Lawyers, What Is Holding You Back From Growing Your Practice?

Lawyers, What Is Holding You Back From Growing Your Practice?

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Business Development/Sales, Lawyer Marketing, Motivation Leave a Comment

My husband just had knee replacement surgery on January 16. During the most normal of times, the Ortho docs will warn you that this is one of the toughest surgeries to recover from, more than his 5 meniscus surgeries, the hip replacement he didn’t need (another story for another day), the two rotator cuff surgeries he had, and on and on. Those words of warning are serious, yet there is absolutely no way the reality of the situation can be felt until one is right smack in the middle of all of it.

I said the most normal of times because he had complications…several of them…that resulted in ER visits and a hospital stay. The reason this is significant is that these complications caused him to lose about 10 days of professional physical therapy.

If you’ve been through this surgery, or you know someone else who has, you know that those early days are beyond critical in terms of PT because the body wants to form scar tissue around it to do what it does best, which is to protect itself.

Here’s where you come in.

Fight or Flight?

My close friend, Roy Sexton, just posted on social media that he and the LMA International Board of Directors just finished a 2-day board meeting. Something he said caused me to think of you, and how you and my husband’s knee recovery are very similar.

I know, I know. I’m not a huge fan of using my family’s personal situation to make a point in my business, but Roy’s post made it so obvious to me.

Roy said:

Lawyers, What Is Holding You Back?

 

“In short, we all live to a great extent in the fight or flight side of our brains, and when we are in that survival mode, there is absolutely no way to grow, be strategic, be truly inclusive, or make a long-term difference in this world.”

The concept of flight or fight is not new, but it is timely and important.

My husband’s job, along with the amazing assistance of a professional Physical Therapist, assisted by my not-so-amazing assistance with the same exercises 2 to 3 times a day, is to move past the scar tissue that has now formed around his knee because it tried to protect that brand new, shiny, expensive device the doctor installed.

The challenge now is that scar tissue grew mostly uninterrupted for 10(ish) days while he was battling other hospital-born (we think) issues. Yes, when we weren’t in the hospital, I forced him to do his home exercises with me, but nowhere near what would have been done had he felt better.

Do You Have Those Same Barriers To Progress? 

When you and I think we can’t do something, or won’t do something that we know will help grow our practices, it might be because we have these thoughts:

  • I don’t know how to do it.
  • I don’t want to do it.
  •  I don’t have time to do it.
  • I don’t want to look silly.
  • I don’t want to make mistakes.
  • I don’t know what to say.
  • I don’t know what to post.
  • I don’t like the way I sound.
  • I don’t like the way I look on camera.
  • Someone else has already done this.
  • Someone else has already broken the news.
  • Someone else is smarter than I am.
  • Someone else is younger than I am.
  • Someone else is more experienced than I am.
  • ….and so many more.

Our Own Version of Scar Tissue Develops

When we allow ourselves to think those thoughts, our own version of scar tissue develops in our brains.

Over time, we convince ourselves these things are true, so we put off what we know we should do. We put off doing the amazing things that will help set us apart and make us memorable, which are those things that draw others to us when they need the kind of help you and I provide.

As time goes by, those thoughts become scar tissue that we then have to fight very, very hard to move past because we have allowed them to become what we think to be true. The longer we wait, the more challenging it is going to be. It might even hurt to make progress because that thought, or those thoughts, are in the way and they don’t seem to be going anywhere anytime soon. We’ve allowed them to take up residence in our brains.

Fight or Flight?

We take the path of least resistance, or at least we think it is the path of least resistance because it feels easy to let another minute, hour, day, month, or year go by without doing what we need or want to do to differentiate ourselves.

We take flight in order to avoid the emotions that go along with the thoughts (excuses) I shared above.

It’s Time To Fight

Instead of taking the deceptive path of least resistance and fleeing from the amazing work that I know you can do, I invite you to allow yourself to fight through those barriers, that scar tissue, and to choose to do the things you need to do to grow your practice. There are amazing people around you, and yes, I am one of them, that are here to help you if you don’t know where to start. (That sounded kind of braggy, didn’t it?)

The important thing is to start. Whatever you have to do to make it happen, start.

Is it going to be uncomfortable? Maybe.

Will that discomfort go away? Absolutely.

As I tell my husband when I am pulling his leg back to a position that hurts like heck, this hurts but it is also going to help you get better.

Moving through those thoughts and emotions described above will feel very good down the road. I know it will.

Just like I cheer John on every time he tries to pull his knee back into shape while also feeling intense discomfort, I’ll be here, cheering you on as you fight through your own barriers in your mind, too!

It’s time.

Fight.

Nancy Myrland, Legal Marketing and Business Development Advisor to Lawyers

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers grow their practices by integrating the right marketing practices in order to build their reputations and their relationships, which leads to building their practices.

Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, Nancy is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social, and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter, making them more relevant to their current and potential clients.

