Twitter: Nice To Meet You Egg

by Nancy Myrland on February 28, 2012

 

The Twitter Newbie EggYou signed up for this thing called Twitter a while back for one of a few reasons:

Do any of these sound familiar?

  1. You weren’t quite sure what to do with it, but you knew you needed to reserve your name so it wouldn’t be taken when you were ready.
  2. You were ready to reach out to others that you want to do business with.
  3. You were ready to develop relationships with people important to the development of your business.
  4. You were ready to learn more in your practice area.
  5. You wanted to watch how others tackled Twitter.

During the past week, I’ve been using a site, ManageFlitter, that will help me manage my Twitter followers.  I wanted to see who wasn’t following me back, who has been inactive, who has certain keywords in their profiles, and a few other selection criteria that will help me add and clean up some followers.

One of the criterion they offer, which we’ll address today, is to find those who have the Twitter egg as their avatar…the one you see above.  It’s Twitter’s default avatar that is used before you upload your photo.  It helps you get started quickly so you can begin to establish your presence and make contact with others.

Here’s my friendly advice to those of you who still have the egg:  Get rid of it!

Nothing says “I’m not committed to marketing” more on Twitter than allowing the newbie egg that hasn’t hatched to stay on your profile.

Whether you mean for it to, or not, it says:

  • You aren’t serious about presenting yourself to the public.
  • You are hiding behind the egg.
  • You aren’t serious about having people get to know you here.
  • You’re not yet ready for prime time.

As I said, this may not be your intention, but it is probably how you’re being perceived.

People like to have an idea who they’re networking with in Social Media.  They do this not only by your words, but also by being able to see your face.  Would you like your new Followers to think:

Hi…nice to meet you Egg!  You’ve never looked so…well, oval.”

You are risking a lot of “unfollows” by people you might be interested in getting to know by leaving the egg up as your avatar.  How do I know this?  Because one of the criteria on ManageFlitter is to take a look at those followers who have No Profile Image, which means the Twitter egg.

It’s one of the criteria I’m using to review those I’m following to see who’s serious about being on Twitter.  What I’m finding is that there are people who have Tweeted often, and recently, and still haven’t uploaded a photo.

There are also those who haven’t Tweeted in months or years, and those don’t surprise me, but it’s those who are conversational and still haven’t uploaded a photo that took me by surprise.

C’mon, let’s take care of this today.  Log on to your Twitter account, and get a real picture uploaded so we can see your face.  It will only take a few seconds.

After all, you don’t walk in to networking lunch or a board room with a mask on your face, do you?  You shouldn’t be doing that here either.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Print Friendly
Send to Kindle
 
5 comments
bdorman264
bdorman264

Hey, you better not be cutting me lose; I know where to find you.............:)

FollowtheLawyer
FollowtheLawyer

Nancy,

 

I would add "lazy" and "unprepared" to the list of perceptions about accounts with an egg avatar. If you can't be bothered to select and upload an image -- any image at all -- what does that say about the level of effort and attention to detail that you put into your work product?

joshhumble
joshhumble

This is SO great, Nancy. Unfortunately, a lot more emphasis needs to be placed on the riddance of the egg head, as it's too common. It's one of my biggest social media no-no's - that, and a locked "company" account. For most people and brands, photos of their animals won't work either for good business OR personal branding. Good avatars/headshots, appropriate for the medium and goals, are critical in reaching our audience and making a serious statement.

NancyMyrland
NancyMyrland moderator

 @FollowtheLawyer Good points Jay.  I've heard back from many who say they don't follow eggs, and the eggs are the first they will unfollow.  People can take the time to upload a photo on Facebook, but not on their prized business real estate.  

NancyMyrland
NancyMyrland moderator

 @joshhumble Thanks Josh!  Yes, it was eye-opening to me to find so many semi-active Twitter users that still had the egg.  You are right about locked company accounts, joined by blogs that don't allow comments, right?  Good point about avatars that  are "appropriate for the medium and goals."  Thanks for stopping by! 

Trackbacks

  1. [...] Myrland, President of Myrland Marketing, explains what the Twitter “Egg” may be saying about you. Share this:Like this:LikeBe the first to like this [...]

Previous post:

Next post: