Publisher

You need to become your own publisher and media source. Don’t wait around for others to write about you, or to include your name in stories about matters you know they should know you are connected to because you’ve been working on them so hard for so long.

3 Ways You Take Control Of Your Own Message

  • Make sure you are commenting on social media posts that others are discussing. This subtly shows your knowledge. If it is someone you perceive to be a competitor, be careful about not hijacking their posts as that can come across as a bit desperate and inconsiderate. Choose wisely.
  • Make sure you have an updated bio on your website and a robust profile on LinkedIn so there is no question what you do. If you use other social media, make sure those profiles are updated, too. Don’t forget that media spend time searching Twitter for sources.
  • Make sure you are regularly writing articles and blog posts that demonstrate your passion for those topics your clients care about. Few practices demonstrate your deep knowledge more than covering it on a regular basis. Content like this lives on even after social media posts float away into the algorithmic abyss.

Choose You

Be your own media and publisher. Don’t wait for anyone else to tell your story.

Don’t wait to be chosen.

Choose yourself.

Until next time…

My LinkedIn Course For Lawyers Is Opening!

LinkedIn Course For Lawyers with Nancy MyrlandWhile you’re here, I want you to know that registration for “LinkedIn Course For Lawyers” is a few days away from opening! I am excited about this as it has been in the works for more than 5 years. I haven’t been working on it that long (that would be silly), but I’ve been planning on doing it for that long.

I will open registration for Founding Members at a special Founding Member price for about a week, then I will not offer the course again for a while because I will be working closely in live and recorded training with my students and other consulting clients to help them turn LinkedIn into the reputation, relationship, and business development tool that it is.

I hope you and your colleagues will join me there. Here is where you can find additional details about LinkedIn Course For Lawyers.

 

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and virtual presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Burger King's BIG Twitter Mistake: Lessons Learned

Burger King’s BIG Twitter Mistake: Lessons Learned

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Crisis Management, Social Media, Twitter Leave a Comment

In case you were too busy yesterday to notice the Internet blowing up about Burger King’s social media misstep, let’s take a moment or two to help you catch up, and for me to share my perspective on the situation so that we can all learn from this situation.

We all need to be very careful about being clever on social media. Even if you are the most beloved brand in the world, and I’m not saying Burger King is, but one short Tweet can get you in a lot of hot water…or grease in this case.

Burger King Tweeted this on Monday morning, March 8:

“Women belong in the kitchen.   — @BurgerKingUK”

Burger King International Women's Day Tweet

Nice, huh? Not so much.

Burger King Had Great Intentions

Well, it seems they were trying to cleverly tee up their news about their efforts to provide scholarships to the women who work at Burger King restaurants, which would allow them to move up the ranks to become chefs and head chefs in the industry.

Congratulations on that scholarship effort.

Congratulations on launching it on International Women’s Day.

That is where my congratulatory feelings end.

This isn’t an attack on Burger King just for the sake of piling on. There’s plenty of that running around. Instead, as I have done with United Airlines and another crisis communications preparedness post, I choose to use this as a learning and teaching moment, not only for Burger King, but for those who are watching this situation, wondering what could have been done instead.

As you will see below, I think Burger King has learned its lesson, but it is going to take some time to overcome the ill will it caused by using the teaser approach that they did.

All PR Is [NOT] Good PR

I’ve seen many express the thought that all PR is good PR.

That is an antiquated thought, my friends. If I had Tweeted that, how long do you think it would take you to move past the feelings you would suddenly have about me? Would that cause you to suddenly contact me to help you with a project? No, you wouldn’t.

All PR is not good PR.

Hey, Let’s Take Out A Full Page Ad!

As the story unfolded yesterday, many were quick to share a screenshot of an ad that Burger King also placed in the New York Times. The headline was the same, followed by the message they left on Twitter.

Again, great initiative. Bad execution.

