Lawyers, A Robust LinkedIn Profile Is Not Enough

Lawyers, A Robust LinkedIn Profile Is Not Enough

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Business Development/Sales, LinkedIn Leave a Comment

You can’t expect your LinkedIn profile to do all of the heavy lifting for you.

You might be surprised to read that from me because you know me as an active LinkedIn trainer and coach, but this next point is important.

Networking Is A Contact Sport

When it comes to reaching the right people at the right time with the right message, you need to play an active role.

Networking is a contact sport. You can’t do it alone.

A Robust LinkedIn Profile Is Only The Start

You can (and should) create a robust profile, but don’t expect it to do everything.

Once you have made yourself digitally discoverable and credible by filling out all of the sections LinkedIn gives you, which you might not even know exist because you have to add and populate them for them to be visible, you can’t close your app or browser tab and pretend LinkedIn will take care of bringing in new business for you.

That is similar to putting your bio on your firm’s website and sitting at your desk waiting for the phone to ring or vibrate, or for an email to arrive.

Who Is Important To You?

You need to spend time on LinkedIn interacting with the people you care about, or who are important to the strength of your practice.

I’m not suggesting you spend hours there every day, or even one hour a day, but a few minutes here and there spent on best practices is what will accelerate the relationship-building process.

I Have Good News For You

The good news? Most people are not taking the time to interact in a meaningful way, which means you can stand out by being the one.

Be the one.

Until next time…

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and virtual presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Lawyers, Before You Host A Webinar or Event, Do This First

Lawyers, Here Is A Webinar and Virtual Event Checklist For You To Follow

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Video Marketing, Virtual Presentation Skills Leave a Comment

You’re finally on-board, interested, and maybe even a little excited about hosting a webinar or other online event. Intuitively, and maybe even competitively, you know you need to be “out there.”

You’re ready!

Well, before you take one more step, there’s something you need to do first or your event could be a flop.

Let’s discuss.

Listen, Then Download The Checklist 

Please listen to this brief 5-minute Legal Marketing Minutes podcast episode in the player directly below, but I don’t want you to miss the Successful Virtual Event Strategy checklist I have prepared for you, which you will find mentioned below the player. It includes a fill-in-the-blank version of the checklist that will guide you as you think about the items in the checklist.

Do You Have A Marketing Professional To Help You?

If you are truly lucky, or smart, you have a marketing or business development professional, maybe even 2 or 20, to help you walk this path. Please share this post with them so you are all on the same page.

Maybe you don’t have anyone to help you. Either way, you are still responsible for thinking through this list I am sharing with you.

Click on this image below to request a copy of the checklist referenced in the podcast.

Successful Webinars and Virtual Events for Lawyers

It is necessary to work through these steps in order for your attendees, those people who are your clients, potential clients, referral sources, media, and other influencers to see this event as smooth, professional, and worthy of their valuable time. If you skip them and rush into your event, you risk looking unprepared.

As I mentioned above, the summary checklist of all of these steps in this episode can be found via this link.

Are You Ready?

Are you ready to host a webinar or other event?

Have you downloaded the checklist?

I know your time is valuable, and I don’t take that lightly, so I appreciate you spending a few of your legal marketing minutes right here with me.

Until next time…

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Advisor, specializing in Content, Social & Digital Media. She helps lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and virtual presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

 

How Soon Should You Contact A Potential Client

Lawyers, How Soon Should You Contact A Potential Client?

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Business Development/Sales, Content Marketing, Training in Client Service and Business Development/Sal Leave a Comment

I have been the recipient of a few practices that I think border on professional stalking, and you probably have, too. The last thing that I want for you is to be perceived as though you are overstepping or professionally stalking your potential clients, so I want you to learn from my experience.

I recently attended a wonderful webinar hosted by my friends David Ackert and John Corey. If you don’t know them, I recommend you get to know them because they’re very smart people.

They were talking about business development, which got me thinking because they were talking about “top of funnel” activities.

Stick with me here. I started my career in sales, or what we might call business development in the legal profession today. My job was completely dependent on listening, research, relationships, customization, and follow-up, so this topic is near and dear to me.

Podcast or Blog Post: Your Choice Below

If you would like to listen to the podcast version of this, you can click the green button below. I also turned it into a blog post for you, which you can find below that. If you are reading this off of my website, just click here to return to the post and podcast.

A Basic Explanation Of The Sales Funnel For You

You may or may not have heard of the sales funnel. Let me shorten it to suggest that you picture a funnel with the top of it being the biggest and the bottom being the smallest, obviously.

Your general marketing activities and content are what bring curious people into the top of your sales funnel. Something you have said, done, or posted has made someone curious enough to consume a little bit of you.

This top part of your funnel can bring a lot of people in, but all of those people will not end up making their way to the bottom of your funnel with others who have decided they are very interested in doing business with you. You haven’t gone through a process of feeding these top of funnel people more targeted information that has to do with their specific issue, and they haven’t gone through the process of self-selecting their way deeper into your funnel to get to know you better.

I kept that description of the sales funnel short for the purposes of this discussion. If you’d like, you and I can go a lot deeper into that conversation another time.

Accelerating A Relationship That Hasn’t Even Started

What I don’t want to see happen to you and your potential clients is what I have seen happen too often, which is that you try to accelerate a relationship that hasn’t even started.