She is also a personal branding speaker, trainer, and advisor, helping legal and business professionals understand the importance and the impact of defining and reinforcing their personal brand.

Nancy is also the founder of the hybrid self-study and online course, LinkedIn Course For Lawyers, where she personally guides lawyers through the sequential creation of their LinkedIn profile and presence.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, and livestreaming. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

2023 Legal Marketing Predictions and Recommendations for Lawyers

In 2023, Focus On These Two Things

Nancy Myrland All Posts Leave a Comment

Happy New Year to you!

For the past handful of years, when asked to contribute my predictions and recommendations for the next year, my answer has been the same. One of these years it will change, but not quite yet. The tools and techniques change regularly, but for now, these two predictions and recommendations are still at the top of my list.

In 2023, Do More Of This 

The use of voice and video is very important to add to your marketing and business development plans. I’m not suggesting you abandon the written word because that would be odd given I am using that medium right now, but I am suggesting ways for you to amplify your written word even more.

Relationships Will Accelerate

If you want to accelerate your relationships with those who are important to you and your practice, letting people hear your voice will do that. If you want to ramp up that familiarity even more, let them hear your voice and see your face at the same time.

Don’t be intimidated or overwhelmed by the mention of voice and video. The barriers to entry don’t have to be that high. Sure, use others as inspiration, or as a model, but don’t let comparison stop you from moving forward because you think you aren’t at their skill level. They didn’t start where they are now, so don’t put that kind of pressure on yourself. You’ll get there.

Where Should You Start?

Voice: Podcasting is a powerful way to start. Careful and thoughtful strategy and execution are key, but you don’t have to do that yourself. You do have to be committed, though, so take some time to plan.

Video: So many choices, but short, mobile, or what I call “handheld” messages to your audiences would be a good place to start. The barrier to entry is low. You might just need a little training and coaching, but you can get up to speed quickly.

Ramp Up Voice and Video Even More

You can ramp up your voice and video efforts by creating videos on your computer, livestreaming to LinkedIn and other social and digital media, creating webinars and online tutorials and news, or using AI tools to create and edit what you have produced, but you don’t have to start there to see results.

Start With The Basics

I would like to see you become comfortable starting with the basics I mentioned above. If you aren’t sure you have the time or commitment necessary, the only way you are going to know is if you commit to planning and testing one of these channels and strategies for a few months. You might just find that you do have the time and that it isn’t as huge a beast as it might feel right now.

If you don’t take the time, someone else might.

If you don’t make the time now, when will you?

Your Turn

Let me know how you feel about voice and video. Do you use them? Do you have any questions? If you would rather answer privately, you can find me all over social media by searching for Nancy Myrland. You will find all of that information, and a bit more, right here.

Nancy Myrland, Legal Marketing and Business Development Advisor to Lawyers

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers grow their practices by integrating the right marketing practices in order to build their reputations and their relationships, which leads to building their practices.

Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, Nancy is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social, and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter, making them more relevant to their current and potential clients.

She is also a personal branding speaker, trainer, and advisor, helping legal and business professionals understand the importance and the impact of defining and reinforcing their personal brand.

Nancy is also the founder of the hybrid self-study and online course, LinkedIn Course For Lawyers, where she personally guides lawyers through the sequential creation of their LinkedIn profile and presence.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, and livestreaming. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

Should You Personalize LinkedIn Invitations To Connect?

Should You Personalize LinkedIn Invitations To Connect?

Nancy Myrland All Posts, LinkedIn, Social Media Leave a Comment

The debate goes on whether or not we should personalize invitations to connect on LinkedIn. Short answer? Yes, I think you always should, and here’s why.

Why Do You Want To Connect on LinkedIn?

There are various reasons you might want to connect with someone on LinkedIn. Your reasons are probably different than my reasons, which are different from the next person’s reasons.

The important factor in making this decision is whether you are connecting the dots to that person, and helping them connect the dots to you. If your intended connection can see no reason why they should be connected to you, you have lost an opportunity to form an important relationship, not to mention you have just done what the majority of people on LinkedIn do, which is to send a boilerplate LinkedIn invitation, which I don’t consider very personal. 

I don’t want you to waste your time when you use LinkedIn or any social media. Connecting the dots with another person helps you to make the best use of your time, as well as theirs as they don’t have to try to figure out how they know you, or to view the invitation as purely transactional, which doesn’t create a bond.

What Happens After You Send A Personal Message With Your LinkedIn Invitation?

Speaking of them connecting the dots back to you, that’s what happens when you send a personalized invitation to connect.

In that personal message that you send, you have said something to them that jogs their memory and helps them understand why you want to be connected to them. It doesn’t have to be lengthy. It just needs to be kind and cordial, just like when you’re meeting anyone you would like to get to know better. 

What happens when you send this personal message with your invitation? The majority of invitees will answer you, which gives you one more opportunity to make a connection and probably a positive impression when you answer with a nice statement, such as:

“Looking forward to staying in touch with you. Hope to see you in the newsfeed. Take care.”