AdAge reports that:

“A full-page ad running in The New York Times shows the line in large font and follows with several lines that explain the idea behind Burger King H.E.R. (Helping Equalize Restaurants) scholarship, including the low representation of women in chef and head chef roles across the industry. On Twitter, however, the usage of the line was quickly misconstrued. Burger King U.K. tweeted out just the line “Women belong in the kitchen” on Monday morning, and it was only in subsequent tweets that the intended meaning was explained.”

Burger King's Ad in The New York Times

Let’s Just Delete That Tweet

In their article, AdAge and many others across social media reported that:

“Later on March 8, Burger King U.K. deleted the Tweet and explained its reasoning in a separate Twitter post. “We hear you. We got our initial tweet wrong and we’re sorry,” it began in one tweet. A second tweet read: “We decided to delete the original tweet after our apology. It was brought to our attention that there were abusive comments in the thread and we don’t want to leave the space open for that.”

Here are the Tweets that attempted to clean up the mess:

Burger King's Apology Twitter Thread

I understand what they did. The discussion was so divisive, abusive, and inflammatory that they decided it would be better to remove the original culprit…the ill-fated but well-intentioned Tweet.

Lessons Learned From Burger King

We can all learn from this situation. Here are a few lessons:

  • Abandon the clever Tweets that likely make you and others in your firm cringe a little, or that cause you to ask your agency if this is really going to work because it seems to be a little controversial. When those feelings occur, and I have a feeling they were expressed during their strategy meetings, listen to them.
  • If you have to explain your first Tweet with subsequent Tweets in order to make the first Tweet look not-so-bad and less cringe-worthy, then something is wrong.
  • Don’t ever expect anyone to read the follow-up to your social media messages in order to understand your true meaning. The first message is the most visible one and can cause enough disruption that nothing will undo what happened as a result of that first message, even if it is that you are giving away a million dollars. People might not forget, and they might not read past your first message.
  • If you have something wonderful to announce and launch, then make that obvious upfront, or at least don’t use a controversial click-bait comment or headline to get people to stop the scroll and read.
  • If you make a mistake, own up to it. Talk about it, even when it hurts or feels awkward.

How Could Burger King Have Tweeted This Announcement?

What if they had said:

1st Tweet:

It’s International Women’s Day, and we have some very exciting news. You see, we’ve become very aware that we need to provide the skills, knowledge, and encouragement that will help #TheWomenofBK be promoted to head chef positions in our company. (The character counts might not be perfect, but you can figure this out to make it work for you.)

2nd Threaded Tweet:

We can do better. The facts: Only 20% of professional chefs in UK kitchens are women. That’s not right. Our kitchens are open to all who want to learn and become professional chefs.

3rd Threaded Tweet:

We can do better. Starting today, we are going to work hard to change that by awarding culinary scholarships to women on our staff because they are the best of the best at what they do, and they deserve to be promoted.

4th Threaded Tweet:

We can do better. This starts today. Listen to a few messages from the women of BK who are now professional chefs. We are inspired by them and have invited them to help us craft this scholarship program so that we do it right.

5th Through 20th Threaded Tweets:

These Tweets would incorporate messages with photos or brief videos from real women who work at Burger King, including those with aspirations and those who are already executive chefs. Bring this initiative to life by letting us see real faces.

Bottom Line

Again, this isn’t an attack on Burger King. They are embarrassed and have told us they learned their lesson. This was a difficult lesson for them to learn, but they owned up to their mistake and attempted to fix it.

Some will forgive them, some will not.

Some were offended by it, others were not, and even think people overreacted. Don’t minimize the real feelings of those who were offended by your posts just because some are not offended.

When you are ready to plan a promotion like this, watch the controversial, click-baiting, clever headlines, comedy, and edgy headlines you are tempted to use. They can and will be misunderstood.

Your thoughts?