It helps to remember that most of your potential clients choose to go through a bit of research before they decide they want to talk to you or any other lawyer about their matter.

That research can include asking for a referral from someone else. It can also mean going to your website to check you out. It can mean they have gone to your LinkedIn profile to review your qualifications and background. (By the way, if you have not polished your LinkedIn presence, this resource might be helpful to you. It is important for the reasons I am describing today.)

Your Potential Clients Want To Learn

It could be they have downloaded a resource much like this LinkedIn checklist from me, for example. It could also be that they attended a webinar like I did with David Ackert and John Corey. It could be so many things that people are just interested in because they are curious.

They are checking you out and they want some more information. They could be mildly curious, or they could be very curious about a specific topic, but chances are they have not yet progressed to the point where they are thinking “Oh, my gosh, I really need to get to know this lawyer because I’ve just started to research him or her.”

Give Them Room To Breathe

I want you to be careful about contacting them too soon. I want you to give them room to breathe before you move in on them.

What does that mean?

Well, some of you are starting to use tools such as HubSpot and some other tools that do some lead scoring so that you can tell when someone has been on your website. You can tell when they have visited certain pages. You can even put a Facebook or a LinkedIn pixel on your website so that you can see who has visited certain pages, and then you can contact them accordingly with a message that acknowledges that.

Well, the following is what I do not want to see happen with that kind of intelligence.

This Practice Turns People Off

One of the largest sales companies in the world is, in my opinion, one of the most aggressive actors in this respect. Occasionally, I will read a resource of theirs. I will consume a piece of content on this company’s website. Keep in mind that I could be a referral source for this company because I could talk to you about this company. But when I read a lone piece of content every once in a great while, and I mean once a year at the most, that should be a message to them that I am in the research phase when I am reading that content.

On more than one occasion over the years, immediately after I left that page on this company’s website, I received a phone call or an email.

When this immediate follow-up occurs after one piece of content has been consumed, that feels way too pushy because my behavior at the top of their sales funnel should not have been an indication to them that I was ready for contact that is that personal.

I need to move just a bit further into their funnel. I need to have more experience with them before they call or email. I need to build those know, like, and trust factors a little bit more before they engage in a middle or a bottom of the funnel activity, which allows for more intimate contact with me, such as sending me an email or calling me. I am not there yet.

Your Potential Clients Are No Different

Just because they have read something of yours, consumed a piece of content, clicked a reaction on LinkedIn, or any number of subtle gestures, don’t assume people are ready for their phones to ring. Be very careful and take this on a case-by-case basis. Be careful when you are using marketing technology such as HubSpot or other lead scoring tools, or even your own intuition so you don’t misunderstand and assume this potential client is ready to have more personal contact from you.

Those Who Haven’t Entered Your Funnel

Let’s also talk about cold contacts. Those who have not yet entered your world or your funnel are considered cold contacts. These are people you have no contact with; no conversation, and no commenting back and forth via social media or any other medium. They haven’t even consumed any of your content, at least not that you know of.  This person can be considered a cold contact because they might not know who you are yet.

What I don’t want you to do is what I have experienced many times, which is something that really turns me off as a potential purchaser of services. At this stage, you do not want to ask that person for an appointment. It is not a best practice to send this person a private message or an email to say you would like to schedule a time to talk about what you do for a living because you know you can help them.

Don’t Assume You Are The Right Solution

Don’t assume you can help them because you don’t know that yet. You haven’t had enough contact with that person. During the business development process, you need to respect peoples’ boundaries. There will come a time when you have spent more time getting to know that person, interacting with them in different spaces, or by helping them get to know you by creating content that demonstrates your expertise. You will make that content easy to find by sharing it broadly in the spaces you know they occupy. Make you and your knowledge easy for them to find. Offer a registration form near your content so they can choose to move to the next stage of your funnel and get to know you even better.

There Are Always Exceptions

Of course, there are exceptions to all of these situations.

You may have a feeling in your gut when the best time is to contact someone you have connected with along the way. If you aren’t sure, I can be your sounding board to guide you and to give you feedback on those kinds of business development activities.

Bottom Line

Again, be very careful. Don’t rush your contact with your potential clients. Give them some space to research and get to know you. Let them breathe. Let them feel like your relationship is completely natural because they have progressed through your relationship funnel and are ready for you.

Thanks again to David Ackert and John Corey for inspiring this post and this episode of the Legal Marketing Minutes podcast, and for bringing these additional thoughts out of my brain today. I appreciate both of them because they are longtime friends and good people.

Additional episodes of the Legal Marketing Minutes podcast can be found right here. I’d love to have you as a subscriber!

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching to be the best they can be when presenting online.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and video presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead select law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Should Lawyers Use Clubhouse?

Are You Tempted By Clubhouse and Other Bright, Shiny Social Media?

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Audio, Podcasting, Social Media Leave a Comment

Clubhouse is the next social media darling. It is social audio that promises to connect you with people and conversations at a much deeper level than you might find elsewhere. It is one of the fastest-growing apps in at least a century…okay, maybe not really a century because there weren’t apps then, right?

At the time of this podcast recording, it is an app that is only available on iOS. Don’t worry if you’re an Android user as I know the Android app is coming soon.

If you are wondering whether you should follow this bright, very shiny new social media platform, join me here for 5 minutes while I give you my opinion and guidance. Let me know what you think. Just click the play button below.