Don’t Sell or Promote Anything At This Stage

When you are messaging at this early stage in your LinkedIn relationship, don’t sell. You shouldn’t even get into your practice area, unless, of course, they ask you. 

Don’t worry. You can nurture your relationship with them in other ways. That’s for another video. 

Your Goal Is To Develop An Ongoing Relationship

If you don’t personalize your invitations to connect, what could happen is that you could connect, if they accept your request, and you might never see that person in your newsfeed, or you in theirs. Again, you’ve lost an opportunity to make an impression by connecting with that person on a more personal level. That is not the best use of your time. 

LinkedIn’s algorithms will show us to each other depending on the kind of contact that we have on a regular basis, plus many other factors. I’m not saying interacting in your private inbox on LinkedIn will have an impact on the algorithms. What I am saying is this is one way to make you more memorable before you ever start to interact in the newsfeed. It is a gift as it helps you create an early bond with that other person that you can then begin nurturing. That is what social networking is all about. 

Many won’t do this, so use this opportunity to practice good social skills by virtually walking up to this person and saying something while shaking their virtual hand. If not, this would be similar to meeting someone at an in-person event, handing over your business card, then walking away.

That doesn’t feel very personal or meaningful, does it?

Nancy Myrland, Legal Marketing and Business Development Advisor to Lawyers

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers grow their practices by integrating the right marketing practices in order to build their reputations and their relationships, which leads to building their practices.

Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, Nancy is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social, and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

She is also a personal branding speaker, trainer, and advisor, helping legal and business professionals in firms understand the importance and the impact of defining and reinforcing their personal brand. 

Nancy is also the founder of the hybrid self-study and online course, LinkedIn Course For Lawyers, where she personally guides lawyers through the sequential creation of their LinkedIn profile and presence. 

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, and livestreaming. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

LinkedIn How To Add Clickable Links To Photos

LinkedIn Will Now Let You Add Clickable Links To Photo and Video Posts

Nancy Myrland All Posts, LinkedIn Leave a Comment

LinkedIn is rolling out clickable links in photos and videos in the newsfeed. This will be available on personal profiles as well as on your business page.

This is good exposure for you, so I want you to be ready.

When I first reported on this on my LinkedIn profile last week, I didn’t have this feature. The next day, I had it and was able to test it, which I will show you in a moment.

A Few Details About Clickable Links On LinkedIn

You can now add clickable links to LinkedIn photos & videos on LinkedIn profiles and business pages.

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

You can add a link to an important URL that you would like others to see. Think of articles, downloads, presentations, podcast episodes, blog posts, webinar invitations, organizations you and your firm support, or anything else you think might provide value to your connections, followers, and others who might find your clickable post.

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

The rollout of this feature will allow LinkedIn users to add these photos and videos, along with the clickable link, via mobile. It will be added to the desktop app later this year. You can click on the link via mobile and desktop.

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

I encourage you to think now about the photo and link you would like to test first. Don’t wait for perfection because you will talk yourself out of using this valuable new feature. Test a few different links and media to see what your community appears to be interested in clicking on the most.

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

Remember, you are just like everyone else with this feature. No one starts in the middle. LinkedIn doesn’t even start in the middle. They have to test new features they hope will be successful, too.

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

Examples of Clickable Links In LinkedIn Photos and Videos

To give you inspiration, here are 5 examples from LinkedIn’s announcement.

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

Looks Like Facebook and Instagram Stories

Those of you who are familiar with the Stories format on Facebook and Instagram, and even LinkedIn (RIP, LinkedIn Stories), might think this clickable link post looks a lot like a Story, and you are right. The main difference, and this is significant, is that this link is on media that is in the newsfeed, not hidden in the Stories section. This means exposure could be significant. I will be watching and testing to see how the LinkedIn algorithms feel about external links in the newsfeed.

Instructions To Help You Add A Clickable Link To A LinkedIn Photo

I think you will find the process shown below is quick and intuitive.

Add A Photo: On your home page, click on Add a photo.

How do I add a clickable link in LinkedIn photos

Tap On The Link Icon: Upload your photo from your phone and tap on the link icon at the bottom of the page (sorry, not sorry for the gratuitous selfie with Nick Myrland).

How do I add a clickable link in LinkedIn photos

Add Your URL & Custom Link TextFill in the URL and the link text (description) to help viewers understand what you are inviting them to click on as they need to connect the dots to the time and the risk they are taking clicking on a link that will take them to another site.

Preview Your Link & Click DoneYou will want to take a moment to preview the link so that you can see the URL you have posted is actually opening when clicked on.  After you do that, click Done.

How do I add a clickable link in LinkedIn photos

Add A Comment Explaining What You Are Posting. Don’t forget your hashtags.

How do I add a clickable link in LinkedIn photos

Example of A Clickable Link In A LinkedIn Photo

Thank you for obliging me while I used a picture of my sweet Nickie and me to demonstrate this new feature. After I reported this announcement last week, I found the feature had been added to my LinkedIn account the following day.