Until next time…

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and virtual presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Lawyers, A Robust LinkedIn Profile Is Not Enough

Lawyers, A Robust LinkedIn Profile Is Not Enough

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Business Development/Sales, LinkedIn Leave a Comment

You can’t expect your LinkedIn profile to do all of the heavy lifting for you.

You might be surprised to read that from me because you know me as an active LinkedIn trainer and coach, but this next point is important.

Networking Is A Contact Sport

When it comes to reaching the right people at the right time with the right message, you need to play an active role.

Networking is a contact sport. You can’t do it alone.

A Robust LinkedIn Profile Is Only The Start

You can (and should) create a robust profile, but don’t expect it to do everything.

Once you have made yourself digitally discoverable and credible by filling out all of the sections LinkedIn gives you, which you might not even know exist because you have to add and populate them for them to be visible, you can’t close your app or browser tab and pretend LinkedIn will take care of bringing in new business for you.

That is similar to putting your bio on your firm’s website and sitting at your desk waiting for the phone to ring or vibrate, or for an email to arrive.

Who Is Important To You?

You need to spend time on LinkedIn interacting with the people you care about, or who are important to the strength of your practice.

I’m not suggesting you spend hours there every day, or even one hour a day, but a few minutes here and there spent on best practices is what will accelerate the relationship-building process.

I Have Good News For You

The good news? Most people are not taking the time to interact in a meaningful way, which means you can stand out by being the one.

Be the one.

Until next time…

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and virtual presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Lawyers, Before You Host A Webinar or Event, Do This First

Lawyers, Here Is A Webinar and Virtual Event Checklist For You To Follow

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Video Marketing, Virtual Presentation Skills Leave a Comment

You’re finally on-board, interested, and maybe even a little excited about hosting a webinar or other online event. Intuitively, and maybe even competitively, you know you need to be “out there.”

You’re ready!

Well, before you take one more step, there’s something you need to do first or your event could be a flop.

Let’s discuss.

Listen, Then Download The Checklist 

Please listen to this brief 5-minute Legal Marketing Minutes podcast episode in the player directly below, but I don’t want you to miss the Successful Virtual Event Strategy checklist I have prepared for you, which you will find mentioned below the player. It includes a fill-in-the-blank version of the checklist that will guide you as you think about the items in the checklist.

Do You Have A Marketing Professional To Help You?

If you are truly lucky, or smart, you have a marketing or business development professional, maybe even 2 or 20, to help you walk this path. Please share this post with them so you are all on the same page.

Maybe you don’t have anyone to help you. Either way, you are still responsible for thinking through this list I am sharing with you.

Click on this image below to request a copy of the checklist referenced in the podcast.

Successful Webinars and Virtual Events for Lawyers

It is necessary to work through these steps in order for your attendees, those people who are your clients, potential clients, referral sources, media, and other influencers to see this event as smooth, professional, and worthy of their valuable time. If you skip them and rush into your event, you risk looking unprepared.

As I mentioned above, the summary checklist of all of these steps in this episode can be found via this link.

Are You Ready?

Are you ready to host a webinar or other event?

Have you downloaded the checklist?

I know your time is valuable, and I don’t take that lightly, so I appreciate you spending a few of your legal marketing minutes right here with me.

Until next time…

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and virtual presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

 

How Soon Should You Contact A Potential Client

Lawyers, How Soon Should You Contact A Potential Client?

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Business Development/Sales, Content Marketing, Training in Client Service and Business Development/Sal Leave a Comment

I have been the recipient of a few practices that I think border on professional stalking, and you probably have, too. The last thing that I want for you is to be perceived as though you are overstepping or professionally stalking your potential clients, so I want you to learn from my experience.

I recently attended a wonderful webinar hosted by my friends David Ackert and John Corey. If you don’t know them, I recommend you get to know them because they’re very smart people.

They were talking about business development, which got me thinking because they were talking about “top of funnel” activities.

