LinkedIn and Microsoft Announce New Windows 10 App

Nancy Myrland All Posts, LinkedIn, Social Media 0 Comments

LinkedIn Microsoft Windows 10 AppLinkedIn is on a bit of a roll. Last week, LinkedIn announced the reintroduction of video to the platform. I say reintroduction because their video effort launched last year was met with less than stellar results. Today, we are seeing the first noticeable result of Microsoft’s 2016 $26.2 billion acquisition of LinkedIn.

LinkedIn Rolls Out A New Windows 10 App

This morning, LinkedIn and Microsoft announced they are rolling out an app for LinkedIn for use by Windows 10 customers. If you’ve spent any time around Microsoft the past few years, you will know everything at the start menu revolves around tiles like these:

LinkedIn Microsoft Windows 10 App Launch

Save Time By Downloading The LinkedIn App To Your Windows 10 Smart Menu

When you download this new app from the Windows Store, you will now be able to pin a Live Tile, meaning you will be able to save time by accessing your LinkedIn activity in your tile menu. As a result, when you click on that Live Tile, a LinkedIn menu will pop up, allowing you to be more connected to those people you care about connecting with on a regular basis. It will look something like this:

LinkedIn Microsoft Windows 10 Start Menu App Tile

The LinkedIn Action Center

If we zoom in on the new app, on the right you can see the LinkedIn Action Center, where you can quickly see:

  • Connection requests
  • Comments
  • Messages
  • Who has viewed your profile
  • Trending news in your industry
  • and more.

LinkedIn App for Windows 10 Start Menu

What If You Don’t Want To See All Of That Activity?

If you don’t want to see all of those activities in your LinkedIn Windows 10 app, don’t worry as LinkedIn tells us we will be able to manage which updates we would like to receive in the Action Center of the app. You should be able to choose those that are most critical to you.

You Can Also Pin The Windows 10 LinkedIn App To Your Taskbar

You also have the option of pinning the LinkedIn app to your taskbar at the bottom of the screen. As you can see, it has a counter that will serve as a reminder when you have notifications you might want to see. [I know…this is a very small screenshot.]LinkedIn App For Windows 10 Notifications Start Menu

It Will Roll Out To All By End Of July

You will know if this is available to you if you visit the Windows Store and search for “LinkedIn app.” If it’s not there, it should be by the end of July.

LinkedIn Continues To Be Important

With over 500 million users in over 200 countries, and over 100,000 articles published every week, LinkedIn continues to be an important networking and research tool for all professionals. Whether it is through this new app, your desktop, or the device in your hand, I encourage you to take a few minutes every day to network with those you care most about in your practice. As written about here, it is past time to care about LinkedIn.

Nancy Myrland, Myrland Marketing & Social Media and LinkedIn Coach For LawyersNancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Plan Consultant, and a Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines. She is a frequent LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook for Business trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers understand how to make their marketing and business development efforts more relevant to their current and potential clients, and helps lead law firms through their online digital strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases. As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasts, video marketing, and livestreaming. She can be reached via email here.

United Airlines: Principle Over People & Profits…Was It Worth It?

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Business of Law, Crisis Management, Social Media 1 Comment

United Airlines Principle Over People & Profits...Was It Worth ItYou have to think twice. No, you have to think more than twice. You have to think before, during and after a crisis to make sure your response is calm, measured, sympathetic, accurate, and correct.

Unless you’ve been stranded on a remote island for a few weeks, you are well aware of the incident on United Airlines that resulted in a passenger being forcibly removed from the plane. As ugly as that incident was, and that word doesn’t do it justice, the response from the airline matched it.

United Airlines CEO Oscar Munoz responded to the incident with what felt like a knee-jerk comment. It appeared as though he was standing on principle rather than reality. He was unprepared.

I Know What You Said. Here’s What We Heard.

I know we can find a thousand articles with the exact words Munoz used in the immediate aftermath of the removed, punched out, bleeding passenger situation when United Airlines chose the passage of its crew to another destination over the comfort and rights of its own paying customers. Yes, we’ve all read and heard his initial comments, and they weren’t good.

They weren’t good because, regardless of the words he used, here’s what we saw and heard based on how they made us think and feel:

  • Darnit, I support my employees no matter what happened!
  • Employees, I know we have a bloody, discarded, traumatized passenger, but you’ve all done your job admirably…hurray!
  • There’s fine print that allows us to do this. Every airline does it. What’s wrong with you people? Go read it!
  • We offered everyone free stuff. Nobody was interested, so we had to take matters into our own [very strong] hands.
  • We could care less that our passengers have real lives that have real reasons why they can’t leave the plane and take us up on our free stuff that wasn’t free enough.
  • We are the airlines, and we are in charge.
  • Go fly somewhere else if you don’t like our fine print.

I could go on, but those sentiments were among many messages communicated by not only the CEO of United Airlines, but by media, passengers, the flying public, citizen journalists (that’s us, friends), employees who leak memos, and more.

United Airlines Fiasco - It Is Your ResponsibilityYou see, when problems arise in our businesses, it isn’t just about our response to the problems that counts. It is about the reactions from the public that must be taken into consideration as well.

But How Could They Have Known This Would Happen?

You say you weren’t ready for such an incident to happen? You had no idea strong-armed security agents hired by the airport would come on to your plane and use tactics that were unbelievably harsh, cruel, and unreasonable?

I’ve talked about crisis communication before on this blog, but it is your responsibility….it is our responsibility as businesses, firms, partnerships, owners, CEOs, and management to anticipate the best and the worst that could happen in the normal course of business, and to discuss all of the options that could conceivably happen when the worst happens.

How Should You Do It?

Strap on your seatbelts, put your tray tables in the upright and locked position, and let’s get to work.

Are you ready?

  • You need to regularly create a war room, complete with personnel at every level United Airlines Fiasco - Create Every Possible Scenarioof the organization, with inside and outside counsel, PR professionals, experienced social and digital media experts, marketers, IT staff, client service representatives, and more.
  • With no restrictions, you need to invent every possible scenario that you can imagine happening as a part of your business.
  • Think about what you’ve heard happen in the industry.
  • Think about the absurd, and the not-so-absurd.
  • Don’t hold back and don’t hold anyone in the room back.
  • Reward participation and creativity so your list is as exhaustive as it can be.
  • List all of these scenarios on actual or virtual boards where they can be seen by all on the team.
  • Group them by type of event…clients, staff, management, buildings, equipment, social and digital assets, cities, locations, governing bodies, etc.

Next: Score and Prioritize

After you have done all of the above, I want you to prioritize them.

Score each of the scenarios by:

  • Potential damage. You might want to break this out by damage to firm, industry, profession, staff, management, partnership, clients, their businesses, etc. You will think of more categories as you go.
  • Likelihood of occurrence
  • History of this event happening in your or other firms
  • …and more based on your firm, clients, and situation

Now, based on how you scored and prioritized your scenarios, it’s time to go through the process of coming up with responses and solutions to every one of those scenarios. They need to be done individually. You will find common tactics for each, but they still need to be treated separately. We discussed this a while back when designer Kenneth Cole put his foot in his mouth during the uprising in Egypt.

The Plan

Each plan will include:

  • Who do you need to gather ASAP to discuss?
  • Who owns the communication process for each scenario?
  • The chain of communication. Who needs to hear first, then next, and so on?
  • What methods of communication do you plan to use to talk about this situation? Remember, in addition to traditional forms of communication, you also have social and digital channels of your own to tell your story.
  • How fast does all of this need to happen?
  • Who are you going to talk to on the outside first?
  • What are you going to say internally?

(Note: NUnited Airlines Fiasco - Leaked Internal Memoever assume your firm isn’t a sieve. Information will leak.)

Next: Strengthen Your Weaknesses

Once you’ve come up with a plan for each situation, then you need to determine where your weaknesses lie. Strengthen them. Make that a part of your plans above.

This includes:

  • Media training for CEOs, management, partners, and anyone else who will end up discussing this situation. If that means every employee also needs training on how to respond, then write that into your plan. Remember, a weak link at any level of the organization or firm could result in your downfall.
  • (Note: Remember that even though senior management might think it’s really good at measured, reasonable, public response, it is true that anxiety, fear, and crisis often changes that expertise. Media training is still needed. If the expert passes with flying colors, then great. You’ve lost nothing. If not, you’ve helped your cause. Never be too big for a refresher. It could mean the life of your firm and your business.)
  • After each plan is created, you need to walk through and discuss each one with the team that has been gathered. Find the weak spots. Ask to be challenged or reassured that changes need to be made, or that your plans are strong. Again, reward that kind of participation because your plans are only as good as the people putting them together.
  • Make sure these plans are spread far and wide. Don’t put them on a virtual or actual shelf to gather dust.
  • Revisit your scenarios and your plans on a regular basis. The world changes. Crises come and go. Others outside your firm will have missteps that will help you realize the formerly inconceivable event you threw out of your planning process is actually quite probable.