You know I had to test it right away. Below you will see a screenshot of the update post I created, which added a clickable link to one of my free resources. In case you are at all interested, if you visit that post here, you can click to receive a copy of my 8 LinkedIn Tips For You checklist.

Let me know what you think.

What link do you think you will share first?

Feel free to tag me when you try this so I can see your great work.

As always, if you need help with LinkedIn strategy, I am always here.

LinkedIn Is Rolling Out Clickable Links In Photos & Videos

 

Nancy Myrland, Legal Marketing and Business Development Advisor to Lawyers

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers grow their practices by integrating the right marketing practices in order to build their reputations and their relationships, which leads to building their practices.

Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, Nancy is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social, and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

She is also a personal branding speaker, trainer, and advisor, helping legal and business professionals in firms understand the importance and the impact of defining and reinforcing their personal brand. 

Nancy is also the founder of the hybrid self-study and online course, LinkedIn Course For Lawyers, where she personally guides lawyers through the sequential creation of their LinkedIn profile and presence. 

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, and livestreaming. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

Can Your Personal Brand Hurt Your Firm's Brand?

Can Your Personal Brand Hurt Your Firm’s Brand?

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Branding, Personal Branding Leave a Comment

Let’s talk about building your brand within your firm, and what you might want to think about in order for that effort to go as smoothly as possible.

Let’s say you are a practicing lawyer within the firm and it’s important to you to be out there and visible and building your brand separate from your firm’s brand.

It could be that you are a business professional, yet you still want to build your brand internally and externally.

Are Your Personal Branding Efforts Consistent With The Firm’s Branding Efforts?

Is building a distinct personal brand hard to do within law firms?

I was a part of a great discussion today on Ari Kaplan’s virtual lunch. If you don’t know Ari, you should. I’ve said that before, and I’ll say it again because I think he is wonderful. Anyhow, we were discussing this today, so I thought I would share with you what I shared with the group.

Your Choice: Blog or Podcast

If you would like to listen to my 2-minute, 50-second episode of Legal Marketing Moments where this blog post originated, you can either click the play button below or click here if you are reading this via email. If you prefer to read this via blog post, I have rewritten and expanded upon the podcast as a blog post below for you.

an Your Personal Brand Hurt Your Firm's Brand?

A Good Place To Start

We need to start this discussion by understanding your firm’s brand.

Here are a few branding questions:

  • What has the firm decided it wants to be known for?
  • What is the personality of the firm?
  • How does it deliver its messages and its services, meaning what lawyers and other professionals do for clients, and how does your firm deliver those?
  • What is the culture that the firm wants everybody to see internally and externally?

This Is Where Your Brand Comes Into Play

Once you understand your firm’s brand, you then need to think about whether your personal branding efforts are consistent with all of those factors that go into the firm’s brand (answer the questions above for your own brand).

For example, let’s say your firm is very conservative. They are measured in what they say and do because that speaks to the type of clients you have. The firm might want to be known for being the voice of reason, not flying off the handle, not being too out there, and being very smart and measured.

Alongside your firm’s conservative, smart, measured brand, you will then want to build your personal brand. It doesn’t have to be identical, but it should be complementary.

Perhaps you are way out there. If your firm’s brand is 10 miles an hour, maybe your style is that you want to go 90 miles an hour. You are really out there, and your personality is much more assertive.

Let’s say:

  • You like to crack jokes all the time, or
  • You like to talk about your personal life a lot, which can be a mess sometimes, or
  • You like to get very political, or
  • You like to be controversial

It’s Time For Serious Thoughts and Discussion

I think it might be time to say, you know what? I am in this place, in this firm, at this time, by my choice, for a reason.

I recommend you have a serious discussion or give some serious thought to the notion that you can hurt your firm’s brand. It’s not that the firm necessarily wants to stop you from having your own personal brand. I think it is much more intellectual than that by determining if all of this works together for your good and the good of the firm.

Consistent and Complementary?

Think about the 2 people, 20 people, or 2000 people at your firm. Is there consistency there, or are there blips on the radar in the form of very different personal brands that are not complementary to your firm’s brand that could damage, alter or confuse people about what your firm’s brand is?

Don’t Abandon Your Personal Branding Efforts

I’m not saying that your personal branding efforts are a no-go, but to give them some serious thought. Every now and then, a firm will appreciate this situation as it helps set the tone for what is to come, what might exist in some innovative teams or groups, or a host of many other factors we can discuss.

There might also come a time when your brands collide and there doesn’t seem to be anything that can be done to make everything work as you and your firm wished it would.

I think the steps above are a good place to start this discussion because you can do damage to your firm’s brand.

Important: You can also bolster it with your personal brand, so this discussion is definitely worth the effort.

Additional Personal Branding Posts That Might Interest You

Personal Branding For Lawyers: What Do You Want To Be Known For?