Stick with me here. I started my career in sales, or what we might call business development in the legal profession today. My job was completely dependent on listening, research, relationships, customization, and follow-up, so this topic is near and dear to me.

Podcast or Blog Post: Your Choice Below

If you would like to listen to the podcast version of this, you can click the green button below. I also turned it into a blog post for you, which you can find below that. If you are reading this off of my website, just click here to return to the post and podcast.

A Basic Explanation Of The Sales Funnel For You

You may or may not have heard of the sales funnel. Let me shorten it to suggest that you picture a funnel with the top of it being the biggest and the bottom being the smallest, obviously.

Your general marketing activities and content are what bring curious people into the top of your sales funnel. Something you have said, done, or posted has made someone curious enough to consume a little bit of you.

This top part of your funnel can bring a lot of people in, but all of those people will not end up making their way to the bottom of your funnel with others who have decided they are very interested in doing business with you. You haven’t gone through a process of feeding these top of funnel people more targeted information that has to do with their specific issue, and they haven’t gone through the process of self-selecting their way deeper into your funnel to get to know you better.

I kept that description of the sales funnel short for the purposes of this discussion. If you’d like, you and I can go a lot deeper into that conversation another time.

Accelerating A Relationship That Hasn’t Even Started

What I don’t want to see happen to you and your potential clients is what I have seen happen too often, which is that you try to accelerate a relationship that hasn’t even started.

It helps to remember that most of your potential clients choose to go through a bit of research before they decide they want to talk to you or any other lawyer about their matter.

That research can include asking for a referral from someone else. It can also mean going to your website to check you out. It can mean they have gone to your LinkedIn profile to review your qualifications and background. (By the way, if you have not polished your LinkedIn presence, this resource might be helpful to you. It is important for the reasons I am describing today.)

Your Potential Clients Want To Learn

It could be they have downloaded a resource much like this LinkedIn checklist from me, for example. It could also be that they attended a webinar like I did with David Ackert and John Corey. It could be so many things that people are just interested in because they are curious.

They are checking you out and they want some more information. They could be mildly curious, or they could be very curious about a specific topic, but chances are they have not yet progressed to the point where they are thinking “Oh, my gosh, I really need to get to know this lawyer because I’ve just started to research him or her.”

Give Them Room To Breathe

I want you to be careful about contacting them too soon. I want you to give them room to breathe before you move in on them.

What does that mean?

Well, some of you are starting to use tools such as HubSpot and some other tools that do some lead scoring so that you can tell when someone has been on your website. You can tell when they have visited certain pages. You can even put a Facebook or a LinkedIn pixel on your website so that you can see who has visited certain pages, and then you can contact them accordingly with a message that acknowledges that.

Well, the following is what I do not want to see happen with that kind of intelligence.

This Practice Turns People Off

One of the largest sales companies in the world is, in my opinion, one of the most aggressive actors in this respect. Occasionally, I will read a resource of theirs. I will consume a piece of content on this company’s website. Keep in mind that I could be a referral source for this company because I could talk to you about this company. But when I read a lone piece of content every once in a great while, and I mean once a year at the most, that should be a message to them that I am in the research phase when I am reading that content.

On more than one occasion over the years, immediately after I left that page on this company’s website, I received a phone call or an email.

When this immediate follow-up occurs after one piece of content has been consumed, that feels way too pushy because my behavior at the top of their sales funnel should not have been an indication to them that I was ready for contact that is that personal.

I need to move just a bit further into their funnel. I need to have more experience with them before they call or email. I need to build those know, like, and trust factors a little bit more before they engage in a middle or a bottom of the funnel activity, which allows for more intimate contact with me, such as sending me an email or calling me. I am not there yet.

Your Potential Clients Are No Different

Just because they have read something of yours, consumed a piece of content, clicked a reaction on LinkedIn, or any number of subtle gestures, don’t assume people are ready for their phones to ring. Be very careful and take this on a case-by-case basis. Be careful when you are using marketing technology such as HubSpot or other lead scoring tools, or even your own intuition so you don’t misunderstand and assume this potential client is ready to have more personal contact from you.