Are you already on Clubhouse?

Will you be?

Do you feel like you’re spreading yourself too thin with too many platforms, or do you have it all under control?

I’d love to hear your thoughts. I will be spending some time there so I can be more informed when I advise my clients.

Until that time, thanks for being here.

Additional episodes of the Legal Marketing Minutes podcast can be found right here. I’d love to have you as a subscriber!

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing Consultant

Nancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and video presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Should You Add Video or A Podcast To Your Blog

Should You Add Video Or A Podcast To Your Blog?

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Blogging, Content Marketing, Podcasting, Video Marketing, Videos Leave a Comment

You may be wondering if you should mix things up and swap out some of your blog posts with video, or maybe even a podcast.

Quick Answer: Yes.

This question was posed in a group I’m a part of by someone who said he was thinking about posting video on his firm’s blog now and then.

If you like video, you can watch below. If you prefer reading, feel free to scroll right by the video player to read the blog post.

You Don’t Have To Choose

It’s 2021. You don’t have to choose between them. If we acknowledge that different people have different modes of content consumption, which they do, then why don’t we think about how we can incorporate various forms of media to meet them where they are?

Where Should You Start?

Blog To Video: What does that look like? Well, it can take various shapes. You can write a blog post, then, if you are natural at interpreting that in front of a camera without sounding scripted, then do that. That’s a very challenging thing for some to do, so be careful with this one. You can naturally record the entire blog post on camera, or you can take the five most important points in that blog post and create a conversational video talking about those points. In case you’re curious, people can be coached to become more natural on camera.

Video To Blog Post: Let’s say you are pretty good on camera and you either have someone ask you a question to get started, or you let your viewers know you are going to answer a question that you received. Turn your recording software on, tease the topic, then start talking. Introduce yourself, then get into your answer. Then what you can do is upload that video and have it transcribed. While you’re there, have it captioned, too, because we know for a fact that a large percentage of people are watching video with the sound off, and some are unable to hear your video. Providing captions is a very user-friendly thing to do.

From that transcription, you can turn that into a blog post. You can post it as a transcription the way it came, but you will want to do some cleanup and maybe even reformat it so that it seems more like a blog post.

Video To Podcast: Another approach is to strip the audio from your video and turn that into a podcast. Some people do that but it is not always structured in a podcast format. When you know what you want to say, it doesn’t take that long to re-record your message on audio software and make it sound like a podcast.

Video, Audio, and Blog Post: You can approach this process in any number of ways. It depends on your knowledge, your comfort level, and the resources you have or can find to do all of this. Who’s to say that you don’t end up with a blog post that also has an embedded video player like this one? There are different ways you can host that and embed that in your blog post, including posting it on social media and embedding that social media post there so that they are then also exposed to your social media content.

You could also embed a podcast episode player within that blog post as another method of content consumption.

A Content Buffet

When you offer different formats for your visitors to consume your content, they have a smorgasbord, a buffet, right in front of them, and they can choose the method that works for them at that moment. That may be different at different times for them. Don’t assume that just because someone listens to audio this time, they won’t watch video another time if they are in an environment that’s more conducive to doing so.

Variety Invites Deeper Content Consumption

Don’t assume that just because someone tells you they prefer video or audio that they won’t read as well. I watch the analytics on my blog posts where I have more than one format incorporated into those posts, and the time on site is measurably greater than it is when I publish with the written word alone.

Bottom Line

It’s 2021. We have so many choices in front of us and we can do just about anything we want. It doesn’t have to be one or the other. For your clients, the consumers of your information, your referral sources, media, and anyone else who consumes your content, let’s give them what they want.

Knowing that many people have different ways they like to consume content, why don’t we try to give it to them in the format that they like?

Do What You Can, Then Add On

You don’t have to do all of this at once, or every time. I know you only have so many resources to do this, so start where you can, then add additional formats that give the consumers of your content the format that is most pleasing to them. Watch your analytics to see what is being consumed, if average viewing time increases, if your video and podcast numbers change, and any other changes that are out of the norm.

Don’t give up after trying something different one time. One time isn’t an indication of success or failure. Keep testing and refining…then do that again…and again until you know you are confident you are making the right decision.

As always, let me know if you have any questions. Until next time, thank you so much for spending time with me.

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing ConsultantNancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients. Nancy also works with many firms and lawyers on Zoom and virtual presentation training and coaching.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and video presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

I’m Not Worthy To Put Myself Out There

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Career Development & Education, Motivation Leave a Comment

“I’m not good enough.

“I don’t know enough.”

“There are others who know more than I do about this.”

“What if someone asks a question I can’t answer?”

“I’m not a great writer.”

“I don’t look good on camera.”

“I cringe when I hear my voice.”

Sound Familiar?

Do any of those sound or feel familiar? I want you to know you’re not alone. You don’t have to travel far to find others who suffer from imposter syndrome.

It isn’t a medical condition, but it can make you sick inside, tied up in knots, anxious about putting yourself out there for others to see, hear, and feel.

How Will They Choose You?

Others need to know what you have to offer before they can choose you to help them.

They need to feel confident they are making the right decision when asking for your help.

You need to make their decision easier.