Principle Over People & Profits

I don’t know if United Airlines went through an exhaustive process like this. I would imaUnited Airlines Fiasco - Take The Time For Crisis Planninggine there aren’t too many companies and firms that go to this extent to guard and protect their business.

You work incredibly hard every second of every day to build an amazing business. Why wouldn’t you take the extra time to help protect it from possible controversy, tragedy, absurdity, and maybe even ruin?

  • Don’t assume you have all the answers.
  • Don’t assume your people acted appropriately. Care for them and support them, but know that everyone makes mistakes.
  • Don’t assume there aren’t at least two sides to every situation that occurs.
  • Don’t stand on principle and defiantly reply that everything was handled according to policy as it should have been. If that’s what you find out later, that’s great. If not, then you need to respond appropriately for the situation at that moment.

Is standing on principle more important than people and profits? In the case of United Airlines, and possibly with your firm, that kind of principle could actually eat your profits for lunch…and breakfast and dinner, not to mention your people.

Is it worth it to be unprepared?

Nancy Myrland, Myrland Marketing & Social Media and LinkedIn Coach For LawyersNancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Plan Consultant, and a Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines. She is a frequent LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook for Business trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers understand how to make their marketing and business development efforts more relevant to their current and potential clients, and helps lead law firms through their online digital strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases. As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasts, video marketing, and livestreaming. She can be reached via email here.

Lawyers, Is LinkedIn A Waste Of Your Time?

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Business Development/Sales, LinkedIn, Social Media 6 Comments

LinkedIn has moved beyond the “I’m just not that into you” phase of social media marketing for lawyers. It is a must and for good reason. You no longer have the luxury of deciding whether this is a tool you should spend time getting to know. For several reasons, the answer is, and always has been, yes.

Search Implications

Google loves LinkedIn, so your LinkedIn profile will come up high in search almost every time your name is searched in Google. Gone are the days when your current and potential clients call you every time to ask for your qualifications. Today, and for quite some time now, they spend time checking you out on the Internet long before they make their decision. This makes ranking high in organic search a priority.

A Basic Profile Is Not Enough

Just having a profile doesn’t do the trick. If someone clicks through to your profile, whether via Google, your bio on your website, an article you’ve written on your website, blog, or on another site, or via searching on LinkedIn, that means they are already interested in learning more about you. What a gift!

If you only have a very basic profile without much information listed in each section, you have done very little to help your cause. This is one of the easiest things you can do to garner attention from others. It is much less painful than “selling,” or having a conversation, presenting, or meeting face-to-face, hoping to say just the right thing to the right potential client at just the right time. Those things are extremely important, but a strong LinkedIn profile helps pave the way.

If a prospect conducts research on the Internet to learn more about you and your competitors, and you have a bare bones profile with no detail to it, and others have a robust, information-filled, personable, complete profile, who do you think is going to stand out more?

Your Own Personal 24-Hour Sales Force

In other words, your profile works for you even when you aren’t there. It says all of those things about you that you aren’t always comfortable saying about yourself because you are worried it might come across as too heavy-handed, self-laudatory, or salesy. Those are real concerns in the legal profession, so anything we can do to help soften that approach should be welcome.

Give Them More

The person searching has already decided they want to learn more about you, your practice area, or your firm, so you need to give them more. You need to spend time filling out each section of your profile as completely and descriptively as possible, adding interesting bits of information and media (yes, media) to the sections LinkedIn allows. You need to give them something to talk about.

You Are What You Do On LinkedIn

In case you haven’t heard this before, LinkedIn and all of the social media platforms use algorithms to decide what and who they should show to visitors at any given moment. Snapchat, Facebook Stories, and Facebook Messenger Day might be the exceptions, but only because it is early days for those new tools and we aren’t overwhelmed yet by the number of updates and stories others have posted.

Other than those few tools I just mentioned, none of us will see all content from all of our friends and followers when we log on. The sites know this would be an overwhelming firehose of updates, so they use machines to learn your behavior, and read your content to determine what you should see, and whose content they think you want to see. This goes both ways because they are also holding your content back from others who do not interact with you regularly. Yes, in a way that stinks, but it is what it is. It’s time to ethically stack the deck in your favor by being there, being involved, and sharing.

You also have to realize that LinkedIn algorithms rank profiles according to what we say, how we act on their site, what information we share in our newsfeed, on the Publisher (blogging) platform, on others’ comments, etc. If you want to give yourself a competitive advantage over others, then your behavior on LinkedIn needs to bolster that by using the right words, search behavior, media, interactions, and more.

What Should I Post On LinkedIn?

When it comes to what to post and how to behave, just as with other platforms, I always encourage lawyers to think more about how they can draw attention to others more than themselves. Making it mostly about others will be what helps you to develop and nurture relationships that help strip away the unfamiliarity that exists between you and those with whom you want to do business.

That might seem counterintuitive, but people will remember you more for how helpful and resourceful you were than they will remember your updates about your own accomplishments, so your activity in the newsfeed should reflect that behavior. This doesn’t mean you are disconnected from your subject matter and practice area on LinkedIn, but could actually help others see how closely tied you are to it.

Anyone Can Brag. You’re Not Anyone.

Anyone can brag. Not everyone can reach out and be gracious and helpful. Well, they can, but there aren’t enough lawyers that actually do that in social media.

Being viewed as helpful, as a really good resource for industry information, a connector, a person vs. a broadcaster or machine, and someone who obviously knows what s/he is talking about is going to have more of an opportunity to stand out today than someone who doesn’t do any of that.

After several years in social media, I never thought I would be saying this, but you are still within a wonderful window of opportunity to stand out and be different in social media and to be remembered because of social and digital media.

Lawyer friends, it’s time. It’s past time to care about LinkedIn.

Nancy Myrland, Myrland Marketing & Social Media and LinkedIn Coach For LawyersNancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business DevelopmenLinkedIn Coach For Lawyers - Nancy Myrlandt Plan Consultant, and a Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines. She is a frequent LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook for Business trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers understand how to make their marketing and business development efforts more relevant to their current and potential clients, and helps lead law firms through their online digital strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases. As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasts, video marketing, and livestreaming. She can be reached via email here.

#LMA17: Conference Networking Tips From Our Friends

Nancy Myrland #LMA17, All Posts, LMA, Networking 0 Comments

#LMA17 Networking Tips - What Happens In Vegas Happens Before, During & After VegasWe all have our reasons for attending Legal Marketing Association conferences. It might be to learn. It might be to meet like-minded people. It might be to network. It might be to discover new tools, services, or products we can take back to our firms. It might be to reignite the creative genius we have hiding inside that desperately needs to take a breath while we step back to see the big picture clearly again.

The Attendees of #LMA17

There will be over 1,000 legal marketers and service providers at this year’s conference, traveling from 15 countries, nearly all 50 states, and representing over 500 different firms or companies.

The common thread between all of us who will attend #LMA17, the 2017 Legal Marketing Association annual conference, March 27-29 in Las Vegas is that we want to become better at what we do so we can help our firms and clients become better at what they do. I have always believed that, and I always will. Becoming a lawyer is a very high calling, and leading and supporting lawyers so they can lead and support their clients is also a very high calling that we take seriously.

As in the past, I am writing this post to help all of us (and I do mean all of us) engage in better networking practices in order to maximize our attendance at the conference.

Surprise, I Went To Social Media To Gather Tips!

This year, I went to social media to ask my friends and colleagues to share their best networking tips with you. Hearing from such a diverse group has been refreshing. I know and admire all of the contributors, and I thank each of you for taking the time to share your advice.

Enjoy! I’ll add my networking tip and wrap-up at the end.

Your #LMA17 Networking Tips

Joshua Lenon #LMA17 Networking TipsJoshua Lenon

Tip: No app replaces the business card for quick, efficient transfer of contact details. Pair those with @evernote’s card scanner.

 

Tim Baran #LMA17 Networking TipsTim Baran      

Tip: Create a list of sessions in Evernote with speakers’ Twitter handles and send a couple of useful tweets from each presentation you attend (RT if you didn’t), making sure to @ them. Gets on their radar.