Those Who Haven’t Entered Your Funnel

Let’s also talk about cold contacts. Those who have not yet entered your world or your funnel are considered cold contacts. These are people you have no contact with; no conversation, and no commenting back and forth via social media or any other medium. They haven’t even consumed any of your content, at least not that you know of.  This person can be considered a cold contact because they might not know who you are yet.

What I don’t want you to do is what I have experienced many times, which is something that really turns me off as a potential purchaser of services. At this stage, you do not want to ask that person for an appointment. It is not a best practice to send this person a private message or an email to say you would like to schedule a time to talk about what you do for a living because you know you can help them.

Don’t Assume You Are The Right Solution

Don’t assume you can help them because you don’t know that yet. You haven’t had enough contact with that person. During the business development process, you need to respect peoples’ boundaries. There will come a time when you have spent more time getting to know that person, interacting with them in different spaces, or by helping them get to know you by creating content that demonstrates your expertise. You will make that content easy to find by sharing it broadly in the spaces you know they occupy. Make you and your knowledge easy for them to find. Offer a registration form near your content so they can choose to move to the next stage of your funnel and get to know you even better.

There Are Always Exceptions

Of course, there are exceptions to all of these situations.

You may have a feeling in your gut when the best time is to contact someone you have connected with along the way. If you aren’t sure, I can be your sounding board to guide you and to give you feedback on those kinds of business development activities.

Bottom Line

Again, be very careful. Don’t rush your contact with your potential clients. Give them some space to research and get to know you. Let them breathe. Let them feel like your relationship is completely natural because they have progressed through your relationship funnel and are ready for you.

Thanks again to David Ackert and John Corey for inspiring this post and this episode of the Legal Marketing Minutes podcast, and for bringing these additional thoughts out of my brain today. I appreciate both of them because they are longtime friends and good people.

Additional episodes of the Legal Marketing Minutes podcast can be found right here. I’d love to have you as a subscriber!

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and video presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Should Lawyers Use Clubhouse?

Are You Tempted By Clubhouse and Other Bright, Shiny Social Media?

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Audio, Podcasting, Social Media Leave a Comment

Clubhouse is the next social media darling. It is social audio that promises to connect you with people and conversations at a much deeper level than you might find elsewhere. It is one of the fastest-growing apps in at least a century…okay, maybe not really a century because there weren’t apps then, right?

At the time of this podcast recording, it is an app that is only available on iOS. Don’t worry if you’re an Android user as I know the Android app is coming soon.

If you are wondering whether you should follow this bright, very shiny new social media platform, join me here for 5 minutes while I give you my opinion and guidance. Let me know what you think. Just click the play button below.

Are you already on Clubhouse?

Will you be?

Do you feel like you’re spreading yourself too thin with too many platforms, or do you have it all under control?

I’d love to hear your thoughts. I will be spending some time there so I can be more informed when I advise my clients.

Until that time, thanks for being here.

Additional episodes of the Legal Marketing Minutes podcast can be found right here. I’d love to have you as a subscriber!

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and video presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Should You Add Video or A Podcast To Your Blog

Should You Add Video Or A Podcast To Your Blog?

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Blogging, Content Marketing, Podcasting, Video Marketing, Videos Leave a Comment

You may be wondering if you should mix things up and swap out some of your blog posts with video, or maybe even a podcast.

Quick Answer: Yes.

This question was posed in a group I’m a part of by someone who said he was thinking about posting video on his firm’s blog now and then.

If you like video, you can watch below. If you prefer reading, feel free to scroll right by the video player to read the blog post.

You Don’t Have To Choose

It’s 2021. You don’t have to choose between them. If we acknowledge that different people have different modes of content consumption, which they do, then why don’t we think about how we can incorporate various forms of media to meet them where they are?