You Should Know

I want you to know:

  • You are good enough.
  • You know enough.
  • There will always be others who know more than you.
  • You will always know more than many others.
  • You will be able to answer the questions.
  • If you aren’t sure, research the data and learn the answers.
  • You don’t have to be a best-selling author to write words that are important to others.
  • Your writing improves with practice.
  • You aren’t the one viewing you on camera. You will always be more critical of yourself than others.
  • You sound much better than you realize, especially when your words are helpful.

Bottom Line

You are more than enough. You can do this. You need to put yourself out there so others can find you.

Give them something that makes their decision easier to choose you over someone else.

Give them you.

Let’s kick imposter syndrome to the curb where it belongs.

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing ConsultantNancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and video presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Lawyers, This Is How To Find More Speaking Opportunities

Lawyers, This Is How To Find More Speaking Opportunities

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Blogging, Content Marketing, Lawyer Marketing, Legal Marketing, Marketing Strategy, Podcasting, Presentation Skills, Social Media, Video Marketing Leave a Comment

The people, companies, and institutions you want to do business with, as well as those who can play a part in helping you accomplish your goals, are your target audiences. They are an important part of the foundation of your marketing and business development plans.

Speaking and presenting to your target audiences is important. It helps you gain exposure to those people, and it helps them get to know you even better. It also helps you build credibility with those audiences because they get to see and hear you while you share your knowledge with them.

That means you need to find ways to speak in front of these people. You need to give presentations and to be invited to the table to do so. Today we’re going to discuss a very important concept that will change the number of speaking opportunities you see coming your way.

If you would like to listen to this in audio form, you can click on the green play button below or click here to listen to the podcast. If you are more of a reader, I have rewritten the podcast as a blog post below.

The following is the podcast rewritten as a blog post for you.

How Do I Find More Speaking Opportunities?

Recently, I saw a question on a legal marketing listserv from a legal marketing professional who said that one of her lawyers wants to speak more, and he wants to get in front of more audiences. She asked for recommendations for him.

Some of our colleagues offered ideas such as:

  • Call your local chamber of commerce. They are always looking for speakers.
  • Contact your bar section. Volunteer to speak in front of other lawyers because they­ could be referral sources.

Several other good suggestions were offered. I observed the conversation for a bit before I offered my advice because it is way too easy for me to offer my two cents, which soon becomes five, and then ten cents. I can’t help it because my brain is wired to serve, and teaching and brainstorming with others are ways I can do that.

It’s Time To Look At This From A Different Perspective

My suggestion was to think about this from a different perspective. First, do all of those things that everyone had already suggested. They are important.

The other thing I recommended she do was to help her lawyer understand that he is in charge of speaking opportunities and that he has control of the number of them that come his way because he can become his own media empire.

How Can You Build A Media Empire?

Media empire wasn’t the exact term I used at the time, but let’s break this down a bit. What does that mean? Well, it means that if you want to get in front of more people than you can take control by strategically using social and digital media to do that.

Don’t wait for somebody to invite you to be a guest on their podcast, or to give a presentation to a nonprofit, a business, or a trade association. If you want to get in front of those people, put yourself in front of those people.

Tell Me The Ways

How do you do that? There are a number of ways you can do that, but first, you should have an idea what you want to talk about. If you and I sat down right now, and I asked you:

  • What are the five things you would love to talk to your target audiences about?
  • What messages do you wish they knew about your practice area?
  • What topics are they concerned about?
  • What developments should they be watching carefully?
  • What challenges are looming?

I have a feeling it would be very easy for you to come up with five or ten ideas about what you would like to say that might be helpful to your audiences. In the process of publicly answering those questions, you would be demonstrating your knowledge. You don’t have to answer all of those ideas in one sitting. Spread them out.

Different Ways To Get In Front Of The Right Audiences

Once you have these five or ten topics, or more if you are on a roll, then those can become the topics to communicate on whatever social or digital media platforms make the most sense for your target audiences.

One way is via a podcast, either yours or someone else’s. You could share your ideas on LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, or Snapchat.

You can write it in a blog post. If you want to dabble in video, you can create short videos on Stories on Facebook, Instagram, and now we have Stories on LinkedIn. If you don’t have them, you’re going to. I’ve been testing them for the past few weeks or so. Stories are simply fifteen or twenty second videos that you place on those platforms. Again, this is very short form content.

Stories go away in 24 hours so you don’t have to worry about them if you’re not really excited about how they turned out. All you have to do is hold your phone or put it in a clamp. There are inexpensive desk clamps that will help provide a steady shot.

With pre-recorded videos, you can secure your phone in a clamp or you can hold it, then press record and talk for a couple minutes about one of these five or ten points that you identified as being important to your clients, your prospects, your referral sources, and any other target audiences you have chosen.

Just upload them right from your phone and add a comment. Preface what you’re uploading and say something simple like: “I want you to know about {Topic A}. There are 2 quick things you need to know about it today.”

Be Consistent If You Want To Make A Lasting Impression

If you do what I have mentioned on a consistent basis, then you are going to get more mileage than if you wait to get invited to speak in front of groups. Don’t abandon that effort because those are important, but know that there are only so many of those opportunities to speak and to give presentations.

If I waited to be accepted to speak in front of my international association at its annual conference as the primary way to help my clients understand what they need to know, I could be waiting years, which is not good for them, or for me. There is a finite number of opportunities, so I need to take control of my message and create my own opportunities.