 

Adrian Lurssen #LMA17 Networking TipsAdrian Lurssen            

You are there to learn. You learn from your peers and colleagues who show, during their presentations, what they’ve been doing well – and how you can do it, too. You learn from vendors what latest offerings are available to potentially make your work easier, more productive, and more successful. And you learn from new and old friends, during casual conversations, dinners, and fun events just what type of community you belong to and how it supports you from afar for the remainder of the year once you’re back at the office, doing what you do best. So, what do you want to learn? Develop a sense of that before you go and then jump in. And don’t overthink it — surprising, fun, and interesting things can happen when you’re with 2,000 other folks. Be open to it all.

#LMA17 - Susan Kostal Networking TipsSusan Kostal

Tip Listen more. Talk less.

 

 

Heather Morse #LMA17 Networking TipsHeather Morse

Tip: Conference Agenda as a Workbook – We all flip through it, but how many of you really study it not for what you want to learn, but who you need to get to know? Who are the speakers? What companies do they represent? What types of audiences will they attract? Are these people you need to know? Do they list their social media addresses? If so, Follow, Connect and Like. If not listed in the agenda, Google will be your friend. If on Twitter, it will be easy to shoot a message over to the speaker that you look forward to meeting them at the conference. For LinkedIn, go to your desktop and click on the picture so you can send a personal message: “Ms. Smith, I’ll be attending the annual conference and look forward to your presentation on XYZ, and to finally having the chance to meet you in person.” On Twitter, you can follow, and just add a post: “.@sallysmith – look forward to your presentation on XYZ at #lma17.” Get to the session early and introduce yourself to the speaker. As you’ve already reached out to them via Twitter or LinkedIn, you have now created a warm introduction, and will stand out amongst the thousands attending the event. | Don’t wait until you get home to connect with people you meet or want to meet. Do it while the speaker is speaking, or pull out your phone and connect on LinkedIn while talking to a prospect. | Don’t hang out with your friends. Break out and meet new people, then regroup with your friends at other times during (or before/after) the conference.

Rebecca Wissler #LMA17 Networking TipsRebecca Wissler 

Tip: During: get away from your clique! Whether it’s your colleagues from work or #LMAMKT besties (sorry, yall!). Meet new people!

 

#LMA17 - Gina Rubel Networking TipsGina Rubel

Tip: Debrief immediately following the conference. Write notes on the back of business cards on who you want to reach and what you want to accomplish as a result of your post-conference follow-ups. | Send handwritten notes to select individuals who you wish to connect with personally and send personalized follow-up emails to others. Be sure to also add those individuals to your contact database or CRM tool. |  Look up everyone on LinkedIn and connect with them, and then do the same thing on Twitter. You can also connect with attendees via other social media outlets, but I usually advise waiting to connect on Facebook until you’ve established more of a relationship.

Julie Savarino #LMA17 Networking TipsJulie Savarino

Tip: Usually hundreds of people are there attending..so, on event app, review attendees to see who you know and want to see, hang out with, touch base with when there. Make time to check out and talk to exhibitors. Many have new, interesting and/or useful products-developments.

 

Eric Dewey #LMA17 Networking TipsEric Dewey

Tip: Slow down and focus on getting to know people. Networking is about finding ways to know more people. Connecting is about finding ways to know people more.

 

Eric Wood #LMA17 Networking TipsEric Wood

Tip: Pick a similar firm, ( size, practice areas, etc) from across the country and meet for coffee, gain insight. | Try to grab 5 mins with a #HOF member. They are a wealth of knowledge and great mentors!

 

Erica Galarneau - #LMA17 Networking TipsErika Galarneau

Tip: If it’s your 1st year, take advantage of the Mentor Program! Amazing way to meet senior level members!

 

Helena Lawrence #LMA17 Networking TipsHelena Lawrence

Tip: Make a list of who you want to talk to & why including a Facebook; includes in-house marketers & partners.

 

Roy Sexton #LMA17 Networking TipsRoy Sexton 

Tip: Use social media actively leading up to (and following) to get to know the attendees and any issues that are pressing/trending. Engage with them virtually – comment and reciprocate. When you arrive, make a point to connect with those whose experiences and views you have found interesting. Spend time between sessions in conversation with those folks, genuinely learning about their interests and their careers. And be sincere and humane. The worst feeling is when you’re talking to someone, and you get the vibe they are waiting for someone seemingly “more important” to enter the frame. Your best (lifelong) business contacts will start from kinship, not opportunism.

Michelle Friends 

Tip: Go to the parties. It works I swear!

 

 

Jon Holden #LMA17 Networking TipsJon Holden  

Tip: My tip would be for experienced LMA peeps to make the effort to approach those you see by themselves. We spend so much time talking to those we know, instead, challenge yourself to include anyone you see with that name badge. Network to newbies. This is how I’ve met so many of the awesome people at LMA.

Sue-Ella Prodonovich #LMA17 Networking TipsSue-Ella Prodonovich

Tip: Add your picture to the LMA app. It helps old jet-lagged people like me put a face to the name.

 

Adrian Dayton #LMA17 Networking TipsAdrian T Dayton

Tip: Work to connect with centers of influence. Centers of influence (COI) are the people who can help facilitate the most powerful introductions. An introduction from a center of influence is worth 10X meeting a random stranger because you benefit from the COI’s reputation.

 

David Ackert #LMA17 Networking TipsDavid Ackert

Tip: Stick around after the breakouts and introduce yourself to the speakers or panelists. Let them know what you enjoyed about their presentations. Invite them to join you for the next breakout or networking session. If they decline, make an effort to stay in touch offline. They are typically the taste-makers and influencers at the conference and in our industry. 

Jacqueline Madarang #LMA17 Networking TipsJacqueline Madarang 

Tip: Intro yourself to the speakers before the sessions and let them know what about the presentation you’re looking forward to hearing. Connect with them and people you meet right away on LinkedIn and follow-up. I’m a member of Marketing Technology Forum for Legal (MTFL) (in-house marketers) on LinkedIn and when I meet folks who do similar things I do, I invite them to join the group since we are about to start having roundtable calls this year. | Look at the attendee list and reach out to those you’d want to connect with. Schedule to grab a coffee or a drink. Peoples’ schedules tend to get booked up once they get there. | Make time to spend time with your service providers.

Catherine Alman MacDonagh #LMA17 Networking TipsCatherine Alman MacDonagh

Tip: Connect before you go! Reach out to attendees, speakers, and service providers who specialize in areas of interest to you. Make a specific plan to meet at a particular time and place. Pick a breakfast, networking break, lunch, or program to make sure you connect in person. | Find people you don’t know at a lunch table and sit next to them. By introducing yourself you encourage the whole table to do so! | Welcome first-time attendees and serve as mentors. This is something I do every year without fail. Meeting new people is part of the conference experience.

Nancy Myrland #LMA17 Networking TipsNancy Myrland

TipAlways remember that people are just people. Some are more visible, more outgoing, more extroverted, more introverted, more advanced in their knowledge in a specific area, more whatever…but they are people just like you. They are not more important or less important than you are. You have every right to smile and say hello to them if you’d like. If they choose not to engage, then that is probably their loss. It doesn’t mean there is something wrong with you, or that you aren’t worthy. It simply means it wasn’t right at that moment. Think of the times when someone does engage, though. Taking the chance has a much larger upside than it does a downside.

Final Thoughts

Remember:

  • Go ahead…if you want to, just say hi.
  • Don’t pressure yourself into thinking you have to say something brilliant. Friendly conversations aren’t brilliant. They are friendly.
  • Let someone know you simply wanted to say hi and wanted to shake their hand.
  • If you begin to feel awkward, that’s okay, too. You will know when it’s time to say thanks and walk away.
  • Remember, you are just as important and worthy as every other person in the room and at the conference.
  • Credentials, income, position and one’s circle of friends are wonderful and have likely been nurtured over a long period. It’s okay if that special connection doesn’t happen in an instant. With time, everything becomes more familiar.

You Have My Permission To Do This To Me

Remember, not that you want to do this, but you have my permission to walk right up to me at the #LMA17 conference to say hello. Knock into me, hug me (yep, I’m a hugger), trip me, yell “Nancy” across the room, and don’t ever feel awkward if you have to look at my name badge to remember details. It’s okay!

To all of my authors, thank you so much for contributing! I know how busy you are, so please know how much I appreciate you!

Okay, friends, are you ready? Let’s do this! I can’t wait to see all of you very soon, and often!

By the way, in case you missed it, I am curating all of the blog posts, videos, and other content that is written about the #LMA17 conference here on The Myrland Marketing Blog. Let me know if you spot any content I should add, okay? Thanks!

Nancy Myrland, Myrland Marketing & Social Media and LinkedIn Coach For LawyersNancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Plan Consultant, and a Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines. She is a frequent LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook for Business trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers understand how to make their marketing and business development efforts more relevant to their current and potential clients, and helps lead law firms through their online digital strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases. As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasts, video marketing, and livestreaming. She can be reached via email here.