Where Should You Start?

Blog To Video: What does that look like? Well, it can take various shapes. You can write a blog post, then, if you are natural at interpreting that in front of a camera without sounding scripted, then do that. That’s a very challenging thing for some to do, so be careful with this one. You can naturally record the entire blog post on camera, or you can take the five most important points in that blog post and create a conversational video talking about those points. In case you’re curious, people can be coached to become more natural on camera.

Video To Blog Post: Let’s say you are pretty good on camera and you either have someone ask you a question to get started, or you let your viewers know you are going to answer a question that you received. Turn your recording software on, tease the topic, then start talking. Introduce yourself, then get into your answer. Then what you can do is upload that video and have it transcribed. While you’re there, have it captioned, too, because we know for a fact that a large percentage of people are watching video with the sound off, and some are unable to hear your video. Providing captions is a very user-friendly thing to do.

From that transcription, you can turn that into a blog post. You can post it as a transcription the way it came, but you will want to do some cleanup and maybe even reformat it so that it seems more like a blog post.

Video To Podcast: Another approach is to strip the audio from your video and turn that into a podcast. Some people do that but it is not always structured in a podcast format. When you know what you want to say, it doesn’t take that long to re-record your message on audio software and make it sound like a podcast.

Video, Audio, and Blog Post: You can approach this process in any number of ways. It depends on your knowledge, your comfort level, and the resources you have or can find to do all of this. Who’s to say that you don’t end up with a blog post that also has an embedded video player like this one? There are different ways you can host that and embed that in your blog post, including posting it on social media and embedding that social media post there so that they are then also exposed to your social media content.

You could also embed a podcast episode player within that blog post as another method of content consumption.

A Content Buffet

When you offer different formats for your visitors to consume your content, they have a smorgasbord, a buffet, right in front of them, and they can choose the method that works for them at that moment. That may be different at different times for them. Don’t assume that just because someone listens to audio this time, they won’t watch video another time if they are in an environment that’s more conducive to doing so.

Variety Invites Deeper Content Consumption

Don’t assume that just because someone tells you they prefer video or audio that they won’t read as well. I watch the analytics on my blog posts where I have more than one format incorporated into those posts, and the time on site is measurably greater than it is when I publish with the written word alone.

Bottom Line

It’s 2021. We have so many choices in front of us and we can do just about anything we want. It doesn’t have to be one or the other. For your clients, the consumers of your information, your referral sources, media, and anyone else who consumes your content, let’s give them what they want.

Knowing that many people have different ways they like to consume content, why don’t we try to give it to them in the format that they like?

Do What You Can, Then Add On

You don’t have to do all of this at once, or every time. I know you only have so many resources to do this, so start where you can, then add additional formats that give the consumers of your content the format that is most pleasing to them. Watch your analytics to see what is being consumed, if average viewing time increases, if your video and podcast numbers change, and any other changes that are out of the norm.

Don’t give up after trying something different one time. One time isn’t an indication of success or failure. Keep testing and refining…then do that again…and again until you know you are confident you are making the right decision.

As always, let me know if you have any questions. Until next time, thank you so much for spending time with me.

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing ConsultantNancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and video presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

I’m Not Worthy To Put Myself Out There

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Career Development & Education, Motivation Leave a Comment

“I’m not good enough.

“I don’t know enough.”

“There are others who know more than I do about this.”

“What if someone asks a question I can’t answer?”

“I’m not a great writer.”

“I don’t look good on camera.”

“I cringe when I hear my voice.”

Sound Familiar?

Do any of those sound or feel familiar? I want you to know you’re not alone. You don’t have to travel far to find others who suffer from imposter syndrome.

It isn’t a medical condition, but it can make you sick inside, tied up in knots, anxious about putting yourself out there for others to see, hear, and feel.

How Will They Choose You?

Others need to know what you have to offer before they can choose you to help them.