Give Yourself Permission To Take Control

You also need to take control of this and start sending your own messages and creating your own opportunities. Write down those topics that you would like to talk to people about and then decide whether or not you would like to communicate them via the written word, the spoken word, or via video.

Again, don’t sit back and wait for other people to give you a chance to present. Become your own media producer and decide that you are going to post and control your messages and your presentations to your target audiences.

Again, continue to try to get in front of groups to present to them in more traditional ways, because that is important and is a good idea. Right now, that is a little challenging because communication has become primarily virtual. Meetings and conferences are going through a transition. Don’t give up on those but take control and send your own messages.

Create Your Own Opportunities

  • Look at this from a different perspective.
  • Don’t wait for others to invite you.
  • Become your own media empire.
  • Learn various ways you can send your own message.
  • Be consistent to make a lasting impression.
  • Take control.
  • Build your own media empire.

Okay, it doesn’t actually have to be an empire, but you know what I mean.

Please do me a favor and let me know your thoughts about this topic.

Thank you so much for being here today. I know your time is valuable, so I appreciate you spending a little bit of it right here with me.

Until next time, take care.

Do You Need Coaching In How To Do All Of This?The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP is coming soon!

If you are interested, I would love to have you sign up to be notified when I am ready to launch The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP.

I’m very excited about this as this is my new online training and coaching membership and community for lawyers to work on personal branding, social and digital media, identification of target audiences, planning content for all of those target audiences, and so much more in an effort to establish and nurture relationships and grow your practice, which has never been more important.

We will also work closely on your LinkedIn profile and presence with the goal of finding those with whom you want to do business, being found by those people, and turning your contacts into true connections.

Because I know your schedule is full, there will be bite-sized, easy-to-follow online lessons, live coaching and Q & A sessions, a safe, welcoming community, and gentle nudging and encouragement delivered by me in a non-intimidating, supportive atmosphere.

I am known for making the complex simple and understandable, so I would love to have you join me.

Please message me or visit this link to be notified when I am ready to welcome Founding Members. When I open LMAC VIP, it will only be for about a week or two as I then want to direct my attention to completely serving my Founding Members in the best way possible.

There is no obligation. I will notify you, then you can make the decision from there.

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing ConsultantNancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and video presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Lawyers, How To Write Content People Want To Consume

Lawyers, How To Write Content People Want To Consume

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Blogging, Content Marketing Leave a Comment

Lawyers, you write every day, but when it comes to writing content that people actually can and want to consume, writing for others can sometimes stop you in your tracks because you aren’t sure what to say and how to say it.

That’s what I’m going to cover in this brief video and related post.

If you would rather read, you can keep scrolling as the blog post is right there for you.

Let’s Talk About Best Practices

One of the first things you should keep in mind is the most obvious: You are writing for other people.

When it comes to creating content for others, it is important to remember that consumers of that content aren’t necessarily as knowledgeable in your practice area as you are because they didn’t spend all of the years studying and using the same language as you now use every day as a normal part of your lexicon.

They might use different words to describe what you do, what the issues are, and what they need to be concerned about.

What Language Do They Use?

Knowing that you are not writing for you, and that you aren’t even necessarily writing for other lawyers, you should back up and ask yourself:

  • What are the terms that people understand?
  • What language do the majority of the people, your clients, potential clients, and referral sources who don’t always understand what it is you’re talking about, use when they discuss their challenges?
  • What kind of terminology do media sources use? What search terms might they use when looking for an expert to contribute to content they are creating?

Create Keywords

When I conduct LinkedIn training, one of the very first things I talk about with a lawyer is the identification of keywords and key phrases that speak to all of the audiences mentioned above.

These are keywords that you are known for, or that you want to be known for, as well as terms that are important to your target audiences. What are the basic terms that they use when they talk about this matter?

Those will serve you in every way. They serve the lawyers I train on LinkedIn throughout their entire LinkedIn profile, as well on in every piece of content they create.

They will also help you so that when you’re trying to figure out what to blog about, what to write a LinkedIn article about, what updates to write, share, or react to on LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, or Facebook, what to record in your next podcast episode, and even what to use when you create video, whether that be recorded or live.

Make The Complex SimpleWhen blogging, keep it simple

Always remember that you know your practice area 50 times, even 100 times better than anybody else does so, when creating content, you have to do what I often say is one of my primary responsibilities and goals, and that is to make the complex simple.

I think that is one of your jobs, too. You need to make the complex simple for others who are consuming you, your knowledge, and your content.

Ask Your Readers

If you don’t know those keywords, then just ask or read comments that your target audiences are using when they write or when they post on social media. You can also call them and ask them. You can email them and ask them. People want to be helpful. They want to be brought into your fold.

If that is uncomfortable, we can work on those in The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP. They are not difficult to identify, but they sometimes need dedicated time and a bit of guidance. Either way, know that they are an extremely important foundational step in the creation of content that others want to consume.

Give A Spoiler AlertFirst, tell them what you're doing to tell them

Always remember that it is important to keep it simple. Tell people up front what it is you’re going to talk about.

It is almost like giving a spoiler alert. Tell them in the first paragraph what you are going to discuss, then spend the middle of your piece of content making the case and backing up that first point.

Make It Easy On The Eyes

Another best practice when you are writing is to give readers a lot of white space. As I discussed here, let your content breathe.