#SMMW17 Networking Tips From Some Of The Best In The Business

Nancy Myrland #SMMW, All Posts, Networking 1 Comment

#SMMW17 Best Conference Networking TipsTo say I am excited about the next two weeks of my personal and professional life is an understatement. Why? Because I am preparing to attend two very important conferences.

The first, which is what I am focusing on in this post today, is Social Media Marketing World 2017, or #SMMW17. The website describes it this way:

“SMMW17 is the world’s largest social media marketing conference. By attending, you’ll make connections with 120+ of the world’s top social media pros (plus 3,000 of your peers) and you’ll discover amazing ideas that’ll transform your social media marketing. The event takes place in San Diego, California on March 22, 23 and 24.”

There is a half-day of pre-con workshops that are included in our registration fee, plus 120 more sessions from which to choose over the following 2 days…not an easy choice!

The second conference I will be attending the following week is the Legal Marketing Association annual conference, or #LMA17. I’ll be publishing a similar networking post for that conference in a day or two. The difference between the posts will be that the names and tips I have gathered will be different. You will notice overlap in concepts, though, which shouldn’t be a surprise.

This Is My 1st Social Media Marketing World

This is my first Social Media Marketing World conference. It doesn’t feel like it, though, because I’ve spent the past several years connecting with many of the people I will see next week. Many of them I already call “friends” because we have been in mastermind groups together, have brainstormed in Facebook groups, have taken online courses together, have spent time livestreaming together, have presented on webinars together…you know, connecting.

The layers of unfamiliarity have been stripped away for many of us, which is what I focus on daily in my marketing consulting business…helping lawyers connect and become more familiar with their audiences in order for relationships to accelerate so business can be done. Social media helps advance that concept exponentially. It works.

Networking Can Be A Daunting ExpeditionHow do I network with so many people at conferences?

Attending a conference with over 3,000 others can be a daunting expedition for first-timers or veterans. To help that along, I decided to gather networking tips from many who are attending the conference. I posted a request in the conference LinkedIn group, as well as 3 Facebook groups, and the #SMMW17 Event Page on Facebook. I think you’ll enjoy the wide variety of tips they have contributed.

Enjoy! I’ll add my networking tip and wrap-up at the end.

A Very Good Place To Start

I think it is appropriate that we start with Social Media Marketing World’s fearless creator and leader, Michael Stelzner. Mike is the founder and CEO of Social Media Examiner, founder of the Social Media Marketing Society, and author of the books Launch and Writing White Papers. He also hosts the weekly Social Media Marketing podcast and the Social Media Marketing Talk show.

Michael Stelzner - #SMMW17 Networking TipsMichael Stelzner

Tip: Take full advantage of the Table Talks taking place during lunch. There are dozens of tables focused on topical interests. You never know who you’ll meet that could change your business forever.

Mari Smith - #SMMW17 Networking TipMari Smith

Tip: Create a simple Google doc spreadsheet and share with your team. Get clear on the specific types of people and contacts you wish to meet in person at the live event. Research the Bizzabo app, the LinkedIn group, the Facebook Event and the hashtag #SMMW17 across all social networks. Add key contacts to your spreadsheet with columns for adding notes, key points to remember about the person, follow up notes, and more. Have your team at the ready to follow up promptly via email, social channels and a hand-written note and/or phone call from yourself. Remember time is limited and that it’s not humanly possible to meet and follow up with 3,000 people! Focus on key contacts, follow up with a warm personal touch and really think how you can make people feel special.

Sue B. Zimmerman - #SMMW17 Networking TipsSue B. Zimmerman 

Tip: Make a list of the people you want to connect with and be sure to follow them on social and start a conversation before you get there.

Tip: If you want to meet a speaker be sure to go to their session  – create a graphic beforehand that you can tweet – (make sure you grab a quote that they use ) – you can find them on social. Interact with them on twitter and Instagram.

- Networking Tips for #SMMW17Cheval John

Tip:  Do not aim to give out your business cards the first time you meet someone. It is disrespectful and you show that you are not interested in knowing the person that could be your potential client.

Amy Schmittauer - #SMM17 Networking TipAmy Schmittauer 

Tip: Help the people you meet feel like the event was totally worth it. Follow up with them and offer value in the form of an answer to a question they may have expressed to you or an introduction to someone you may have met additionally who could be a good connection for them. The more you connect people with value the more you’re remembered as someone they can trust and potentially work with. Don’t waste time with the follow up to help make this happen!

- Networking Tips for #SMMW17J.S. Gilbert

Tip: I carry a small moleskin book and tot stapler. If I’ve made a connection, I staple the card to a page and write notes. Of course, a card scanning app and decent CRM does the same thing. It’s so quick and easy for me to go analog. Of course, I go digital when I get back to the office. I actually wrote an email address on my wrist at a show that eventually turned into a nice bit of business. I guess I like pens. Be interested in others and others will be interested in you.

- Networking Tips for #SMMW17Vicki Fitch

Tip: I use Infusionsoft and we can snap the card and type notes and drop them into a contact record or funnel designed for the event.

 

Mitch Jackson - #SMMW17 Networking TipsMitch Jackson

Tip: I think the most powerful networking tip I’ve picked up over the last 30 years in business is the following: Don’t be shy, introduce yourself, and engage others. What’s the best way to do this? That’s easy. Use one or more of these ten questions http://bit.ly/start-a-conversation.

- Networking Tips for #SMMW17Christine Clifton

Tip: The biggest miss for many networkers is setting your intentions before you go to a conference. When you’re clear on who you’d like to meet and what opportunities you’d like to focus on, you’re more likely to ‘attract’ those connections. In addition, you’ll get ideas about whom to reach out to beforehand to set up 1on1s. Clarity is power.

- Networking Tips for #SMMW17Ashley Kruempel

Tip:  Wear an eye-catching name tag! As an entrepreneur launching a new business one of the creative ways I have found to help build my business and drive in clients was by wearing a name tag! I’m in social media and my Snapcodes on my name tag and made it easy for people to be curious and want to know more about what I do.

- Networking Tips for #SMMW17Debra Eckerling

Tip: Standing in line is an excellent opportunity to make a new friend. Say Hi, introduce yourself, tweet a pic. You never know where a new connection may lead.

 

- Networking Tips for #SMMW17Madalyn Sklar

Tip: Monitor the conference hashtag #SMMW17 and use it to connect with speakers and attendees. When tweeting, be sure to tag people you mention so they’ll get a notification. These two simple tips will go a long way to helping you make valuable connections before, during and after the conference.

- Networking Tips for #SMMW17David Boutin

Tip: One of my favorite tips is to make dinner reservations well in advance with extra seats so you can invite fellow attendees you meet and want to build a relationship with to a nice dinner where you already have a spot.

- Networking Tips for #SMMW17Aaron Orendorff

Tip: Create content as part of your conference experience. Not the usual “best lessons” post … but one question you ask attendees and speakers the entire time (recording everything). I did that and it was fabulous!

- Networking Tips for #SMMW17Christina MacIntyre

Tip: Look people in the eye when you meet them.

 

- Networking Tips for #SMMW17Fiona Lucas

Tip: Join the early morning walks or runs as a relaxed way to meet a few people before the day starts. This can be great if you are on your own or a little shy as it gives you familiar faces to see during the day. Everyone has a name tag so when taking photos make sure the tag is visible to help you remember names later! Don’t forget to join the conference Slack channels !!

Jennifer Cole - Networking Tips for #SMMW17Jennifer Cole

Tip: It’s always a great idea to start networking or engaging with people before the actual event, that way conversations can go even deeper when you meet in person. Use the event hashtag on Twitter!

Lindsey Miller Petersen - Networking Tips for #SMMW17Lindsey Miller Petersen

Tip: I may be biased, but this always works for me: http://bit.ly/SMMW17MeetAndEat

 

Anthony Franck - Networking Tips for #SMMW17Anthony Franck

Tip: Wear a name tag so people don’t have to ask. Wear it on the opposite shoulder from the hand you shake hands with so when you reach out to shake hands people can still easily see your name.

Megan Powers - Networking Tips for #SMMW17Megan Powers

Tip: First of all – be authentic in all communication, regardless of whether it’s before, during, or after. Show up to sessions a little bit early so you can introduce yourself to the people you’re sitting near. And if you’re on the other end of that, be open to meeting others – you never know what opportunity or new friend might come up!

Joshua White - Networking Tips for #SMMW17Joshua White

Tip: Make good use of the networking opportunities provided. Most events have topic tables, networking dinners and functions and more. Just get involved!