They need to feel confident they are making the right decision when asking for your help.

You need to make their decision easier.

You Should Know

I want you to know:

  • You are good enough.
  • You know enough.
  • There will always be others who know more than you.
  • You will always know more than many others.
  • You will be able to answer the questions.
  • If you aren’t sure, research the data and learn the answers.
  • You don’t have to be a best-selling author to write words that are important to others.
  • Your writing improves with practice.
  • You aren’t the one viewing you on camera. You will always be more critical of yourself than others.
  • You sound much better than you realize, especially when your words are helpful.

Bottom Line

You are more than enough. You can do this. You need to put yourself out there so others can find you.

Give them something that makes their decision easier to choose you over someone else.

Give them you.

Let’s kick imposter syndrome to the curb where it belongs.

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing ConsultantNancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and video presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Lawyers, This Is How To Find More Speaking Opportunities

Lawyers, This Is How To Find More Speaking Opportunities

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Blogging, Content Marketing, Lawyer Marketing, Legal Marketing, Marketing Strategy, Podcasting, Presentation Skills, Social Media, Video Marketing Leave a Comment

The people, companies, and institutions you want to do business with, as well as those who can play a part in helping you accomplish your goals, are your target audiences. They are an important part of the foundation of your marketing and business development plans.

Speaking and presenting to your target audiences is important. It helps you gain exposure to those people, and it helps them get to know you even better. It also helps you build credibility with those audiences because they get to see and hear you while you share your knowledge with them.

That means you need to find ways to speak in front of these people. You need to give presentations and to be invited to the table to do so. Today we’re going to discuss a very important concept that will change the number of speaking opportunities you see coming your way.

If you would like to listen to this in audio form, you can click on the green play button below or click here to listen to the podcast. If you are more of a reader, I have rewritten the podcast as a blog post below.

The following is the podcast rewritten as a blog post for you.

How Do I Find More Speaking Opportunities?

Recently, I saw a question on a legal marketing listserv from a legal marketing professional who said that one of her lawyers wants to speak more, and he wants to get in front of more audiences. She asked for recommendations for him.

Some of our colleagues offered ideas such as:

  • Call your local chamber of commerce. They are always looking for speakers.
  • Contact your bar section. Volunteer to speak in front of other lawyers because they­ could be referral sources.

Several other good suggestions were offered. I observed the conversation for a bit before I offered my advice because it is way too easy for me to offer my two cents, which soon becomes five, and then ten cents. I can’t help it because my brain is wired to serve, and teaching and brainstorming with others are ways I can do that.

It’s Time To Look At This From A Different Perspective

My suggestion was to think about this from a different perspective. First, do all of those things that everyone had already suggested. They are important.

The other thing I recommended she do was to help her lawyer understand that he is in charge of speaking opportunities and that he has control of the number of them that come his way because he can become his own media empire.

How Can You Build A Media Empire?

Media empire wasn’t the exact term I used at the time, but let’s break this down a bit. What does that mean? Well, it means that if you want to get in front of more people than you can take control by strategically using social and digital media to do that.

Don’t wait for somebody to invite you to be a guest on their podcast, or to give a presentation to a nonprofit, a business, or a trade association. If you want to get in front of those people, put yourself in front of those people.

Tell Me The Ways

How do you do that? There are a number of ways you can do that, but first, you should have an idea what you want to talk about. If you and I sat down right now, and I asked you:

  • What are the five things you would love to talk to your target audiences about?
  • What messages do you wish they knew about your practice area?
  • What topics are they concerned about?
  • What developments should they be watching carefully?
  • What challenges are looming?

I have a feeling it would be very easy for you to come up with five or ten ideas about what you would like to say that might be helpful to your audiences. In the process of publicly answering those questions, you would be demonstrating your knowledge. You don’t have to answer all of those ideas in one sitting. Spread them out.