Our eyes are not trained to read an entire clump of copy on a page, whether that is your LinkedIn profile or whether it is a blog post, whatever that might be. If we go to a page and we see a lot of content that is just jammed together, and this can even be in a simple social media post, our eyes do not gravitate toward that content. We give up on it because it is hard to look at. So, my recommendation is to break that up into much smaller paragraphs.

Some people break up every sentence into a paragraph. Be careful about that because, in a blog post, there are some sentences that, for effect, should stand alone in a paragraph, but probably not always because it can start to look a little gimmicky if you do that on every paragraph or every sentence.

Skimmers appreciate this structure because it is much easier to skim a page and read your content when their eyes see white space in between paragraphs, so make sure you do that.

Take Time To SummarizeBest practices for lawyer blogging

I want you to end your blog post or your content by summarizing what you talked about. Again, consider using bullet points when you do that because, again, for those who skim, bullet points are very easy to view.

Let’s say somebody goes to your blog post and reads your first paragraph. Using the structure I discussed above, they will discover what you are going to talk about. Then, maybe their eyes drift down to bullet points that summarize your blog post. That’s great. Then you’ve at least given skimmers a snapshot of what you’ve talked about in the rest of your blog post or article.

Sometimes that leads people back into your blog post or your article, and they will read more. If not, you’ve lost nothing because you gave your skimmers what they came for, haven’t you?

So let’s make it very easy for them.

Give Them Your Details

At the very end, one of the last things I want you to do is to put a photo and a mini-bio about you with a link back to your bio or your website. It is important to tell people about you because people who don’t know you are going to land on your content.

If you don’t tell them who you are, some people will never know because they might have just seen this link to your blog post or article out in the wild somewhere. Help them out by letting them know who you are. It is not bragging. They have chosen to consume your content.

I always say that, if people have chosen to consume your content, let’s tell them what you do, who you are, who you help, and a little bit more about you, and then give them a link or some contact information.

To Summarize

Those are the basics about how you should consider writing content that is easy to consume.

  • Create keywords
  • Make the complex simple
  • Ask your readers
  • Give a spoiler alert
  • Make your article or blog post easy on the eyes
  • Take time to summarize (hint, hint…just like I’m doing right here)
  • Give them your details

Do me a favor and let me know when you write something. Also, let me know if this makes the writing process a little bit easier to understand.

Thank You

I know your time is valuable, so thanks for stopping by for a few minutes.

Take care.

Opening SoonThe Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP is coming soon!

If you or any lawyers you know would like to grow your practice through carefully planned, sequential coaching and training on personal branding, social media, and content creation on a monthly basis, I would love to have you as a Founding Member of The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP!

Because I know your schedule is full, there will be bite-sized online lessons, live coaching and Q & A sessions, a safe, welcoming community, and gentle nudging and encouragement delivered by me in a non-intimidating, supportive atmosphere.

I am known for making the complex simple and understandable, so I would love to have you join me.

Please message me or visit this link to be notified when I am ready to welcome Founding Members. When I open LMAC VIP, it will only be for about a week or two as I then want to direct my attention to completely serving my Founding Members in the best way possible.

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing ConsultantNancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and video presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Lawyers, Should You Automate LinkedIn?

Lawyers, Should You Automate LinkedIn Activity?

Nancy Myrland All Posts, LinkedIn, Social Media Leave a Comment

Occasionally, someone will ask me if they should use one of the automation services that help automatically find connections, send invitations, then engage in initial conversations on LinkedIn.

These are not real conversations, but machines and bots that represent you.

People are busy, so I understand why it might be tempting to automate activity on social media.

I have strong feelings about these automated services, so let’s talk about them.

Listen or Read: It’s Your Choice Below

If you would like to listen to this via audio, you can click on the green play button in the player below. If you don’t see that, just click here. If you are more of a reader, you will find the blog post directly below the podcast player.

Enjoy!

Brand Consistency

This is an important discussion for us to have because, as lawyers and professionals, this has an impact on being consistent with your brand, not to mention the way you choose to do business.

What Is Your Brand?Lawyers, what is your personal brand?

Your brand is many things, and we could go into detail in LMAC VIP about what yours is specifically, but the foundation of your brand is that you follow the law. Your brand is that you help others follow the law, that you are proactive, and that you help clients to be proactive so they and their companies stay out of trouble. You help solve problems. You help others take the right steps. You protect them.

In my business, it is my responsibility to help lawyers and legal marketers take the right steps. Bots and automation are growing. I am getting way too many automated messages in my inbox on LinkedIn that are sloppy, incorrectly targeted, way too abrupt, and “salesy.”

Actually, getting even one automated message sent by a bot is one too many for me.

Violating LinkedIn’s Terms of ServiceAutomation is against LinkedIn's Terms of Service

You should know that these bots search LinkedIn profiles to look for keywords that users identify. The bot then sends an invitation to connect, complete with a message that is often off base and insincere.

I don’t think you should ever use these services. If the empty approach of using a machine to automate networking and business development activity pretending to be you does not leave you cold, perhaps it will seal the deal if you know that using bots is against LinkedIn’s terms of service.

Here is the section of LinkedIn’s TOS for you to review, but let me save you a little time. Below you will see the screenshot of section 8.2m under LinkedIn “Dos and Don’ts,” which states:

  • Use bots or other automated methods to access the Services, add or download contacts, send or redirect messages;

LinkedIn's Terms of Service Using Bots and Automation To Engage

Using bots to send messages in the inbox is about as close to violating this term of service as I can find.