 

Lori Friedrich - Networking Tips for #SMMW17Lori Friedrich

Tip: I’m all about personal connections. LET SLEEPING BABIES LIE – You get an all-session recording pass included in your ticket. Live in the moment. Don’t end a great conversation to run to a session. Just like Netflix, it will be there for later viewing.

Michele Bee Bellisari - #SMMW17 Networking TipsMichele Bee Bellisari

Tip: Look up from your phone and engage with the person next to you! Topic tables!

 

Claudia Isabel - #SMMW17 Networking TipsClaudia Isabel

Tip: Make sure to dress the part, it’s hard to take someone seriously when they show up with jeans to a conference. What you wear is a reflection of your brand and your work.

 

Ai Addyson-Zhang - #SMMW17 Networking TipsAi Addyson-Zhang

Tip:  My tip is to connect with conference speakers BEFORE the conference. Share your excitement and comment on their content. Start to network way before you get to the conference!

Avery Ratz - #SMMW17 Networking TipsAvery Ratz

Tip: Don’t start the convo with a pitch.

 

Ian Gertler- #SMMW17 Networking TipsIan Gertler

Tip: These days, I feel like the social (AKA: people) part of social media is often secondary. Social is about listening, learning and then (inter)acting. Remember that you don’t always need to start the conversations … sometimes the most valuable effort can be entrenching yourself into existing ones. As for the “social” part again, I always like to make connections between people—whether both are there at the event or not. I love how Twitter with the appropriate hashtags allows you to turn virtual interactions into in-person relationships. We’re shifting beyond products and services … and that means interaction, trust, value and experiences are the new norm. Digital transformation is all about connecting the dots between people (first), processes and technology to drive experiences. Use these capabilities during events and conferences to ensure that experiences and relationships happen off screen as well. Don’t just be the person behind the phone or app.

Brian Fanzo iSocialFanz - #SMMW17 Networking TipsBrian Fanzo

Tip: Do your research prior to the event, respect people’s time and focus on having conversations not just listening for your turn to talk! Give lots of hugs and take plenty of selfies, nobody says no to a selfie after a hug! #Handshakes2Hugs

Vincent Orleck - #SMMW17 Networking TipsVincent Orleck

Tip: EVERYONE matters and everyone has something to bring to the table. Treat others that way and you’ll be golden. Don’t try to get yourself in front of people who “matter” based on what others claim…talk with everybody you can. Tbh…I don’t even bring business cards to these things anymore, for various reasons but primarily in my mind because I don’t want a convo to end with “here’s my card”…its WAY more enjoyable (especially at SMMW) to either A) use the event app to connect or B) connect with the person right there on your platform of choice.

Jeff Howell - #SMMW17 Networking TipsJeff Howell

Tip: Have something interesting to say. But my tip has always been to make the other person feel like they’re the most important person to you at that moment. Make great eye contact and reflective listen.

Lynn Abate-Johnson - #SMMW17 Networking TipsLynn Abate-Johnson

Tip: Make it easy for people to do business with you – one of my mantras…. starts with something as simple as letting people know exactly HOW and WHERE to connect with you online (and off). We take for granted that people know our handles: FB, Twitter, IG, Snapchat, LinkedIn, on and on. Take a pause in the action, pull out the phones as time allows, then and there, to follow and LIKE the person on the various social media apps. You’ll exchange each other’s follows/likes, and it’s super fun! Connecting and staying connected long after the conference is as simple as that. After the hugs and selfies, of course!!

Bryan Kramer - #SMMW17 Networking TipsBryan Kramer

Tip: I’m an ad-hoc networker. I’ve been like that my entire life, I let life lead me where I need to go and somehow I meet someone I never intended to meet. I know this is a little against the grain because then you don’t meet the 1-3 people you really should or could meet if you put time and effort into it. But the serendipity of it all makes it feel more human to me and I feel like we aren’t trying as hard, it just happened and makes sense. That said, I do think that you must follow-up with each other following the event in order to turn it into a relationship.

Peter Davison - #SMMW17 Networking TipsPeter Davison 

Tip: I think a lot of people miss out on the obvious when it comes to the larger conferences. I have to say I’m using the Bizzabo app and the Slack community to organize face to face meeting on the ground in San Diego.. You can’t just pepper it with generic messages. You need to be interested in the other person and their reasons for being at the conference. Then – you can tell your story.

Chocolate Johnny - #SMMW17 Networking TipsJohn “Chocolate Johnny” Kapos 

Tip: Use the hashtag of any conference. Make sure you engage all the time every day leading up to it. Just hammer it out and you’ll be amazed at the people who come back to you. I’m looking forward to seeing these people at the event.

- #SMMW17 Networking TipsNancy Myrland

Tip: Always remember that people are just people. Some are more visible, more outgoing, more extroverted, more introverted, more advanced in their knowledge in a specific area, more whatever…but they are people just like you. They are not more important or less important than you are. You have every right to smile and say hello to them if you’d like. If they choose not to engage, then that is probably their loss. It doesn’t mean there is something wrong with you, or that you aren’t worthy. It simply means it wasn’t right at that moment. Think of the times when someone does engage, though. Taking the chance has a much larger upside than it does a downside.

Final Thoughts

Remember:

  • Go ahead…if you want to, just say hi.
  • Don’t pressure yourself into thinking you have to say something brilliant. Friendly conversations aren’t brilliant. They are friendly.
  • Let someone know you simply wanted to say hi and wanted to shake their hand.
  • If you begin to feel awkward, that’s okay, too. You will know when it’s time to say thanks and walk away.
  • Remember, you are just as important and worthy as every other person in the room and at the conference.
  • Credentials, income, position and one’s circle of friends are wonderful and have likely been nurtured over a long period. It’s okay if that special connection doesn’t happen in an instant. With time, everything becomes more familiar.

Good Luck!

Remember, not that you want to do this, but you have my permission to walk right up to me at this or any conference to say hello. Knock into me, hug me (yep, I’m a hugger) trip me, do whatever you’d like (don’t hurt me, although I am pretty strong so I should be okay), ask me my name 10 times if you forget, and don’t ever feel awkward if you have to keep looking at my name badge to remember details. It’s okay. We’re human.

To all of my authors, thank you so much for contributing! I know how busy you are, so please know how much I appreciate you!

Okay, are you ready? Let’s do this! I can’t wait to meet all of you!

Nancy Myrland, Myrland Marketing & Social Media and LinkedIn Coach For LawyersNancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Plan Consultant, and a Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines. She is a frequent LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook for Business trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers understand how to make their marketing and business development efforts more relevant to their current and potential clients, and helps lead law firms through their online digital strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases. As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasts, video marketing, and livestreaming. She can be reached via email here.

Coverage From #LMA17, The 2017 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference

Nancy Myrland #LMA17, All Posts, Legal Marketing 0 Comments

#LMA17 LMA Annual Conference Content Collection by Nancy Myrland

I will be adding new content to this post so check back often!

It’s That Time Again! 

As I write this post, well over 1500 marketers and service providers from firms and companies all over the world have begun preparing for a conference that exists solely to help them do what they do better. That conference is the LMA Annual Conference, which is March 27-29.

I always look forward to the LMA Annual Conference because this is the time I get to see my colleagues and friends, as well as meet many new people, which I love to do. We learn. We hug. We brainstorm. We share. We work hard. We do a lot in 3 days!

We all have something in common. We want to help our firms and lawyers do what they do better, too, and that is a good feeling to share. Becoming a lawyer is a very high calling, and leading and supporting lawyers so they can lead and support their clients is also a very high calling that we take seriously.

The muscle behind the conference is the Legal Marketing Association, or LMA, which is headed by Executive Director Betsi Roach, President Jill Weber, and the International Board of Directors.

Volunteers from a dozen firms form the 2017 Annual Conference Advisory Committee, including conference co-chairs, Cynthia Voth, Director of Business Development and Administration, Miller Nash Graham & Dunn, and Paul S. Grabowski, Chief Marketing Officer, Bracewell LLP. Thanks to all of your for your selfless dedication. This is a huge endeavor and calls for a great deal of time and passion from you.

This Is A Gathering Place

As I like to do, I will collect blog posts, videos, audio and other content from this year’s conference to make it easier for anyone interested to find everything in one place.

I will add to this post as my colleagues and I publish additional content. If you see, write or produce something I haven’t found, please let me know so I can add it, okay? I will date the entries with the date I add them so you can quickly find new posts.

Tweet those links to me at @NancyMyrland, message me privately on LinkedIn here, or email me at nancy@myrlandmarketing.com using #LMA17 in the subject line.

I created an easy URL, so you can either bookmark it or just remember http://bit.ly/LMA17byNancy.