You Damage More Than Your Own Personal Brand With Bad Online Behavior

Branding vs. Positioning: What Is The Difference and Do You Need Both?

In Business, Personal Branding Is Important

Lawyers & Law Firms, Are You Paying Attention To Your Brand?

Personal Branding In The Age of Social & Digital Media

Can Your Personal Brand Hurt Your Firm’s Brand?(the post you are reading)

 

Nancy Myrland, Legal Marketing and Business Development Advisor to Lawyers

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers grow their practices by integrating the right marketing practices in order to build their reputations and their relationships, which leads to building their practices.

Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, Nancy is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social, and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

Nancy is also a personal branding speaker, trainer, and advisor, helping legal and business professionals in firms understand the importance and the impact of defining and reinforcing their personal brand. 

She is also the founder of the hybrid self-study and live online course, LinkedIn Course For Lawyers, where she personally guides lawyers through the sequential creation of their LinkedIn profile and presence. 

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, and livestreaming. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

Lawyers, How To Grow Your Practice - Stay The Course

Lawyers, How To Grow Your Practice: Find The Course, Then Stay The Course

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Business Development/Sales, Podcasting, Podcasts & Recordings Leave a Comment

If you’re anything like me, there are times when there is something you want to accomplish, and you just want it to happen now. You wish you could close your eyes or snap your fingers and it would just be done.

Wouldn’t that be nice? I know I would love that!

You know this skill, this practice, this process, or this action will probably help you grow your practice. The challenge is that you’re busy, and it takes time. The tendency is to skip a few steps so that you will get there quicker, or to not do it at all.

Your Choice: Blog or Podcast

If you would like to listen to my 2-minute, 30-second episode of Legal Marketing Moments where this blog post originated, you can either click the play button below or click here if you are reading this via email. If you prefer to read this via blog post, I have rewritten the podcast as a blog post below for you.

What Would Help You Build Your Practice?

Let’s say you would like to:

  • Learn how to use LinkedIn
  • Launch a podcast
  • Win a client’s business
  • Become a better networker
  • Become a more confident presenter
  • …or any other skill or project that you know is probably going to be good for your practice

You Know This Will Help, But Getting Started Can Be Difficult

You’ve been telling yourself this needs to be done because it will help establish and build your reputation and your relationships with your clients and potential clients and other influencers, but starting can be the most difficult because you just want it to happen.

  • If you want to launch a podcast, shouldn’t you just be able to sign up and start recording?
  • Shouldn’t you just be able to get on LinkedIn and be found?
  • Aren’t there one or two things you can do to become a stellar presenter?

You might be wondering if there is a quick way to accomplish this marketing or business development practice that will result in helping people notice you as an informed, intelligent leader in your practice area.

Let’s Step Back A Moment

We need to step back a little bit. This is a message I give myself every once in a while because I tend to do things very quickly. When I get something in my mind, I want it to happen right away. I am able to move through tasks and processes very quickly just because that’s my nature. I’m sure it doesn’t hurt that I’ve owned my own business for 20 years now, which makes it very easy to decide what comes next.

My recommendation to you comes from many years of fighting myself on this and finally getting to the point where I know that I need to give myself the grace and have the patience to go through the steps that I need to go through to be effective at whatever it is I am trying to do.

I Want The Same For You

I want whatever it is you are trying to do to stick and to be sustainable so that it results in helping you accomplish your goals of client and practice development.

Here are 3 suggestions for you:

  1. Don’t take shortcuts unless you have someone skilled in the subject teach you their time-tested and ethical shortcuts.
  2. Learn sequentially. There is typically a reason lessons and processes are in the order they are, which is typically because the next step builds upon the last. Try to not be impatient and skip to the last lesson in a plan, project, tutorial, or online course because it seems that will help you get to the finish line quicker.
  3. Give yourself the grace and the patience to go through the steps needed to successfully build, launch, announce, develop, or teach whatever it is you would like to do.

I Have A Resource For You

If effective use of LinkedIn is one of those tasks or goals you have, I want to make sure you have my free resource:

LinkedIn For Lawyers: 8 Essential Ways To Get Noticed By The Right People On LinkedIn.

This complimentary resource contains 8 best practices for using LinkedIn effectively. Don’t worry, you don’t have to use them all. Just use the ones that are comfortable for you, then test the others when you’re ready.

It also contains a monthly check-off calendar that can serve as a reminder to use these best practices. Having this visual aid will help to remind you to use these best practices, thereby creating very good habits on LinkedIn.

You can get that by clicking on this link or by clicking on the graphic below.

LinkedIn For Lawyers - 8 Essential Tips and Best Practices by Nancy Myrland

Thanks so much for being here!

Take care.

Nancy Myrland, Legal Marketing and Business Development Advisor to Lawyers

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers grow their practices by integrating the right marketing practices in order to build their reputations and their relationships, which leads to building their practices.

Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, Nancy is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social, and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

She is also the founder of the hybrid self-study and online course, LinkedIn Course For Lawyers, where she personally guides lawyers through the sequential creation of their LinkedIn profile and presence. 

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, and livestreaming. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

Personal Branding For Lawyers With Nancy Myrland

Personal Branding For Lawyers: What Do You Want To Be Known For?

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Branding, Personal Branding Leave a Comment

If one of your goals is to become well-known so that your name automatically rises to the top when others have a need for someone who does what you do, there are a few things you can do to make that happen. Allow me to help.

Don’t They Know What You Do?

It would be nice if your phone just rang, or you received emails, texts, or private messages every time someone needed your help.

You might think:

“Don’t they know what I do? I’ve been around for a while. Shouldn’t they know by now what I do?”

Well, that would be nice, but I think you and I need to take a little more responsibility to help this along. The good news is that it is not that difficult.

Your Choice Below: Blog or Video

If you would like to watch the 3-minute, 52-second video where this blog post originated (faster if you speed me up in the controls), you can either click the play button below, or click here if you are reading this via email and don’t see the player. If you prefer to read this via blog post, I have written that for you below.

How Do You Become Well-Known?

In essence, what we’re talking about, and this is an important business development discussion, is about building your brand, or personal branding.

Even though there is a more formal process you can go through to define what your personal brand is, or what you would like it to be, I want you to think about it in very simple terms.

This Is How To Start

The first thing I would like you to do is to give some thought to what it is you want to be known for.

What is the topic, or what are the very few topics that you want to be known for so that, when someone is having a discussion about that topic or your practice area, your name will come up as one of the first and one of the most knowledgeable?

Put A Stake In The Ground

That doesn’t mean you have to forgo talking about all of the other wonderful things that you do, or other services that you provide that can help your clients.

It just means that you need to put a stake in the ground and let people know, without a doubt, that this is a topic and this is a practice area that you care about and that you know about.

Here Is An Example For You

For example, I am known for effective LinkedIn training for business development purposes.

Does that mean that I don’t talk about:

  • Personal branding
  • Podcast creation and consulting
  • Zoom and virtual presentation coaching
  • Helping lawyers create their business development plans

No, it doesn’t. I pepper those things in as well. I can’t help it. That’s my background. It’s broad and it’s varied because I believe in and I teach integrated marketing, but it’s all about business development and helping you grow your practice. That is my mission.

What is important for this example is that I am known for my LinkedIn training, consulting, and coaching with a business development focus. My other consulting services grow because my clients learn about them, or because of that content I mentioned sharing now and then.

The same can happen for you.

My Recommendations For You

To begin, you need to decide:

  1. What is that one thing you want to be known for?
  2. What is it that makes you a household name among your clients, potential clients, referral sources, and other influencers?
  3. I want you to then go about creating a process that will help others understand that you are somebody who should be considered when they have a need in your practice area.

After you answer those questions, that process mentioned above means that you need to communicate that one thing on a regular basis to those you care about doing business with, or who can influence the growth of your practice.

We are living in a time that offers so many ways to communicate what you know and what you do to other people. You no longer have to wait for someone to communicate that for you.

Put Your Stake In The Ground

Put your stake in the ground. What is it that one thing you want to be known for? Let me know via comment, email, or private message.

Additional Personal Branding Posts That Might Interest You

Personal Branding For Lawyers: What Do You Want To Be Known For?

You Damage More Than Your Own Personal Brand With Bad Online Behavior

Branding vs. Positioning: What Is The Difference and Do You Need Both?

In Business, Personal Branding Is Important

Lawyers & Law Firms, Are You Paying Attention To Your Brand?

Personal Branding In The Age of Social & Digital Media

Can Your Personal Brand Hurt Your Firm’s Brand?

Nancy Myrland, Legal Marketing and Business Development Advisor to Lawyers

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers grow their practices by integrating the right marketing practices in order to build their reputations and their relationships, which leads to building their practices.

Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, Nancy is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social, and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

She is also a personal branding speaker, trainer, and advisor, helping legal and business professionals in firms understand the importance and the impact of defining and reinforcing their personal brand. 

Nancy is also the founder of the hybrid self-study and online course, LinkedIn Course For Lawyers, where she personally guides lawyers through the sequential creation of their LinkedIn profile and presence. 

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, and livestreaming. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

Lawyers & LinkedIn: 4 Easy Ways To Repurpose Your Content

Lawyers & LinkedIn: 4 EASY Ways For You To Repurpose Existing Content

Nancy Myrland All Posts, LinkedIn, Social Media Leave a Comment

One of the most effective ways to let your clients and potential clients know you are knowledgeable in the topics they care the most about is to share content that demonstrates your knowledge.

It takes time to create and share content. You’re busy. How are you supposed to find time to do all of this?

In my latest 2-minute, 41-second episode of Legal Marketing Moments (my 2-3 minute podcast), I share 4 quick and easy ways for you to repurpose existing content that will help you build your reputation and your relationships on LinkedIn.