Your Account Could Be SuspendedYour LinkedIn account could be suspended

If LinkedIn discovers you are using bots, they could, I am not saying they do in every case, but they could suspend your account. It is not easy to get accounts back. In recent days, I have learned of accounts being shut down more often than in the past. I take this seriously.

Sometimes they are closed for good and you cannot get them back. Sometimes people slide by under the radar and they are never caught. I don’t think that is consistent your brand. I also doubt that is how you want to operate, hoping to slide by and not get caught.

I also know that is inconsistent with the brand of a lawyer who cares about following terms of service and who cares about following the law.

This Is Lazy Marketing, and It Shows

Another reason I don’t want you to use these automated services is that they are sloppy. I can tell almost every time these invitations are not coming from someone who genuinely looked at my profile and wants to connect.

How do I know that? Well, there are telltale signs. Because I work with lawyers, you will find the word lawyer on my profile in several places. These bots scrape profiles across LinkedIn, looking for the word lawyer because, certainly, all who have the work lawyer in their profile must be lawyers, correct?

The other day I got a message in my inbox that said something similar to this:

“I just took a look at your profile and I see that you’re a lawyer, and I’d like to connect with more lawyers here.”

This Time, I Took the Bait and Responded

Oftentimes, I don’t engage in conversation when I know this is happening. I just delete the request to connect because they’ve lost my respect right off the bat when it’s that obvious I’m not a lawyer because I never say anywhere in my profile that I am.

Well, last week I decided to reply. Some bot users choose to have the bot continue to answer, frequently incorrectly, but some choose to take over the conversation when they receive a notification of a reply.

I was pretty civil and said,

“Mmm, thanks, but I’m not a lawyer. Are you using one of the automated bot services?”

He told me he was not, and that LinkedIn Navigator allowed him to automate invitations to connect by using keywords.

Okay.

So I said,

“I have a strong concern about these services because I think they can cheapen one’s brand and they go against LinkedIn’s terms of service.”

After a little back and forth, he messaged,

“Well, it’s just that I’m trying to save time because I have a family and, you know, children at home to educate. So I’m just trying to streamline what I do here.”

My last words to him were,

“I get it. I understand. I would just be very cautious because I don’t think it’s a very good practice.”

I could have taken it further, but that’s not really my brand to be confrontational, and what would I have accomplished by pressing him on the subject?

Also, because, as I sometimes say to myself,

“You know what? It’s not always my job to save the whole world.”

Lawyers, This Will Make You Look Bad

When I hear lawyers talk about this, though, then I have to step in and strongly recommend that you do not use these services because, again, it will make you look bad because it is inevitable that something that bot is doing on your behalf is going to be inaccurate and it’s going to make you look bad.

Shortcuts to Establish RelationshipsAutomating LinkedIn connections is lazy marketing

Using bots is also taking shortcuts to establishing relationships.

Pretending we are operating in a normal (what’s that?) world where we can freely network in person, do you send somebody to a business after hours or another function for you? Do you let them log-in to a client meeting on Zoom with your name and credentials? No, you don’t, because you’re the one out there establishing relationships, and only you can engage in meaningful conversation with someone. Only you will ultimately know if that person is someone with whom you really should be connecting. Also, that kind of behavior would be unethical.

Bottom Line

Automated services are against LinkedIn’s terms of service. If you missed them, see my screenshot and link above.

The legal profession requires you, as well as those who represent you, to adhere to legal terms and terms of service, as well as established ethical requirements, so please stay away from these bots.

I know you want to do better than that. I know you can do better than that.

Opening Soon!The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP is coming soon!

If you or any lawyers you know would like to grow your practice through carefully planned, sequential coaching and training on personal branding, social media, and content creation on a monthly basis, I would love to have you as a Founding Member of The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP!

Because I know your schedule is full, there will be bite-sized online lessons, live coaching and Q & A sessions, a safe, welcoming community, and gentle nudging and encouragement delivered by me in a non-intimidating, supportive atmosphere.

I am known for making the complex simple and understandable, so I would love to have you join me.

Please message me or visit this link to be notified when I am ready to accept Founding Members. When I open LMAC VIP, it will only be for about a week or two as I then want to direct my attention to completely serving my Founding Members in the best way possible.

Thank You

I know your time is valuable, so thank you for spending time with me here today. Take care.

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing ConsultantNancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and video presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.

Lawyers, In Addition To Being Smart, You Need These 4 Characteristics To Build A Successful Practice

Lawyers, In Addition To Being Smart, You Need These 4 Characteristics

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Business Development/Sales, Lawyer Marketing, Legal Marketers, Social Media, Training in Client Service and Business Development/Sal Leave a Comment

Today, we are going to talk about 4 important characteristics lawyers need to have to be successful. If you would like to listen to this in audio form, you can click on the green play button below or click here to listen to the podcast. If you are more of a reader, I have transcribed the podcast below the player. Enjoy!

[The following is the podcast transcribed for you.]

Lawyers are very smart people. I know this because I’ve worked with lawyers since 1997, first in-house as a director of marketing and then out on my own since 2002.

I have the good fortune to work with many very smart lawyers. Many of you were recruited from law school because of your grades, because of where you ranked in your class, and because you demonstrated your knowledge, and demonstrated you were smart and would be an asset to have in a firm.