Join and Follow Each Other On My #LMA17 Twitter List

Every year, I create a list on Twitter of all of those who are attending the annual conference. I encourage you to follow that list and each other as we, obviously, have a lot in common! If you want to be added to that public list, here is where you can find the #LMA17 Attendee List. Just Tweet me to let me know you would like to be added. It’s that easy! 

Here We Go…The Collective Brilliance of #LMA17! [Just click on the titles below to go to the posts.]

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy Myrland2017 Annual Conference Video Recordings Available To Order on the LMA Website [4-18-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandRise of the Legal Marketing Technologist: Twitter Recap for #LMA17 by Nicole Cudiamat Minnis on The National Law Review [4-18-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandInfographic: Top Takeaways From The 2017 LMA Annual Conference by Introhive [4-18-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandPodcast from #LMA17 About The Latest Marketing Tech Seen At The Conference with Ian Turvill, Rachel Shields Williams, Adrian Dayton, Adrian Lurssen, and Guy Alvarez [4-18-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandIn-House Counsel Panel: The Rapidly Changing Legal Buying Cycle by Lindsay Griffiths on Zen And The Art Of Legal Networking [4-18-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandWooing the Gator: Aligning Behavioral Economics With Legal Marketing by Mike Carrozzo on LMA’s Strategies + Blog [4-18-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy Myrland

Artificial Intelligence: Changing the Practice and Marketing of Legal Services by Lindsay Griffiths on Zen And The Art Of Legal Networking [4-18-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy Myrland2017 LMA Annual Conference Session Recaps – Pre-Conference Programs by Mike Carrozzo on LMA’s Strategies + Blog [4-18-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandWooing the Gator Brain: A Lesson in Behavioral Economics by Lindsay Griffiths on Zen And The Art Of Legal Networking [4-10-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandFive Hot Content Marketing Tips for Lawyers from LMA 2017 by Susan Kostal on Attorney At Work [4-10-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandLMA ’17 – A 1st Timer’s Perspective by Rich Bracken on LinkedIn Publisher [4-8-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandRemoving the Silos between PR and Content Marketing by Vivian Hood of Jaffe [4-7-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandPromoting Diversity among Law Firm Marketing Departments by Paul D. Webb of Jaffe [4-7-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandUsing Predictive Analytics to Inform Law Firm Marketing Programs by Melanie Trudeau of Jaffe [4-7-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandJuggling Generations: How Law Firms Can Mind the Gap by Sue Remley of Jaffe [4-7-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandDay One At The Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Jennifer Waggoner of Xceede Solutions [4-3-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandThoughts From A First-Time LMA Attendee | Guest Post by Brenda Christmas Marlowe on The Legal Watercooler blog [4-3-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy Myrland(Artificial) Intelligence From The Legal Marketing Association Conference by Rob Saccone, Partner @Nexlaw [4-3-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandLegal Marketing Trends from LMA by Mike Mellor on LinkedIn Publisher [4-1-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandFinal LMA Thoughts: Strive To Attain The Best by Heather Morse on The Legal Watercooler Blog [3-31-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandThe GC Panel: Bringing The Voice Of The Client to LMA by Heather Morse on The Legal Watercooler Blog [3-31-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandCould Your Client Have Written This Letter? by Heather Morse on The Legal Watercooler Blog [3-31-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandFirst Thoughts From #LMA17 | Ask When? Where? If … Then … by Heather Morse on The Legal Watercooler Blog [3-31-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandLegal Marketers Who Care Too Much by Heather Morse on The Legal Watercooler Blog [3-26-17] 

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandFor Innovation and Expertise at Your Next Conference, Invest Time in the Exhibit Hall by 2017 Conference Co-Chair Cynthia Voth [3-25-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy Myrland#LMA17: Conference Networking Tips From Our Friends by Nancy Myrland on The Myrland Marketing Minute Blog [3-20-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy Myrland

Don’t Be A Lurker. 6 Things To Do BEFORE Attending a Conference  by Heather Morse on The Legal Watercooler Blog [3-17-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandThe Inside Story: In Networking 2.0, Know Your End Game by Laura Toledo in JD Supra Perspectives [3-14-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy MyrlandTackling The Challenge Of PR Measurement by the PR SIG of the Legal Marketing Association. [3-6-17]

 

#LMA17 Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Nancy Myrland3 Career-Building Reasons To Attend The Legal Marketing Association Annual Conference by Jody Glidden of Introhive [3-6-17]

 

Nancy Myrland, Myrland Marketing & Social Media and LinkedIn Coach For LawyersNancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Plan Consultant, and a Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines. She is a frequent LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook for Business trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers understand how to make their marketing and business development efforts more relevant to their current and potential clients, and helps lead law firms through their online digital strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases. As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasts, video marketing, and livestreaming. She can be reached via email here.

Lawyers, To Build Your Practice, You Won’t Know Unless You Listen

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Business Development/Sales 0 Comments

Lawyers, To Build Your Practice, You Won't Know Unless You ListenYou’re excited, maybe even a little nervous. You finally have the opportunity to sit down and talk to that one person you want to get close to because you’d love to have him as a client. You know this person could be instrumental in helping you build your practice. You’ve waited for this opportunity for a long time…or maybe you’ve only waited a short time. 

A Golden Opportunity

Whichever it is, consider it a golden opportunity. It might not come along again for a very long time, so let’s make the best use of it, okay? When you have this opportunity to go in and meet with a potential client, don’t go in with your guns blazing.

The Art of The Slow Dance

Building your practice with the right timing is an art, kind of like a slow dance. You don’t go in to meet someone showing them every move you know how to make, or telling them about everything you have done, and giving them every piece of material that has been perfectly prepared for a meeting like this. If you bust a move now, you might scare the bejeebers out of him. You have to earn the right to do that, and that first meeting isn’t typically that time.

When I was just out of college, my first few jobs before getting into marketing management were in sales. With one of these jobs, I had an outstanding experience because it came with professional sales training. To this day, I am thankful for the skills I was taught and learned.

We weren’t allowed to take anything to the first meeting with a potential client except a pad of paper, a pen, and a calendar. I’ll explain why in the steps below.

Here are my recommendations for you as you approach this opportunity you have been given.

First, Bridge The Silence.

If there is an uncomfortable or awkward moment when you first meet this person, and there might not be, help that person feel comfortable. Even if they are in their own office, that doesn’t mean they are always comfortable with these meetings, or that they know what the purpose of this meeting is supposed to be. Be friendly and be welcoming. Help put them at ease so that the conversation flows more freely.

Second, Be There To Learn.

I want you to think of this meeting, this opportunity, as a time that is strictly about them and not about fulfilling your goal of securing their business. Yes, I know that is in the back of your mind, but try to put that away for a while. That comes down the road. Make it all about them.

Ask questions about:

  • them
  • their business
  • their industry
  • challenges they are seeing at this time
  • challenges they see coming on the horizon
  • if they think that critical bill before the legislature or Congress will pass this session

Third, I Want You To Listen

Ask the questions above, or ones like them, then listen. Don’t interrupt when you have a story that you can relate to what they are saying. This is their time to talk about their circumstance. Don’t talk about other cases you have been involved in that coincide with what they are saying. There will be time for that.

Put them at ease and help them feel comfortable sharing information with you by being the best listener you can be. When they make a comment, go ahead and ask a natural follow-up question that might help to clarify the comment just made. Again, don’t think of this as a question that sets you up to talk about what you do, but rather a follow-up question that shows them you are listening and that you sincerely want to learn about their situation.

What Next?

Only after you have this discussion and you have listened to them do you even come close to earning the right to talk about what you do. At the right time, it is a privilege to talk about what you do. You have to gauge the temperature of the discussion. If that person has indicated there is a true need to talk about a specific challenge and has asked you a question about what you would do in that situation, then, if it is appropriate, it is okay to follow up with your knowledge and wisdom, and what you think next steps might be.

Your Options At This Point

If you don’t get that feeling that they want or need to talk business at that moment, you need to get a feel for the next best step. If you were actively listening, your gut usually tells you what to do based on the conversation you just had, and the body and actual language this potential client is sharing with you. Based on those factors, I would then choose one of the following.

[Before you choose, remember, this is a slow dance. Relationships are built on trust, and you need to be okay knowing this might just be the first of many steps in building their trust in you. Rushing this situation might turn the other person off and put an end to the relationship as soon as it started, but allowing it to grow at a rate that is comfortable to your potential client can result in a much stronger, longer relationship.]

Choose the one(s) that make sense:

  1. Graciously thank that person for the conversation, and for the opportunity to get to know them better.
  2. Ask them if there is anything you can do to help them.
  3. If they express a need for help, then ask them if they would like to discuss that now, or if you can follow up with them again.
  4. If they would rather talk another time, ask if it is okay to schedule something now because you know how crazy both of your calendars are these days.