If you are seeing this via email or another content curation platform that doesn’t show the episode player below, please click on this link to be taken right to this episode.

NOTE:

After you listen, let me know which one of the four is your favorite!

Thanks!

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to build their reputations and their relationships, which leads to building their practices.

Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, Nancy is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social, and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, and livestreaming. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

 

 

Lawyers, The Competition That Kills You Might Not Look Like You

Lawyers, The Competition That Kills You Might Not Look Like You

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Business Development/Sales, Business of Law, Client Service and Retention, Competition Leave a Comment

At the recent Legal Marketing Association conference (#LMA22) in Las Vegas, our keynote presenters on the first day were Richard and Daniel Susskind, the visionaries we have all come to know, like, trust, and respect in this industry and profession.

Richard and Daniel study and look at the future of the profession and give recommendations and insight as to how firms can protect, nurture, and grow their businesses.

During the conversation, Richard shared a reminder that the competition that kills you might not look like you.


That got a lot of people in the audience thinking because, in the legal profession, many tend to look at the law firm down the street, or across the country, or across the world as their primary competition. These are the obvious choices because they have been for a very long time. We can see them.

The Not So Obvious Sources of Competition For Lawyers

Today and in the future, you must realize that your competition does not just come from traditionally structured law firms, but from those you might not even be imagining.

What would happen if groups of lawyers from different firms went out on their own and created completely different business models that allow them to serve your clients just as well, if not better than you do?

It’s easy to say that this won’t happen, or that others have tried it and failed. You are safe because your business is healthy.

It is easy to put those blinders on, but let’s look at what has happened in other industries.

  • Look at taxis that have been eaten alive by Uber and Lyft.
  • Look at traditional bookstores that have been replaced by online digital sources of information.
  • Look at the retail industry that has been decimated by efficient and not always less expensive digital powerhouses such as Amazon.
  • Look at CPAs who have lost a bit of business to those who use TurboTax at home.

The Pandemic Has Changed Everything

Richard told us that more people signed up for Harvard’s online services in one year during the pandemic than had enrolled in Harvard’s history. Harvard offered, and students found, a solution that was likely never imagined by Harvard 10 years ago.

Just as with institutions like Harvard, the pandemic forced you and your clients to embrace technology in order to continue to communicate and conduct business. This trend will not reverse. It is nearly impossible to forget or unlearn those skills and ways of doing business that you and your clients have learned.

Alternative Service Providers (ALSPs) Will Figure Out How To Give Your Clients What They Want and Need

The point is that there are people out there thinking about better ways to do what you do.  You can’t get complacent, thinking that won’t happen.

A wise course of action is to figure out what your clients want, need, and expect, even if it isn’t obvious to them.

Richard reminded us that your clients don’t want lawyers, they want the results you offer.

Do The Results You Offer Match What Your Clients Need?

Knowing that your clients want results, it would be wise to regularly ask yourself what results you are offering your clients.

What results are they looking for?

What emotions, problems, anxiety, fears, and other challenges lie beneath the challenges they are able to articulate?

I Was Asked What Firms Can Do To Prepare For This New Competition

Last week, I was invited to network by a fairly new legal marketing and business development professional. This professional has been in our industry for two years, so she wanted to connect and ask my opinion on a few legal business issues.

During our conversation, she referred to Richard and Daniel Susskind’s keynote, and asked me what I thought some of the things are that law firms can do to prepare for, and set themselves apart from, that competition that Richard said might not look anything like us.

I offered my thoughts on a few different solutions. Of course, I mentioned technology and personalization and the ability of those tools to reach clients, potential clients, and other influencers in a way that nurtures and solidifies relationships.

I also agreed with the Susskinds that we need to continue to step up our knowledge and strategic use of technology to build reputations, relationships, and the more efficient execution of the tasks that we must do to run our firms and practices.

Technology Is Great, But Let’s Back Up A Bit

As critical as legal technology is to just about every function in your firm, it is equally important to take a step back and look at some very basic principles because, without them, the latest and greatest technology will not be as effective as it can and should be.

The Question Lawyers Must Ask Themselves

When competition surfaces, what is it that consumers of products and services use to determine who they will do business with?

What are the measuring sticks used to help make their decisions easier? Are those measuring sticks tangible, or are they more subjective?

In other service-based businesses, if a new business or firm pops up down the street, or strategically places an ad in front of a buyer on the Internet, what would cause that buyer to not jump ship and leave their favorite provider to try out that new service?

Put Yourself In Your Clients’ Shoes

You need to put yourself in the same decision-making position as your clients and potential clients.

Ask yourself, or ask them, what are those things that would cause these people who are so valuable to you and the future of your practice and your firm to be so secure, confident, and pleased with your working relationship that, when faced with alternate sources for service that you offer, they would easily make the decision to continue working with you?