Well, sometimes being smart is just not enough. Let’s discuss.

What Do I Mean Being Smart Isn’t Enough?

Having knowledge and a wonderful, great, smart brain isn’t going to carry you through all of the practice and business development that is necessary for a profitable career.

You might get lucky and just being smart gets you through all of it. But there are other characteristics and assets that you need to demonstrate in order to continue to grow a profitable practice.

4 Characteristics You Need To Have

First: You need to be visible. It’s one thing to be smart and to sit at your desk (no matter where that desk is) and to use your brilliant brain.Lawyers, In Addition To Being Smart, You Need These 4 Characteristics

But if you aren’t visible and you’re not demonstrating that to people, and you aren’t making it obvious to people that, yes, you are smart and you have characteristics that are appealing to them, then what is going to cause someone to think about you when they have a need that is within your practice area?

So you need to be visible.

Second: You need to be creative. I know that might make some of you cringe because you’re thinking I didn’t go to law school to be creative, and I get that.

No, you absolutely did not, not in the way that you might be thinking right now. But creativity comes in many forms. Creativity means you’re going to think of doing something different, something that cuts through the clutter, something that may be a little different, or a little bit faster, or more creative than someone else.Lawyers, In Addition To Being Smart, You Need These 4 Characteristics

It might be that you decide that you are going to host a podcast. Podcasts are very much on my mind these days because I’m helping firms with them all the way from conception of idea through launch and marketing, as well as training lawyers on how to record their sessions.

So they are very much on my mind, and you will hear me mention them a lot, but you might be thinking, alright, yes, I can be creative. I will consider launching a podcast.

It doesn’t have to be long and involved. It doesn’t have to be an hour. It doesn’t even have to be 30 minutes. Mine is almost always under ten minutes. You can get in and out. You can get organized and do something creative like that.

It could be that you like video, and you pick up your phone, record a video, create a message to accompany it, something that you know is valuable because of the timing or because it’s an issue that is at hand, so you produce a really nice video, a short video, a message to people. You post that. It doesn’t have to be professionally produced, and there’s nothing wrong with being professionally produced, but you don’t need to do that today.

Think of how you can get creative.

It might only mean that graphically you produce something that is a little bit more creative than the next person so that your message comes across to those who are visual.

Third: You need to be patient. That’s not easy for a lot of us because we want our activity to produce results right now, or at the latest tomorrow, right? We Lawyers, In Addition To Being Smart, You Need These 4 Characteristicsdon’t want to have to keep working at it. We want to see website visits. We want to see listens jump up all of a sudden. We want to see content that has a lot of views on it on LinkedIn. We want to see a lot of activity on our content that we create, we want to see activity and conversation swirling around it because not only does that make us feel good, but it means we might be sharing something valuable.

It takes time, so I want you to be patient and let your tactics play out for a while before you decide whether or not they’re good or they’re bad.

Fourth: You need to be persistent. That goes along with the last point about being patient. You need to continue to do whatever it is you’re doing. If you are hosting a certain type of event and find that attendance was a little lackluster, or maybe the first on

Lawyers, In Addition To Being Smart, You Need These 4 Characteristicse was great, and the next time you do it, it’s just meh, not that many people came and you’re thinking no, I’m done because they only wanted one and nobody’s coming. Nobody’s coming to my party anymore, and they don’t want to listen to me. They don’t want to watch me. They don’t want to read my content. There’s just no activity. So that’s it. I’m going to move on to something else.

What you need to do is be persistent, and you need to continue to remind people that you are the person that is delivering these messages within your practice area.

Sometimes that means you’re also a curator of content. It doesn’t always mean that you are delivering your own content, but that you are curating the intelligence and the insight of other people within your practice area, because that, too, sends a message about you and what you know.

So these four characteristics I am giving you will help complement your intelligence when building your practice.

They are:

  • Be visible.
  • Be creative.
  • Be patient.
  • Be persistent.

I know your time is valuable, so I appreciate you spending some time right here with me.

Please do me a favor and let me know your thoughts about this topic.

Lawyers, Would More Focused, Sequential Training In A Private Monthly Online VIP Community Be Helpful To You and Your Colleagues?

The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP is coming soon!

If you would like to know when I am getting ready to launch my upcoming membership community, The Lawyers Marketing Academy VIP, where I will regularly teach and coach in a personal, private community, please let me know here. There is absolutely no obligation as it is simply an expression of interest to receive information when I am ready to launch to “Founding Members.”

In VIP, I will help lawyers who aren’t sure how to use social and digital media by teaching you how to wisely, safely, ethically, and efficiently raise your visibility, develop your brand, nurture your relationships, and grow your practice.

As always, I will make the complex simple.

 

Nancy Myrland Legal Marketing ConsultantNancy Myrland is a Marketing, Business Development, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines in order to establish relationships and grow their practices. Also known as the LinkedIn Coach For Lawyers, she is a frequent LinkedIn trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers learn and implement content, social and digital media strategies that cut through the clutter and are more relevant to their current and potential clients.

As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasting, video marketing, voice marketing, livestreaming, and Zoom and video presentation strategy and training. She also helps lead law firms through their online social media strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases.

If you would like to reserve an hour of Nancy’s time to begin talking strategy or think through an issue you are having, you can do that here.