Note: Along with number 3, it’s okay to tell them you have some thoughts about what they just shared with you during your discussion and ask if it is okay if you schedule a time to share those thoughts with them, or do they have a need to discuss them now? If they’re ready for them now, go ahead. If not, then move on to number 4. Of course, don’t do this in a pushy way as that will kill your opportunities quicker than anything else. Remember, slow dance.

The Bottom Line

The bottom line is that, when building your practice, if you don’t listen, you won’t know. It is important to remember:

  • You have to listen to them or you will have no idea how to propose ideas, solutions, and next steps for them.
  • Practice listening actively to your clients, potential clients, and all others.
  • Don’t always think about your next statement while they are talking because they will probably be able to detect your thoughts are elsewhere by watching you, your face, and your body language. That can be quite insulting.
  • What they have to say at this stage is infinitely more important than what you would like to sell them.

Nancy Myrland, Myrland Marketing & Social Media and LinkedIn Coach For LawyersNancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Plan Consultant, and a Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines. She is a frequent LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook for Business trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms, and legal marketers understand how to make their marketing and business development efforts more relevant to their current and potential clients, and helps lead law firms through their online digital strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases. As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasts, video marketing, and livestreaming. She can be reached via email here.

Breaking: Social Media Comes of SCOTUS Age

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Social Media 0 Comments

SCOTUS Packingham v. North CarolinaOn Monday, February 27, 2017, during oral arguments in Packingham v. North Carolina, a case involving First Amendment rights of free speech pertaining to the use of social media by former sex offenders in North Carolina, United States Supreme Court justices expressed opinions of social media that show it has come a long way toward being considered mainstream communication. There appears to be acknowledgment By SCOTUS that social media are important and instrumental in the way human beings communicate.

The National Law Journal summarized the argument this way:

“On Monday, the court dealt with the subject head-on, using First Amendment metrics like ‘overbreadth’ and ‘strict scrutiny.’ And the justices showed a level of familiarity with social media that was surprising, given that most justices, when asked, say they don’t use Twitter or Facebook.”

First, The Case of Packingham v. North Carolina *

As summarized on SCOTUSblog, the issue is whether, under the court’s First Amendment precedents, a law that makes it a felony for any person on the state’s registry of former sex offenders to “access” a wide array of websites – including Facebook, YouTube, and nytimes.com – that enable communication, expression, and the exchange of information among their users, if the site is “know[n]” to allow minors to have accounts, is permissible, both on its face and as applied to petitioner, who was convicted based on a Facebook post in which he celebrated dismissal of a traffic ticket, declaring “God is Good!”

Robert C. Montgomery, Senior Deputy Attorney General for The State of North Carolina, shared with the Justices:

“For many years, North Carolina, like other States, had laws prohibiting sex offenders from being at physical places where children congregate; schools, playgrounds, day cares, and parks. In 2008, North Carolina decided to prohibit sex offenders from being at virtual places where children congregate online; specifically, commercial social networking websites.”

The Justices Discuss Social Media

While reading through the argument, I found more than a few comments interesting.

Justice Kagan stated:

“So a person in this situation, for example, cannot go onto the President’s Twitter account to find out what the President is saying today? Not only the President. I mean, we’re sort of aware of it because the President now uses Twitter. But in fact, everybody uses Twitter. All 50 governors, all 100 senators, every member of the House has a Twitter account. So this has become a crucial — crucially important channel of political communication. And a person couldn’t go onto those sites and find out what these members of our government are thinking or saying or doing; is that right?”

Justice Kennedy drew an analogy between social media and the public square, where free speech rights are well-recognized. He  said:

“Well, it seems to me, I don’t know if — that we ever did have a public square, but assuming we had a public square a hundred years ago, could you say that this person couldn’t go into the public square? The — the sites that Justice Kagan has described and their utility and their — and their — extent of their coverage are — are greater than the communication you could ever had, even in the paradigm of public square.”

Justice Sotomayor brought up LinkedIn while trying to focus the discussion and get to the heart of the matter about what is considered traditional social media:

“Take something like LinkedIn, which many, many people in our society today are looking for jobs there, but high school students are permitted to look for jobs and to post their data, personal data on that site. So, is that traditional social media or not?”

Justice Breyer, in an effort to understand where the line between physical and virtual appears, asked: 

“What about all the orders — about all the ways you just listed that they have all the statutes would say you can’t approach children and say certain things….What’s the difference?”

While discussing the North Carolina statute that states the crucial factor in limiting the use of digital sites that link to other users’ profiles, Justice Kagan offered:

“But — but — I mean, yes, that narrows it. It — it takes the nytimes.com out of the statute, but it doesn’t take the sites that people use today, as I suggested — whether it’s Twitter or whether it’s Facebook — which have become incredibly important parts of our political culture, of our religious culture. If you ask, there are surveys that say how many Americans have communicated their faith on social networking sites in the — in the past week, and it turns out that one in five. That’s about 50 million Americans use this for religious community purposes. So whether it’s political community, whether it’s religious community, I mean, these sites have become embedded in our culture as ways to communicate and ways to exercise our constitutional rights, haven’t they?”

A Growing Need To Understand Social Networking Sites

In what is, obviously, a growing need at every level to understand what each social networking and virtual site offers its users, Justice Kagan attempted to clarify the narrow tailoring North Carolina included in this statute:

“It seems that some — some of what’s exempted by the law seems, I have to say, some of the most dangerous stuff. So you exempt any website that provides only a chat room or only photo sharing. So why is that? Because if I would have said, like, where the most dangerous activity takes place, it’s in chat rooms and via photo sharing.”

“It just seems to exempt the stuff that’s most easily used to — to do exactly the things that this statute is meant to prevent.”

“When you just said to Justice Ginsburg, well, maybe that would be unconstitutional if they included these things that are instead exempted, so you mean that there’s a constitutional right to use Snapchat, but not to use Twitter?”

“Well, I would have — I would have thought that Snapchat is — is — maybe I have it wrong. I’m not any expert on this. But isn’t Snapchat photo sharing?”

Perhaps not fully understanding the immense amount of behind-the-scenes sharing that takes place on SnapChat, Senior Deputy Attorney General Montgomery attempted to share his knowledge of social networking sites such as SnapChat and Twitter:

“Well, Snapchat, as I understand it, you don’t get the level of information that you get from something else. Because Twitter is — you can find out much more information than you could from however many seconds of video or pictures or whatever you get with Snapchat.”

Justice Breyer, while discussing the merits of limiting access to information to those who have already been punished for their crime:

“Here, you take a group of people who’ve done something wrong, been fully punished, and you’re saying that they might say something to somebody which would be dangerous. And you’re right; it might be. On the other hand, your remedy from that is to cut off their speech.”

The argument continued while the Justices attempted to understand why it should be possible to limit access to social media that have now become sites enabling the free flow of information.

Justice Kagan:

“How many people under 30 do you think don’t use these sites to get all their information? Under 35? I mean, they’re — increasingly, this is the way people get everything that — all information.”

“This is the way people structure their civic community life.”

Justice Ginsberg discussed First Amendment rights connected to cutting people off from information:

“The point is that these people are being cut off from a very large part of the marketplace of ideas. And the First Amendment includes not only the right to speak, but the right to receive information.”

In his rebuttal, attorney Goldberg spoke to the proliferation of social media and “core-protected” speech.

“The President is speaking to the people through this medium. So it is an extraordinary argument to say not everybody does it. I don’t think that’s the test. The test is how much of your core First Amendment activity is foreclosed. And the ability to speak with this networked group of people all over the world is as strong — this is, as Justice Kennedy said, well beyond the traditional town square. And I’m sure there were people who didn’t go to the town square, but that wouldn’t be a basis for — for upholding a restriction there.”

Bottom Line

I would imagine we will continue to see and hear arguments and cases directed toward the understanding, misunderstanding, use, and misuse of social and digital media. If The Supreme Court of The United States has begun to acknowledge the importance of these sites, and of the rights of US citizens to communicate and learn on and from them, we certainly have reached a tipping point. Stay tuned for what will be an interesting, and sometimes challenging, dissection of tools that have become an obvious part of our rights and our culture.

I encourage you to add any comments or clarification, or other perspectives in the comments section below. If you think others might be interested in this post, I’d be grateful if you would share it with them. Thank you.

*Please know I am not an attorney, nor am I attempting to provide legal counsel. Being an advisor to lawyers, law firms and legal marketers, I am covering this story because of the fascinating and historic shift and formation of opinion having to do with social and digital media. I have included highlights and comments important to my clients in these areas. There is much more to the story. If you, too, would like to read the entire Packingham v. North Carolina argument before The Supreme Court of The United States, you can find that here.