What is it that you do, or could start doing, on a regular basis that helps them realize that:

  • You are easy to do business with
  • You provide service in a way that no one else can
  • You understand their business better than anyone else
  • You go the extra mile to make sure they are prepared for any new developments in their industry
  • You truly value their business and your relationship

Make Yourself Unbeatable

Spend some time brainstorming the answers to the questions above. Please don’t wait until the next pandemic or recession starts to try to make yourself indispensable and unbeatable. This is not a short-term task that you can accomplish at a moment’s notice, but one that is worth your time, effort, and resources to work on now.

  • Gather your team.
  • Brainstorm.
  • Ask your clients.
  • Observe what your clients react to.

Practice Account-Based Marketing (ABM)

Form an effort around each client and prospect. Create a plan that speaks directly to making each one happy. Think about all of your clients’ and prospects’ team members, taking into consideration their skills and knowledge and how you can also help them succeed so they are prepared for their current and future responsibilities, and so that you nurture relationships you might rely upon one of these days when your primary contact leaves.

Remember, Your Competition Might Not Look Like You

As Richard Susskind shared, your competition might not look anything like you.

Even more important, your competition might not act anything like you, either, and that could very well be your advantage, now and in the future.

NOTE: If you would like to see the rest of the notes I took during Richard and Daniel Susskind’s wonderful keynote, you can find those right here.

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to build their reputations and their relationships, which leads to building their practices.

Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, Nancy is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. 

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, and livestreaming. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

Law Firms, Are You Still Discouraging The Use of Social Media?

Law Firms, Are You Still Discouraging The Use of Social Media?

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Social Media, Social Media Ethics & Regulations Leave a Comment

I read an article last Friday on Law.com about law firms that put restrictions on the use of social media by their legal and business professionals. You might find it hard to believe this is still an issue, but it stems from some firms being worried about what’s going to happen on social media. They don’t fully trust their people to make good decisions, so they don’t let them use social media, or they ask to review everything they post.Law Firms Discourage The Use of Social MediaIn today’s blog post and episode of Legal Marketing Moments (my 2-3 minute podcast), let’s talk about that because, in this day and age, these restrictions concern me.

If you prefer to listen to this as a podcast episode, you can click on the image below. If you are reading this via email and don’t see the player, I invite you to visit this link.

Legal Marketing Moments podcast with Nancy Myrland

Are You Still Restricting The Use of Social Media In Your Law Firm?

If you are still in the mode of not letting people in your law firm use social media, or if you are putting a tight rein over them, asking to review what they are going to post, you might want to take a few steps back to think about the implications of those restrictions, as well as the benefits of lifting them.

Social Media Can Strengthen Brands and Careers

Social media are such good tools. In the right hands with the right intentions, they can:

  • Build and strengthen your firm’s brand
  • Build relationships
  • Build and extend reputations
  • Build practices

Building relationships with the people that you and everybody in your firm care the most about doing business with or learning from enable everyone in your firm to build their reputations on an individual level, which contributes to the overall brand of your firm. This also has a huge impact on your professionals’ longevity and their career.

Those who build their reputation and their relationships are those who are remembered first by others. They make it easy for others to remember them when the time comes and their services are needed.

Is It A Training Issue?

Perhaps this is rooted in a lack of training. If so, then please invest in training. Don’t just train once, but make sure there are reminders throughout the year. Requiring everyone to attend a training on LinkedIn, or any social media, then not reinforcing or demonstrating what that looks like on a regular basis, will probably not result in meaningful change.

Perhaps you should consider building an online learning platform that provides ongoing training sessions.

I’m happy to discuss a customized version of my LinkedIn Course For Lawyers for your firm specifically.

I am also happy to have you and your lawyers attend my next cohort of my LinkedIn Course for Lawyers virtual course, but please make sure to renew on a regular basis to remind yourselves of changes and best practices for the most effective and efficient use.

Social Media Users, This Next Message Is For You

If you find yourself saying silly or divisive things on social media, things you would not do face to face with your clients and potential clients, or in conversation with media, then you need to pull back a little bit. You’re intelligent, so please use your intelligence and common sense in these public spaces.

Build Your Personal and Your Firm Brand

Build a personal brand you can be proud of, and that you can build your career on. This also contributes to the overall brand of your firm, which is made up of all of the pieces of personal brands that you and your colleagues are demonstrating on a daily basis.

Bottom Line

Please don’t hold your people back from using social media because you’re worried they are going to ruin or break something. Let’s train your legal and business professionals so they can be an army of marketers and brand builders that are helping to build their reputation, and that of your firm.

Questions?

If you have any questions or comments, just let me know. Feel free to contact me at [email protected] or any of these places

SPECIAL NOTE: 

As mentioned above, if you would like to be notified when my hybrid live (virtual) and self-study course LinkedIn Course For Lawyers is accepting new students again (very soon), you can do that here.

 

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to build their reputations and their relationships, which leads to building their practices.

Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, Nancy is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. 

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcastingvideo marketing, voice marketing, and livestreaming. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.