Different Ways To Get In Front Of The Right Audiences

Once you have these five or ten topics, or more if you are on a roll, then those can become the topics to communicate on whatever social or digital media platforms make the most sense for your target audiences.

One way is via a podcast, either yours or someone else’s. You could share your ideas on LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, or Snapchat.

You can write it in a blog post. If you want to dabble in video, you can create short videos on Stories on Facebook, Instagram, and now we have Stories on LinkedIn. If you don’t have them, you’re going to. I’ve been testing them for the past few weeks or so. Stories are simply fifteen or twenty second videos that you place on those platforms. Again, this is very short form content.

Stories go away in 24 hours so you don’t have to worry about them if you’re not really excited about how they turned out. All you have to do is hold your phone or put it in a clamp. There are inexpensive desk clamps that will help provide a steady shot.

With pre-recorded videos, you can secure your phone in a clamp or you can hold it, then press record and talk for a couple minutes about one of these five or ten points that you identified as being important to your clients, your prospects, your referral sources, and any other target audiences you have chosen.

Just upload them right from your phone and add a comment. Preface what you’re uploading and say something simple like: “I want you to know about {Topic A}. There are 2 quick things you need to know about it today.”

Be Consistent If You Want To Make A Lasting Impression

If you do what I have mentioned on a consistent basis, then you are going to get more mileage than if you wait to get invited to speak in front of groups. Don’t abandon that effort because those are important, but know that there are only so many of those opportunities to speak and to give presentations.

If I waited to be accepted to speak in front of my international association at its annual conference as the primary way to help my clients understand what they need to know, I could be waiting years, which is not good for them, or for me. There is a finite number of opportunities, so I need to take control of my message and create my own opportunities.

Give Yourself Permission To Take Control

You also need to take control of this and start sending your own messages and creating your own opportunities. Write down those topics that you would like to talk to people about and then decide whether or not you would like to communicate them via the written word, the spoken word, or via video.

Again, don’t sit back and wait for other people to give you a chance to present. Become your own media producer and decide that you are going to post and control your messages and your presentations to your target audiences.

Again, continue to try to get in front of groups to present to them in more traditional ways, because that is important and is a good idea. Right now, that is a little challenging because communication has become primarily virtual. Meetings and conferences are going through a transition. Don’t give up on those but take control and send your own messages.

Create Your Own Opportunities

  • Look at this from a different perspective.
  • Don’t wait for others to invite you.
  • Become your own media empire.
  • Learn various ways you can send your own message.
  • Be consistent to make a lasting impression.
  • Take control.
  • Build your own media empire.

Okay, it doesn’t actually have to be an empire, but you know what I mean.

Please do me a favor and let me know your thoughts about this topic.

Thank you so much for being here today. I know your time is valuable, so I appreciate you spending a little bit of it right here with me.

Until next time, take care.

Do You Need Coaching In How To Do All Of This?The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP is coming soon!

If you are interested, I would love to have you sign up to be notified when I am ready to launch The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP.

I’m very excited about this as this is my new online training and coaching membership and community for lawyers to work on personal branding, social and digital media, identification of target audiences, planning content for all of those target audiences, and so much more in an effort to establish and nurture relationships and grow your practice, which has never been more important.

We will also work closely on your LinkedIn profile and presence with the goal of finding those with whom you want to do business, being found by those people, and turning your contacts into true connections.

Because I know your schedule is full, there will be bite-sized, easy-to-follow online lessons, live coaching and Q & A sessions, a safe, welcoming community, and gentle nudging and encouragement delivered by me in a non-intimidating, supportive atmosphere.

I am known for making the complex simple and understandable, so I would love to have you join me.

Please message me or visit this link to be notified when I am ready to welcome Founding Members. When I open LMAC VIP, it will only be for about a week or two as I then want to direct my attention to completely serving my Founding Members in the best way possible.

There is no obligation. I will notify you, then you can make the decision from there.

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing ConsultantNancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and video presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.