Nancy Myrland, Myrland Marketing & Social Media and LinkedIn Coach For LawyersNancy Myrland is a Marketing and Business Development Planning, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines. She is a frequent LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook for Business trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers, law firms and legal marketers understand how to make their marketing and business development efforts more relevant to their current and potential clients, and helps lead firms through their online digital strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases. As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasts, video marketing, and livestreaming. She can be reached via email here.

Lawyers: No Time To Create A Marketing Plan?

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Lawyer Marketing, Marketing Plans & Planning, Marketing Strategy 1 Comment

Lawyers, Are You Sure You Don't Have Time To Create A Marketing Plan?It’s the end of November. For some of us, this means a change in seasons when the leaves turn color and fall off, and the air turns brisk. Things begin to change. We wear additional layers of clothing to accommodate the ever-changing temps, and we hope that the cold and ice stay away for as long as possible…all Winter if you ask me.

Professionally, November and December also bring about that pressure we feel to carve out some time to think about what we can do next year to grow our business.

A Simple Process

If we make time, the process might resemble this:

  • A review of 2016.
  • A frank discussion with ourselves about what went right and what went wrong.
  • Taking a look at our goals for 2016 to see what we accomplished.
  • Creating a few simple goals for 2017.
  • Digging into each of those goals to decide how we are going to achieve them.
  • Setting a timeline and budget for those activities.I Don' t Have Time To Write A Marketing Plan!
  • …and so on.

I Don’t Have Time

I know that sounds like a pretty simple explanation of what needs to be done. The reason it looks simple is because we all tend to make the process much more difficult and time-consuming than it has to be. Similar to that paper cut we had two years ago that our memory has now stretched into a gaping wound, we all tend to stretch the task of creating an annual marketing and business development plan into a Herculean task that we just don’t have the time or fortitude to tackle. We continue to claim “I don’t have time.”

If that resembles your line of thinking in any way, I must ask you…

“How’s that working for you?”

You Wait. Others Move.

While you are putting off creating what could arguably be the most important component of your business because you don’t have time, here is what might be happening:

  • Others (a.k.a. competitors) in your practice area are creating their plans.
  • Opportunities to connect with potential clients are slipping through your fingers.
  • Current clients are becoming disenchanted because they aren’t being contacted frequently enough.
  • Someone else is establishing a referral relationship with someone you thought was loyal to you.
  • You aren’t making the income you should be.
  • You aren’t doing anything to secure the future of your practice.
  • You aren’t defining those skills you need to work on to advance yourself.
  • You aren’t growing.

Yes, those are all results we can focus on when we write marketing and business development plans. You and I can “I don’t have time” ourselves until we believe it, but deep down we know that we can find time for that which we enjoy, or which we find critical to our success.

Facing The Reality

If this has been a struggle for you, or at the very least, a weak link in your practice, let this be the year:

  • You win that struggle
  • You strengthen that weakness
  • You focus your marketing and business development efforts

…and, last but not least,

Hope Is Not A Strategy

You and I can’t sit around hoping that business just walks in our doors. As you’ve heard a thousand times, hope is not a strategy…at least not a sensible one.

Competition is not going away. Our clients have many choices, including insourcing their legal work, or giving more of their work (your work) to other lawyers or advisors. Take control of your year. Make it your year.

As always, let me know if I can be of service to you as you create your marketing and business development plans.

Nancy Myrland, Myrland Marketing & Social Media and LinkedIn Coach For LawyersNancy Myrland is a Marketing Planning, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing disciplines. She is a frequent LinkedIn and Twitter trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers and legal marketers understand how to make their marketing and business development efforts more relevant to their current and potential clients, and helps lead firms through their online digital strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases. As an early and constant adopter of social and digital technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasts, video marketing and livestreaming. She can be reached via email here.

Lawyers, Here’s One Skill You Need To Have

Nancy Myrland All Posts, Client Service and Retention, Lawyer Marketing 0 Comments

Lawyers, One Skill You Need To HaveImagine if all of your clients said: “Thank heavens that problem has been taken care of. I feel like the weight of the world has been lifted off my shoulders.”

Even better, imagine they also said this: “I had an amazing experience working with him. He understood exactly what I was feeling, what was tearing me up inside, and what the ramifications would be to me, to my job, and to my company if this didn’t get solved. He really gets it.”

Spring Into Action

When your client has an issue that needs to be resolved, it’s easy to spring into action and become programmed and process-oriented about what you need to do in response to his or her issues and challenges. You want to make sure you solve your client’s problems, so you seriously and diligently take in all the facts of the matter so you can decide the best way to proceed.

The Best Of Both Worlds

You want to make sure you solve your clients’ problems to the best of your ability, using the best your mind, precedent, and research have to offer, but you also need to do it with another critical skill, and that is empathy. Using empathy when dealing with clients and potential clients helps you get on the same playing field with them, which helps you understand at a deeper level what they are going through.

Merriam-Webster tells us that empathy is:

The feeling that you understand and share another person’s experiences and emotions : the ability to share someone else’s feelings

Put Yourself In Their Shoes

I understand you can’t let emotions cloud your judgment, but this is something different. It might help to put it in another context. Imagine if, upon finding out your mother has a serious illness, your doctor or nurse takes the time to sit down with you, to look at you as a real person and not just another family member of some patient with a serious medical condition. She looks directly into your eyes and tells you she understands how you are feeling because this is a very scary time and she understands how much you love your mother.Lawyers, Have Empathy For Your Clients

In lay terms, she tells you what needs to be done, and that she will be with you and your mom every step of the way.

She then goes on to tell you that she has a mom, too, and if this was her mom, she would be tied up in knots inside because she would just want her to be well, and happy, to not suffer, and to be able to get back to what she was doing before.

She goes on to tell you that because of that, she is going to take very good care of her, and will do everything she possibly can.

I could go on, but I think you are getting the picture. She is taking your feelings into consideration. She has entered your world and is not only discussing a medical condition that your mom has, but is also empathizing with what you are going through. She has shown that she is committed to doing everything medically possible to help her, but also that she feels your pain, and cares about your mom, too. She’s not guaranteeing an outcome, but she is relating to what you are going through and wants you to know she cares.

I don’t know about you, but I wish those were the kinds of doctors and nurses I had to deal with every time I went through this with my mom and dad.

The Statistics Reinforce The Practice

In Rebekah Radice’s post discussing 7 Social Media Trends That Will Change Your Marketing Strategy, she discusses the importance of empathy in marketing and client service.

Rebekah tells us:

“While there might be a lot of talk around empathy these days, I believe we’ll see it reach new heights in 2017. Companies that take empathy from an idea to an art form will not only survive, but thrive. And the statistics prove it.”

She goes on:

“The top 10 companies in the Global Empathy Index 2015 increased in value more than twice as much as the bottom 10 and generated 50% more earnings. Average earnings among the top 10 were up 6% in 2016, while the average earnings of the bottom 10 dropped 9%.”

I’m not suggesting you practice empathy just for marketing and revenue purposes, but because it is the right thing to do. It is the human thing to do. Business and profits will follow, and those are the icing on the cake, but they aren’t the primary motivation. Your clients are.

More Fulfilling For Both Of You

This is the kind of situation I want for you and your clients. This makes for a more fulfilling relationship on both sides of the equation. Of course you are helping your clients solve problems, but you are also helping them feel better, safer, and relieved because you are also validating what might be tying them up in knots inside.

What do your clients want?

They want their problems solved, and:

  • They want to be heard
  • They want to be understood
  • They want to be taken care of
  • They want to worry less
  • They want to feel secure knowing you are doing everything you can to take care of their issue

They want results backed up by empathy.

Bottom Line

Your clients want to know you are not only a brilliant professional, but that you are also a human being on the other end of the transaction that understands what they are going through.

  • Be great.
  • Be smart.
  • Be efficient.
  • Be a problem-solver.
  • Get things done.
  • Do it right.

But always remember to show empathy. It can be pretty powerful, don’t you think?

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NNancy Myrland, Myrland Marketing & Social Media and LinkedIn Coach For Lawyersancy Myrland is a Marketing, Content, Social & Digital Media Speaker, Trainer & Advisor, helping lawyers and legal marketers grow by integrating all marketing practices. She is a LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook trainer, as well as a content marketing specialist. She helps lawyers and legal marketers understand how to make their marketing and business development efforts more relevant to their current and potential clients, and helps lead firms through their online digital strategy when dealing with high-stakes, visible cases. As an early and constant adopter of social and digital media and technology, she also helps firms with blogging, podcasts, video marketing, and livestreaming. She can be reached via email here.